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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #22
GrandKenyon6 said:
Here's Reuters' response to all the fabricated photos, though I don't have the link to the doctored photos working. I'm not surprised at the fabrication, as it's nothing new. Just saddened by further decline in journalism...

08.07.06

Credibility?

Reuters admitted this image was also doctored Photo:
Reuters
click here to enlarge text

Reuters admits to more image manipulation

News organization withdraws photograph of Israeli fighter jet, admits
image was doctored, fires photographer. Reuters pledges 'tighter
editing procedure for images of the Middle East conflict'

Yaakov Lappin

Reuters has withdrawn a second photograph and admitted that the image
was doctored, following the emergence of new suspicions against
images provided by the news organization. On Sunday, Reuters admitted
that one of its photographers, Adnan Hajj, used software to distort
an image of smoke billowing from buildings in Beirut in order to
create the effect of more smoke and damage.

The latest image to face doubts is a photograph of an Israeli F-16
fighter jet over the skies of Lebanon, seen in the image firing off
"missiles during an air strike on Nabatiyeh," according to the
image's accompanying text provided by Reuters.

Reuters has recalled all photos by Adnan Hajj

The owner of the My Pet Jawa web log noted that the warplane in the
picture is actually firing defensive flares aimed at dealing with
anti-aircraft missiles.

Caught Red Handed

Reuters admits altering Beirut photo / Yaakov Lappin Reuters
withdraws photograph of Beirut after Air Force attack after US blogs,
photographers point out 'blatant evidence of manipulation.'

Full Story

In addition, the Jawa blog says the flares have been replicated by
Reuters, giving the impression that the jet was firing many
"missiles," thereby distortion the image.

"The F-16 in the photo is not firing missiles, but is rather dropping
chaffe or flares designed to be a decoy for surface to air missiles.
However, a close up (of) what Hajj calls "missiles" reveals that only
one flare has been dropped. The other two "flares" are simply copies
of the original," Shackleford wrote. "But what about the 'bombs' in
the photo? Here is a close up of them. Notice anything? That's right.
The top and bottom "bomb" are the same."


Another manipulated Reuters image

Following the accusations, Reuters conceded that a second image it
provided had been manipulated, and released a statement saying it had
recalled all photos by Hajj. "Reuters has withdrawn from its database
all photographs taken by Beirut-based freelance Adnan Hajj
after establishing that he had altered two images since the start of
the conflict between Israel and the Lebanese Hizbullah group," the
statement said.

The news outlet said that it discovered "in the last 24 hours that he
(Hajj) altered two photographs since the beginning of the conflict
between Israel and the Lebanese group Hizbullah," Reuters added.

“There is no graver breach of Reuters standards for our photographers
than the deliberate manipulation of an image", Reuters' statement
quoted Tom Szlukovenyi, Reuters Global Picture Editor, as saying.

'Tighter editing needed'

Reuters also said it would apply "tighter editing procedure for
images of the Middle East conflict to ensure that no photograph from
the region would be transmitted to subscribers without review by the
most senior editor on the Reuters Global Pictures Desk."


"Reuters terminated its relationship with Hajj on Sunday... An
immediate enquiry began into Hajj’s other work," the statement said.

Hajj had provided Reuters with several images from the Lebanese
village of Qana, many of which have also been suspected of being
staged .

Other Reuters images have been called into question by blogs in the
United States.

A reader of the Power Line blog , Robert Opalecky, wrote: "I don't
know if this has been brought to anyone's attention yet, but in a
quick search of the authenticated Reuters photographs attributed to
Adnan Hajj, I found the following two."



The first Reuters image of July 24

"One is from July 24 of a bombed out area in Beirut, with a clearly
identifiable building in a prominent part of the shot. The second is
of the exact same area, same buildings, same condition, with a woman
walking past "a building flattened during an overnight Israeli air
raid on Beirut's suburbs August 5, 2006," he wrote.

Reuters' second 'Beirut attack' photo, dated August 5

A film released on the YouTube video sharing website compares the two
images, and appears to show striking similarities between the
photograph used by Reuters on both July 24 and August 5.




Reuters withdraws all photos by freelancer

Mon Aug 7, 12:20 PM ET

Reuters withdrew all 920 photographs by a freelance Lebanese
photographer from its database on Monday after an urgent review of
his work showed he had altered two images from the conflict between
Israel and the armed group Hizbollah.

