Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
609 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Once upon a time (I spent a while thinking up that lead), to be a second-round pick in the NBA was a sign of many things -- few of them good. As Doc Rivers, picked 31st overall in 1983, remembered, ''It sucked. I thought I was better than all of them [drafted ahead of me]. But I think it was the best thing that ever happened to me. It put my ego back in check -- for my career. I'll never forget that."

There were some years when being a second-rounder wasn't so bad (1986, for instance) and other years when it pretty much was a death sentence.

Fast-forward to the 2005 NBA Draft.

''It was deep enough to have three rounds," says Leo Papile, the Celtics' assistant executive director of basketball operations. ''This was a senior-heavy draft with a tremendous value in the second round."

The Celtics have two players on their 15-man roster who were second-round picks last June: Ryan Gomes (No. 50) and Orien Greene (No. 53). Both have signed three-year deals, which second-rounders receive about as often as extended playing time. They also have a second-rounder from the year before in Justin Reed and the rights to the player taken immediately before Reed, Albert Miralles. And the last second-rounder taken in the pre-Danny Ainge era, Darius Songaila, has been a valuable NBA role player for Sacramento and Chicago. (He also played the same part for Lithuania in international competitions.)

It's not as if the 20 second-rounders have been bench warmers. In the first 10 days of the 2005-06 season, second-rounder Salim Stoudamire (Atlanta) ranked third among all rookie scorers. Second-rounder Daniel Ewing of the surprising Clippers was eighth among rookies in assists. Stoudamire, Ewing, and Chris Taft (Golden State) are all averaging more than 14 minutes a game, more than at least 10 first-round picks are getting, including the Celtics' Gerald Green.

The Celtics are not alone in their rosy assessment of second-round talent in the last draft. Of the 30 players selected, 20 made Opening Night rosters, including two on the Pistons: Amir Johnson, at No. 56, and Alex Acker, at No. 60. Johnson was fresh out of high school.

Of the 10 second-rounders who were not on NBA rosters, most are believed to have found homes in FIBA locations around the planet. As they say, there's a country for everyone. (Some later second-rounders with unpronounceable names were taken with the express purpose of letting them stay overseas.)

Clearly, while first-rounders still get the guaranteed money (although it's now for only two years), the notion that a second-rounder is to be used as a future bargaining chip or as a training camp body is getting to be less and less the case.
Great article that really smashes that idiot's argument from CNN/SI to pieces:

http://www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/articles/2005/11/13/draftees_worth_a_second_look/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
This year's draft is really worth a second look. The second round draft picks really have talent and potential....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I'll go one better. What about undrafted free agents. I was suprised to see Sean Banks of Memphis make the Hornet's roster. Hasn't played yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
even undrafted players like shavlik randolph(rmb him?the underachieving bigman which managed to get UNC and duke to fight to get him) are getting more playing time than gerald green n antoine wright.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top