Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

4081 - 4100 of 4414 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,597 Posts
There are 11 teams in the conference and 4 America East members, where the heck are the other two votes coming from, presuming this only needs a simple majority?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
33,160 Posts
How long is Amy going to lead the AE as well? I feel like she's been the best commish the conference has had. Have to imagine she's going to be moving onwards and upwards at some point; she's pretty impressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
There are 11 teams in the conference and 4 America East members, where the heck are the other two votes coming from, presuming this only needs a simple majority?
Probably Merrimack could be easily persuaded. Out of that remaining 6...maybe UMass Amherst would be willing to since they partner with other leagues (CAA Lax - maybe they'd be willing to trade for AE Lax which is just as good if not better than CAA Lax I believe and on a lot stronger footing).

Or you've got the nightmare scenario where the 4 AE schools + Merrimack are pushing this and the UConn/UMass/Providence/BU/BC/Northeastern group says eff this, 6 is enough to start our own damn conference, much like WCHA did to boot the Alaska schools and Alabama Huntsville, leaving the AE grouping screwed and having to poach from Atlantic Hockey to fill out a new league. Extremely low chance of this happening (I don't think those schools really want to be without UNH and Maine) but in theory, it could.
 

·
Gr8t Dane
Joined
·
711 Posts
There hasn't been much news about this lately, but how does D1 athletes being able to get paid for their likeness fall into all this?

I could see a scenario where we start to see some conferences merging to pool resources and better compete.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,033 Posts
There hasn't been much news about this lately, but how does D1 athletes being able to get paid for their likeness fall into all this?

I could see a scenario where we start to see some conferences merging to pool resources and better compete.
I think the NCAA is trying to figure that out themselves, which is why none of this went into effect right away. They're trying to figure out a way to not create an even bigger talent gap, and I think if any player gets paid, it would come from outside sources, i.e. local commercials from sponsors, social media income and, (please God) the return of the video games.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,833 Posts
Discussion Starter #4,086
I'm not sure what the big deal is here with this AE/Hockey East thing. Does it really matter which league it is? Would teams REALLY leave because of a name change? I don't think that the hockey fortunes of any of the 11 members are going to c change because the patch on their uniform says America East instead of Hockey East. The people that thumb their noses at this league are a joke. Take a look at the other schools......BC, UMass, UConn....all are becoming a shell of their former athletic selves because they ended up in f'd up conference situations because of football.......yet they have the gall to throw darts at AE? This league has become the most stable league on the East Coast which is truly ironic! BU....who cares? The Patriot has done nothing for them athletically.....their women's programs have gone down the tubes since they left AE. Northeastern.....well all 17 of their fans probably would support them no matter which league they were/are in. Merrimack......yeah, they have a ton of bargaining power.....NOT!

If 2 of the 3 SUNYs started hockey programs.....I would fully support Maine, UNH, Vermont and Lowell bolting HE to form a 6 team hockey conference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Update on the AE/Hockey East thing. Sounds unlikely. The AE made a pitch to share marketing, web hosting and office space, and that might be as far as it goes.

From the article below:

"The commissioner search could be complicated by the involvement of an all-sport conference, though sources tell CHN that is highly unlikely. Hockey East's athletic directors recently heard a pitch from America East, to share resources such as marketing, office space and web hosting. While sharing resources remains a possibility, sources said any agreement with America East, if there is any, wouldn't go beyond that.

"(Other schools) give this (idea) a big eye roll and single out Lowell as pushing that agenda," a source told CHN."


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,833 Posts
Discussion Starter #4,088
Update on the AE/Hockey East thing. Sounds unlikely. The AE made a pitch to share marketing, web hosting and office space, and that might be as far as it goes.

From the article below:

"The commissioner search could be complicated by the involvement of an all-sport conference, though sources tell CHN that is highly unlikely. Hockey East's athletic directors recently heard a pitch from America East, to share resources such as marketing, office space and web hosting. While sharing resources remains a possibility, sources said any agreement with America East, if there is any, wouldn't go beyond that.

"(Other schools) give this (idea) a big eye roll and single out Lowell as pushing that agenda," a source told CHN."


Good for Lowell!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,237 Posts
Wow, that was a scathing article...and basically stuff that every single person has been thinking for years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,459 Posts

UConn looking to reduce their number of programs from 24 to the FBS minimum 16. Do they still think staying FBS is a good idea?
It is reporting on a Hartford Courant columnist urging UConn to drop 8 sports. My less than fully informed opinion is that the wiser solution would be to drop football completely. With the move to the Big East, the cost of all their non-football sports comes way down.