Global Picture Editor Tom Szlukovenyi called the measure
precautionary but said the fact that two of the images by
photographer Adnan Hajj had been manipulated undermined trust in his
entire body of work.

"There is no graver breach of Reuters standards for our photographers
than the deliberate manipulation of an image," Szlukovenyi said in a
statement.

"Reuters has zero tolerance for any doctoring of pictures and
constantly reminds its photographers, both staff and freelance, of
this strict and unalterable policy."

The news and information agency announced the decision in an advisory
note to its photo service subscribers. The note also said Reuters had
tightened editing procedures for photographs from the conflict and
apologized for the case.

Removing the images from the Reuters database excludes them from future
sale.

Reuters ended its relationship with Hajj on Sunday after it found
that a photograph he had taken of the aftermath of an Israeli air
strike on suburban Beirut had been manipulated using Photoshop
software to show more and darker smoke rising from buildings.

An immediate enquiry began into Hajj's other work.

It established on Monday that a photograph of an Israeli F-16 fighter
over Nabatiyeh, southern Lebanon and dated Aug 2, had also been
doctored to increase the number of flares dropped by the plane from
one to three.

"Manipulating photographs in this way is entirely unacceptable and
contrary to all the principles consistently held by Reuters
throughout its long and distinguished history. It undermines not only
our reputation but also the good name of all our photographers,"
Szlukovenyi said.

"This doesn't mean that every one of his 920 photographs in our
database was altered. We know that not to be the case from the
majority of images we have looked at so far but we need to act
swiftly and in a precautionary manner."

The two altered photographs were among 43 that Hajj filed directly to
the Reuters Global Pictures Desk since the start of the conflict on
July 12 rather than through an editor in Beirut, as was the case with
the great majority of his images.

Filing drills have been tightened in Lebanon and only senior staff
will now edit pictures from the Middle East on the Global Pictures
Desk, with the final check undertaken by the Editor-in-Charge,
Reuters said.

Hajj worked for Reuters as a non-staff contributing photographer from
1993 until 2003 and again since April 2005. Most of his work was in
sports photography, much of it outside Lebanon.

Hajj was not in Beirut on Monday and was not responding to calls. He
told Reuters on Sunday that the image of the Israeli air strike on
Beirut had dust marks which he had wanted to remove.

Questions about the accuracy of the photograph arose after it
appeared on news Web sites on Saturday.

Several blogs, including a number which accuse the media of distorted
coverage of the Middle East conflict, said the photograph had been
doctored.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/mideast_reuters_dc
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #23
ClippersRuleLA said:
damn i didnt know that. can you provide a link for this?
It's primarily derived from records captured by Israel when it surrounded Arafat's compound, though there were many who believed that he had it in the works well before then due to the speed and coordination with which the intifada erupted. I'll see if I can search back and at least get some names and document sources for you.
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #24
An interesting admission by a top Fatah leader as to the Oslo Accords' purpose:

A PLO Leader: Oslo Accords Led to Palestinian Violence
******************************************************

memri.org


The Middle East Media and Research Institute made available today
(both as a video clip and a transcript) portions of a television
interview excerpt with Ziyad Abu `Ein, a member of the Fatah
leadership in which he mused on the benefits for Palestinian of the
Oslo Accords. The interview took place on Al-`Alam Television on July
4, 2006:

The Oslo Accords were not what the Palestinian people dreamt of. The
dream of the Palestinian people is the return, self-determination,
the establishment of an independent Palestinian state, and the
liberation of its land.

However, there would have been no resistance in Palestine if not for
Oslo. It was Oslo that strongly embraced the Palestinian resistance.
All the occupied territories - and I was one of the activists in the
first and second Intifadas, and I was arrested by Israel several
times ... If not for Oslo, there would have been no resistance.

Throughout the occupied territories, we could not move a single
pistol from one place to another. If not for Oslo, the weapons we got
through Oslo, and if not for the "A" areas of the Palestinian
Authority, if not for the training, the camps, the protection
provided by Oslo, and if not for the release of thousands of
Palestinian prisoners through Oslo - this Palestinian resistance
could not have carried out this great Palestinian Intifada, with
which we confronted the Israeli occupation.
 

