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That's kind of fun, did slip with spelling.
To answer your question, though:

What's magis? It's a Jesuit principle that underlies everything we do at Saint Joseph's. Magis inspires us to think more broadly, work a little harder and make the most of our God-given talents. More simply stated, magis means making each choice - and therefore each day - better than the last.
I know someone in marketing came up with that garbage. Anyone with an English degree would shudder.
 

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Have no issues with the slogan, not to bad as they go. Just curious on advertising up here when there are so many local quality universities and St Johns in Queens and Providence.
I assume they're just trying to broaden/strengthen the geographic footprint. How effective it is I can't say, but I know that's the intent. In my experience, SJU's never really drawn too well from that far north.
 

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CBS Under the Radar Players

http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/eye-on-college-basketball/24785097/twenty-under-the-radar-breakout-players-for-the-2014-15-season

Trey Davis, UMass: Derek Kellogg is going to need everyone on his perimeter to do more this season following the departure of Chaz Williams. Now a junior, the 6-foot Davis showed moments of promise last season as a sophomore and scored in double figures in four consecutive games from Feb. 21-March 5. If UMass is to have a chance to return to the NCAA Tournament for the second consecutive season, it needs 12-14 points a night from Davis.

Mo Alie-Cox, VCU: A mountain masquerading as a man, the 6-6, 250 pound Alie-Cox looks more like a defensive end than a basketball player. With Juvonte Reddic no longer on the Rams' roster, look for Alie-Cox to be VCU's primary post threat. Pencil him in for eight and eight.

Scoochie Smith, Dayton: Armed with 20 pounds of extra muscle along with the experience of playing major minutes on a team that advanced to the Elite Eight, Smith will be in the conversation about the best point guards in the Atlantic 10. With Khari Price --- last year's starting floor general --- no longer in the Flyers' program, Dayton is now truly "Scoochie's" team.

Shawn'Dre Jones, Richmond: Several Atlantic 10 coaches believe the Spiders are one of the league's sleeper teams and Jones is a major reason why. The 5-10 guard averaged 10.7 points last season after Richmond lost its top scorer Cedrick Lindsey to injury and now he'll join Kendall Anthony in the Spiders' back court to form an electric tandem on the perimeter.

Hassan Martin, URI: In all of college basketball last season, Martin was one of two freshmen to average nine points, eight rebounds and three blocked shots in conference play. Joel Embiid was the other. The Staten Island native should be one of the better players in the Atlantic 10 for years to come.
 

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From what I've read, Yacoubou was very good last night, albeit against Harriet Beecher Stowe.
Indeed.

Ash Yacoubou looks like a member of the Jett-Mitchell-Evans-McCall tribe (as does freshman guard Davell Roby).

Plenty of questions for SLU this year, but if they can surround Yacoubou with a supporting cast that can play D and hit open 3s, they will be competitive in the A10.
 

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The A10 will institute a 30 second shot clock for exhibition games.
This will do wonders for our defense, though it may hurt our offense. VCU was borderline terrible in half court offensive sets last season with 35 seconds to create something. Take away that extra time and it may get worse if we aren't any better in our half court sets.
 

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Discussion Starter #350
This will do wonders for our defense, though it may hurt our offense. VCU was borderline terrible in half court offensive sets last season with 35 seconds to create something. Take away that extra time and it may get worse if we aren't any better in our half court sets.
Or it might get better. It does not matter because the 30 second clock is only being used in the exhibition.
 

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can we call them Electric Boogaloo?
Actually, I started calling our backcourt the countertop. We have always had comparisons of Anthony to "the microwave". So now teams can get burnt by "the toaster". If we can find "the hot plate" we will be all set.
 

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They used the 30 sec clock in the UMass exhibition against AIC. I really didn't notice any difference in how the game looked and felt.
But did the 30-second clock force the defense to rush the floor slapping?
I'm really hoping that this year UMass can move forward from the more pedestrian type of floor slapping and graduate to more intricate floor slapping with a catchy beat to it.
 

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But did the 30-second clock force the defense to rush the floor slapping?
Ha ha.... and what place did you come in last year?
 

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http://www.foxsports.com/college-basketball/story/there-s-way-more-to-dayton-basketball-than-you-think-110614

Good article on the history and what basketball means to Dayton.

There's way more to Dayton basketball than you think

The lineage of Dayton basketball officially began more than a century ago and has encompassed more than 1,500 wins, but it really began when a World War II naval officer named Tom Blackburn was hired as the school’s first full-time basketball coach and started to put Dayton on the map. And it really emerged nationally when one of Blackburn’s former players, Don Donoher – whose names graces the school’s current practice facility – took over the program and, in 1967, led the Flyers to the national title game, where they lost to Lew Alcindor and UCLA.