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I don't know if this has been asked:

Do you sincerely believe that the arab's hate towards jews could end if Israel gave up all "occupied territory"?
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #26
PauloCatarino said:
I don't know if this has been asked:

Do you sincerely believe that the arab's hate towards jews could end if Israel gave up all "occupied territory"?
If by "occupied territory" you include all of Israel, then yes. It has nothing to do with specific territory, and everything to do with a fundamental sense of entitlement that the Arab nations (and Organization of Islamic Conferences in the UN) feels regarding any land they deem 'important.'

A week ago I attended a symposium on the UN and Beyond in NYC. Bernard Lewis gave the greatest summation of the UN's utter failure I've ever encountered.

He said that the day the UN became a joke was not after the Cold War ended, as most of the day's other speakers believed, but May 15, 1948. The UN, as successor to the League of Nations, had full and complete legal title to the Mandate of Palestine, that the British had attempted to govern, under the aegis of the by-then defunct League. This is the crucial point - the land belonged to no one but the UN - whose determination was law. Whatever was to come had to legally come from the UN - and no one else.

The UN, of course, chose to partition the land, and to form a Jewish and Arab state in the land. The Jews consented, as we all know - albeit with misgivings. The Arab states, who had no valid claim to the land or its people, defied the UN - and were allowed to get away with it. It was at that point that the UN was either going to enforce its authority or not. And it failed, abjectly. The UN partition plan called for an autonomous Arab state, with self-determination for its inhabitants. That right was immediately taken away. Not by the Jews, but the the Arab states who had no right under the law to do so. It was the UN's call to make, and it allowed its decision to be loudly ignored. At this point it ceased to be anything more than the old League of Nations in terms of authority.

And the mode of thought that impelled the Arab League to flaunt the UN then is still at play now. There are easy examples, such as the fact that the surrounding Arab states have called for Israel's destruction since 1948 - well before there were any 'occupied territories.' Or the fact that Hezbollah's ludicrous and laughable 'claim' to the Shebaa Farms is somehow afforded weight when as a legal basis it would border on the frivolous. Or the fact that before Israel was reborn, beginning in the late 19th century, the Islamic world didn't give a damn about Israel or Jerusalem. But once the Jews had the temerity to return, suddenly it was a 'holy city to Islam' once more, after centuries of neglect and forgetfulness.

It's not about territory, it's about a group of nations that have been allowed to dictate terms for decades, in a flagrant double standard. For all the claims that "Israel has no right to exist" the fact is that the valid legal determination was made by the UN, in full accordance with international law. But the UN essentially 'chose' to cater to the whims of dictators rather than uphold its own charter, much less establish the authority that it was initially (perhaps latently) endowed with. And so decades have passed, wherein the OIC, its member states and their terrorist proxies have been allowed to twist away from reality and law, in favor of their own baseless claims. That in turn reinforces their own illegal conviction that they have any right to dictate the terms of Israel's existence. As they are allowed to do so, so does their hatred grow.

The only thing that would happen if Israel withdrew completely from the territories would be horrible borders for the Jewish State. Anyone who tries to state that the problem would go away after that is either ignorant, lying, or a fool. And if you want further proof, look at the so-called 'right of return' that was first brought up in 2000 by Yassir Arafat. Ehud Barak was offering 98% of the West Bank and Gaza, and even was willing to place Jerusalem on the table. Arafat needed something on which to base a refusal of the nearly complete accession to his terms. And so he invented a demand that Palestinians be accorded the 'right' to 'return' to their ostensible homes - within Israel proper.

... the territories are a convenient smokescreen and lightning rod, but they're not what it's all about. It's about whether the OIC has the right to dictate what nations exist within the sphere it has decided to claim as its own. And Israel, the Jewish State, could never meet their requirements.
 

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Thanx for the response.

It seems to me that what you are saying is something next to: Arabs will only stop hating jews if no jews are around them.

Is that a correct assessment?
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #28
PauloCatarino said:
Thanx for the response.

It seems to me that what you are saying is something next to: Arabs will only stop hating jews if no jews are around them.

Is that a correct assessment?
I would clarify by stating that the Arab states will stop hating Jews if there is no Israel. History shows that, at times, when Jews were dhimmi, they were tolerated, more or less. But much of the hate comes from above - from governments and mosques alike. It's a great unifier for the demagogues, whether secular or religious.

Interestingly, the totalitarian dictatorships that characterize the Arab world today are not, as many believe, an indigenous Arab concept, nor an outgrowth of Islam. Lewis also made this clear, placing the origination of this mindset squarely within the timeframe of the British/French conquest of the Middle East. As it was far more useful to the British to have one strongman under them rather than many petty chieftans, they ensured (as did the French) that one would be raised above the others, and be beholden to them. In Israel itself during the Mandatory period, there were numerous instances of muktars being friendly with their Jewish neighbors - until the Mufti and similarly aligned terrorist gangs managed to cow the small village leaders into submission. This was a benefit for the British, and no one else, as the villages were compelled to serve as bases for terrorist activities, and the people began to be led down the path of corrupt and uncaring 'leaders' that are in power to this day.
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #30
ClippersRuleLA said:
what do you know of the Tribe of Judea and their decendants?

what do you know about the decendants of the other Lost Tribes of Israel?
I suppose that it depends on what exactly you refer to as the 'Tribe of Judea.' The actual tribe was never lost, but forms the core of the Jewish people to this day, from which our name is derived. Since you are aware of this, I have the feeling you're referring to some other group.

As far as the Lost Tribes go, they are lost - period. The Tribes that comprised the Kindgom of Israel conquered by the Assyrians were dispersed to the point of nonexistence. (Though I admit that certain central Asian tribes have shown evidence of linkage) This is not to ignore the existence of other Jewish offshoots, such as the Ethiopian Jewish community, Indian Jews, or evern the descendants of Chinese Jews that were totally integrated by the end of the first quarter of the past century. Generally speaking, these are all held to be either the descendants of non-Tribal converts (in the case of Ethiopia) or the remnants of communities founded by Jewish traders of antiquity (the Jews of India and China).

I have a nagging feeling that you're really asking another question entirely, so I'll stop and wait for clarification before I keep babbling about something you already know. :D
 

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Krstic All Star said:
I have a nagging feeling that you're really asking another question entirely, so I'll stop and wait for clarification before I keep babbling about something you already know. :D
you are refering to the tribe of Judea that i was questioning about but i am curious of how many of todays Jews came from Judea because i found information(even though it is wikipedia) that some Jewish groups say they are the descendants of the Lost Tribes.
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #32
ClippersRuleLA said:
you are refering to the tribe of Judea that i was questioning about but i am curious of how many of todays Jews came from Judea because i found information(even though it is wikipedia) that some Jewish groups say they are the descendants of the Lost Tribes.
Interesting...

The Kingdom of Judea consisted mainly of the Tribes of Judah and Binyamin, as well as the Levites that served in the Temple. As a general rule, Jews are considered descendants of Judah - in all likelihood.

The groups like the Beta Israel are fascinating - and there's no simple answer. In the secular history courses I've taken that dealt with the subject, the general feeling was that the groups were not from the lost tribes, but trading colonies and the like. It is not entirely outside the realm of possibility though that some of the groups were in fact from the Kingdom of Israel. I'm skeptical.

As far as the assorted miscellaneous groups claiming Jewish heritage go, most are off the wall, such as the Anglo-Israelites - or the 'Black Jews' one often sees on streetcorners claiming that the Caribbean is somehow Jewish... On the other hand, the Kurds have always fascinated me, and not least for the 'Cohen gene' that many of them seem to have. Of course that wouldn't really necessitate their being of the Lost Tribes, as the overwhelming majority of Cohanim lived in Jerusalem, in order to fulfil their priestly duties. It's very likely that the Babylonian Exile, from which only a small percentage of Jews returned to Israel, is responsible for many of those in the Middle East and further claiming Jewish heritage. As well, one cannot discount the possibility that Alexander the Great had Jews accompany him on his expeditions eastward - though there's no real evidence of that that I'm aware of.