This is not to say John Miller was a tyrant. He was no Bobby Knight. But you definitely knew who was boss. Nor is it to say that his sons, both of whom led their teams to within a bounce or two of the Final Four last season, run their programs exactly the same way their father ran his teams. But the father’s attention to every single detail, that year-round obsession with working harder and getting better? You see that at Dayton, and at Arizona too. You see it in Archie Miller’s practices, where everything seems chaotic and competitive yet everything is organized to the minute. You see it in his results, where players like Devin Oliver, last season’s senior leader, transformed his game in four years. Just look at his three-point shooting accuracy: 16 percent his freshman year, 21 percent as a sophomore, 28 percent as a junior, 40 percent last year.

But what do you know about the University of Dayton?

Did you know that when Dayton went to its NIT title game back in 1951 the train station in town was jam-packed with fans, a mass exodus from Dayton to Madison Square Garden to watch their boys play?

Did you know that when the university’s old field house opened back in the 1950s, the school had to bring in extra bleachers from the football stadium to accommodate overflow crowds, and then the place sold out for the next two decades?

Did you know that Dayton is a city of inventors – the Wright Brothers, of course, but also the man who invented leaded gasoline and the electrical starting motor and Freon, as well as the man who invented the pull-tab for aluminum cans – and that the city’s history of innovation and creative thinking has been cited as one reason why the Flyers took a chance on first-time head coach Archie Miller?

Did you know that, despite one four-win season and one six-win season in the 1990s and a two-year stretch in which the Flyers won one conference game, season ticket sales – tickets that have in some cases been passed through three generations of families – barely dipped?

Did you know that, the morning after Dayton upset Syracuse this March and went to its first Sweet 16 in 30 years, Father Dan Meyer, the priest at a local Catholic church, told his congregation that he wished he had red-and-blue Dayton Flyers vestments to wear at the pulpit?

Did you know that, when Memphis was flooded with thousands and thousands of Dayton supporters this March, a security guard turned to a man in Flyers gear and said, “My God, is anybody left in Dayton?”
 

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Discussion Starter #358
http://www.foxsports.com/college-basketball/story/there-s-way-more-to-dayton-basketball-than-you-think-110614

Good article on the history and what basketball means to Dayton.

There's way more to Dayton basketball than you think

The lineage of Dayton basketball officially began more than a century ago and has encompassed more than 1,500 wins, but it really began when a World War II naval officer named Tom Blackburn was hired as the school’s first full-time basketball coach and started to put Dayton on the map. And it really emerged nationally when one of Blackburn’s former players, Don Donoher – whose names graces the school’s current practice facility – took over the program and, in 1967, led the Flyers to the national title game, where they lost to Lew Alcindor and UCLA.

This is not to say John Miller was a tyrant. He was no Bobby Knight. But you definitely knew who was boss. Nor is it to say that his sons, both of whom led their teams to within a bounce or two of the Final Four last season, run their programs exactly the same way their father ran his teams. But the father’s attention to every single detail, that year-round obsession with working harder and getting better? You see that at Dayton, and at Arizona too. You see it in Archie Miller’s practices, where everything seems chaotic and competitive yet everything is organized to the minute. You see it in his results, where players like Devin Oliver, last season’s senior leader, transformed his game in four years. Just look at his three-point shooting accuracy: 16 percent his freshman year, 21 percent as a sophomore, 28 percent as a junior, 40 percent last year.

But what do you know about the University of Dayton?

Did you know that when Dayton went to its NIT title game back in 1951 the train station in town was jam-packed with fans, a mass exodus from Dayton to Madison Square Garden to watch their boys play?

Did you know that when the university’s old field house opened back in the 1950s, the school had to bring in extra bleachers from the football stadium to accommodate overflow crowds, and then the place sold out for the next two decades?

Did you know that Dayton is a city of inventors – the Wright Brothers, of course, but also the man who invented leaded gasoline and the electrical starting motor and Freon, as well as the man who invented the pull-tab for aluminum cans – and that the city’s history of innovation and creative thinking has been cited as one reason why the Flyers took a chance on first-time head coach Archie Miller?

Did you know that, despite one four-win season and one six-win season in the 1990s and a two-year stretch in which the Flyers won one conference game, season ticket sales – tickets that have in some cases been passed through three generations of families – barely dipped?

Did you know that, the morning after Dayton upset Syracuse this March and went to its first Sweet 16 in 30 years, Father Dan Meyer, the priest at a local Catholic church, told his congregation that he wished he had red-and-blue Dayton Flyers vestments to wear at the pulpit?

Did you know that, when Memphis was flooded with thousands and thousands of Dayton supporters this March, a security guard turned to a man in Flyers gear and said, “My God, is anybody left in Dayton?”
Great article and I thank the Daytonite that invented the pull tab aluminum can although I prefer a bottle or a pint glass.
 
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