Ultimately, I can say with certainty only that the obvious crackpot groups are such. For the ones with real connections, there is the possibility - and I don't think anyone can say for certain.
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #33
Some interesting info, related to lost tribes (received via e-mail):

THE RETURN TO ZION OF A LOST TRIBE OF ISRAEL

Letter from Ruth Matar (Women in Green) Jerusalem
Thursday, October 5, 2006

Dear Friends,

After many centuries of wandering in exile, some 218 members of the
tribe of Bnei Menashe are coming home to Zion. Israel's Sephardic
Chief Rabbi Shlomo Amar has officially declared Bnei Menashe
"descendants of the Jewish people."

Michael Freund, founder of Shavei Israel (Return to Israel), which
assists "Lost Jews" seeking to return to the Jewish people, said:

"This is a major historical event, because these members of a lost
tribe of Israel, after 27 centuries of wandering in exile, will at
last be coming home...."

We owe special thanks to Michael Freund, who has worked passionately
and untiringly to make Isaiah's prophecy come true (Isaiah 49:22).

If you would like to know more about this veritable miracle, Michael
Freund will be happy to share his knowledge with you. His email
address is: [email protected] .
 

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I have another question for you: what are the relations between post-Saddam Iraq and Israel today and what are the relations between Kurdistan Region and Israel? (I remember that in 2004, Chalabi, who was an important politician at that time and had established close ties with Jewish-American groups, visited Israel to explore "future horizons" in Iraqi-Israeli relations. But since Chalabi has been 'out of the game' (according to wikipedia, he is currently under investigation by several U.S. government sources) I didn't hear much about Iraq-Israel (diplomatic?) relationship).
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #35
sadam said:
I have another question for you: what are the relations between post-Saddam Iraq and Israel today and what are the relations between Kurdistan Region and Israel? (I remember that in 2004, Chalabi, who was an important politician at that time and had established close ties with Jewish-American groups, visited Israel to explore "future horizons" in Iraqi-Israeli relations. But since Chalabi has been 'out of the game' (according to wikipedia, he is currently under investigation by several U.S. government sources) I didn't hear much about Iraq-Israel (diplomatic?) relationship).
Well, due to Iraq's already strained standing within the Arab world, there's simply not much there. Even Chalabi wasn't going to be able to forge anything significant. The only chance for real Iraqi-Israeli relations won't come for a while, well after Iraq's internal situation is settled.

Kurdistan is more intriguing, but there's also very little connection. While Israel has supported the Kurds in the past, and certainly feel empathy for the Kurdish situation (not to mention seeing the Kurds as a potentially significant ally), the fact is that Israel's relationship with Turkey precludes any real diplomacy - at least anything publicly known.
 

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It's me again. :) In another thread I was talking about terrorists and freedom fighters. There I gave few examples of 'self-interest' and 'double standards' when calling someone a terrorist. And then I mentioned Menachem Begin (Irgun Zvei Leumi). I must admit that I don't know much about him, but I heard that he was a person considered and called a terrorist by the British when he waged war against them and was later Israel's Prime Minister. Now I'm little confused. I mean, can we say that Israel is a state founded by terrorists? That sounds weird. Even today, whether he was a terrorist or not is still debated. I'm sure you know much more about it. I heard that many Zionists believed that his terrorist activities were legitimate ways to achieve their political objectives. But the same people don't think that way about the armed Palestinians groups under their occupation. So I'm interested what is your opinion about him and where do you see the difference (if you see) between his 'terrorism' and the 'terrorism' threat (from Hamas) that Israel is facing today?
 

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Legal Smeagol
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Discussion Starter #37
It's me again. :) In another thread I was talking about terrorists and freedom fighters. There I gave few examples of 'self-interest' and 'double standards' when calling someone a terrorist. And then I mentioned Menachem Begin (Irgun Zvei Leumi). I must admit that I don't know much about him, but I heard that he was a person considered and called a terrorist by the British when he waged war against them and was later Israel's Prime Minister. Now I'm little confused. I mean, can we say that Israel is a state founded by terrorists? That sounds weird. Even today, whether he was a terrorist or not is still debated. I'm sure you know much more about it. I heard that many Zionists believed that his terrorist activities were legitimate ways to achieve their political objectives. But the same people don't think that way about the armed Palestinians groups under their occupation. So I'm interested what is your opinion about him and where do you see the difference (if you see) between his 'terrorism' and the 'terrorism' threat (from Hamas) that Israel is facing today?
First off, having someone once accused of being a terrorist become a nation's leader decades after it was created is far enough from its founding that saying it's a state 'founded by terrorists' is ridiculous on its face.

More importantly, the term terrorism was used very differently in those days, referring even more to a tactical form of guerrilla warfare. The British so termed him because of his willingness to attack any and all British military targets, without regard to whether they were otherwise 'fair game' in military theory of the time. What he did NOT do was go out and target civilians to bring about change, but in fact the direct opposite. His goal was to make the Mandatory government realize that they were fair game - by attacking them directly. And bear in mind that he was the only Israeli who could have signed the peace treaty with Egypt without incurring a backlash like the one that resulted in the death of Rabin.

The closest parallel you could possibly find would be Lochamei Herut Yisrael, also known as the Stern Group and Stern Gang. They were much less restrained than IZL, and were particularly vicious - but still not of an order of a Hamas.
 

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Arab Israeli arrested for driving on Jewish holiday
Israeli police arrested an Arab Israeli man who drove his car during the Yom Kippur holiday in an incident which sparked four nights of rioting in the northern town of Acre, police said on Tuesday.

"Tawfik Jamal was remanded in custody for three days for reckless endangerment and harming religious sensitivities," said police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld.

Jamal, who was detained on Monday night, had earlier apologised for driving on October 8 during the Yom Kippur Jewish holiday when virtually all of Israel respects a religious ban on driving and observant Jews fast and pray.

Arab-Israeli MP Ahmad Tibi sharply criticised the arrest.

"It is the first time anyone is arrested for harming religious sensitivities," he said, urging police to immediately release Jamal so as not to exacerbate tensions.

"Police caved in to pressure from the fascist right which demanded his arrest, demonstrating it is a Jewish, racist and idiotic police," Tibi told AFP. "I wonder if the Israeli government will in future arrest Jews who eat or drink in mixed cities during Ramadan," he said in reference to the Muslim month of fasting. ...
While I didn't want to open another thread on 'political economy' forum(since I don't find it that important and we've already had similar threads in the past), I would still like to hear your opinion about that incident. I must admit I don't know much about Jewish culture and their calendar, so I don't know what 'Yom Kippur' actually means and how imporant it really is for Jews, but I was quite surprised when I heard about the arrest. I mean, do you find arresting a person for 'offending religion' (and not commiting an actual crime) normal and fair? Isn't it similar as if Jews would get arrested for eating on Ramadan?
 

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And while I'm already here I'm going to ask you another question; hope you don't mind :) .

I'm not even sure if you're the right person to answer it, because this time my question is not about Israel, it is about the religion - Judaism. You see, last month I watched an interesting documentary about religion, which was focused on 'forces of evil', like demons, devils and fallen angels. As you probably know, in Christianity, Beelzebub appears as an alternate name for Lucifer - the fallen angel. It was said that the existence and role of Lucifer and fallen angels differs from one religion to another in many aspects. And my question goes: does Judaism believe in Fallen Angels and Hell?
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Arab Israeli arrested for driving on Jewish holiday
While I didn't want to open another thread on 'political economy' forum(since I don't find it that important and we've already had similar threads in the past), I would still like to hear your opinion about that incident. I must admit I don't know much about Jewish culture and their calendar, so I don't know what 'Yom Kippur' actually means and how imporant it really is for Jews, but I was quite surprised when I heard about the arrest. I mean, do you find arresting a person for 'offending religion' (and not commiting an actual crime) normal and fair? Isn't it similar as if Jews would get arrested for eating on Ramadan?
Yom Kippur is THE holiest day in Judaism by far. In fact, there are two prohibitions for the day where, if a Jew violates them, he suffers the ultimate divine punishmen, Caret, literally to be cut off (either in this world, or worse yet, to be cut of from God for eternity).

However, much as I despise Tibi and virtually everything he says, I disagree vehemently with holding others to one's own religious standard. I do not accept it when Muslims try to hold Christians accountable for 'blaspheming Islam' and I do not accept this man getting a ticket - no matter how many riots erupt. He didn't attack anyone, HE DROVE A CAR - much as anyone who isn't Jewish may do even on Yom Kippur. In fact, I find those who rioted to be guilty of Chillul Hashem, desecrating God's name, by their actions.
 
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