UConn (and UMass, for that matter) have needed an excuse to get out of FBS football (and possibly any football) for years. The financial crisis coming out of C-19 provides the cover to do it.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,033 Posts
I've been saying it for years, Amy had a chance when UConn made the move back to the Big East, the AE had an opportunity for football. Now, here's another chance, and the truth is, with that footprint from Maine to Stony Brook, include UConn, UMass, and URI, it makes more sense to leave the CAA behind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
I've been saying it for years, Amy had a chance when UConn made the move back to the Big East, the AE had an opportunity for football. Now, here's another chance, and the truth is, with that footprint from Maine to Stony Brook, include UConn, UMass, and URI, it makes more sense to leave the CAA behind.
Just remember anything a conference commissioner does at this level, while they can get ideas and things rolling, they do everything at the behest of its members' presidents and ADs. And, it's a two-way street...UConn and UMass have to want that, and I'm going to guess that's not on the table for them and the "this is fine" meme is in full force with those schools in relation to FBS football. I also think that the AE football schools are happy with the CAA setup, which functions completely as a different entity from the all-sports CAA. Not that what you're saying isn't true...my feeling is unless a hail mary happens, AE Football has sailed forever.

However, I will say that it is funny how a few months back the AE/Hockey East shared marketing/resources thing came out. Those of us here understood that made sense, but for the BCs, Providences, UConn, UMass fans of the world that was seen as "lowly" even though nothing about the name would change, nor would the prestige. I do wonder if that gets revisited, and the growing reality is going to be like that article I brought up a month or two ago about power 5 schools prioritizing 4-5 sports and then allowing its secondary sports in regional competition to save money. Question becomes what do these Power 5/Group of 5 league value? Basketball and football, if they have it, are the givens, but then with the SEC it's baseball/softball...the Big East it's basketball....and?? They've only got 7 baseball schools, Denver is in their lax conference....might they just make the decision to dump sponsorship of those sports and let their members join other leagues? Not to mention sports like swimming, volleyball, field hockey, which if they even make it through my guess is they'd rather those be bus league sports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,237 Posts
I agree with all that but I would probably not include volleyball. That is a sport that is gaining in popularity around the country and has actually started to take a pretty good dent out of girls playing basketball. The numbers, in California in particular, are pretty eye-opening (trying to locate the article I read a few months ago but unsuccessful thus far). I know the Big Ten, the Pac-12 and SEC have incredible programs and I have seen a LOT more volleyball being televised in the last couple of years than ever before. As a relatively inexpensive sport, I don't see any conference really wanting to part with that at the current moment. I don't see it as a sport that many current schools will drop at the moment either due to the lower cost in addition to the Title IX numbers that it provides schools.
 
  • Like
Reactions: catpower

·
Registered
Joined
·
562 Posts
Volleyball has always been extremely popular in California, for both men and women. I'm not sure what evidence there is for "growing" in popularity.

What I do see is the rise of popular in men's volleyball, which previously was largely a West coast sport. Vermont HS started sponsoring boys volleyball a few years ago (girls volleyball was always a very popular sport in these parts), and you can see its really taking off. It seemed like boys volleyball was first explored to provide an athletics avenue for nerdy high school boys, but now mainstream, athletic boys are taking part in large numbers.

You run into Title IX issues though with men's volleyball, as women's VB is often treated like Field Hockey or women's swimming to offset Football (obviously), but also men's hockey and basketball in non-football schools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,684 Posts
What I do see is the rise of popular in men's volleyball, which previously was largely a West coast sport. Vermont HS started sponsoring boys volleyball a few years ago (girls volleyball was always a very popular sport in these parts), and you can see its really taking off. It seemed like boys volleyball was first explored to provide an athletics avenue for nerdy high school boys, but now mainstream, athletic boys are taking part in large numbers.
Not sure what you define as "these parts." VPA sponsorship of boys and girls volleyball happened the same year (Fall 2016 was the first varsity season, I believe). Last year there were 8 boys teams and 13 girls teams: I know 1-2 of those boys programs are new in the last season or two, whereas that girls number has been pretty steady from the beginning.

By some measure, it's definitely "new" to Vermont...at least at the competitive high school level. 20-25 years ago, nobody was seriously playing volleyball and your school's "volleyball club" (if such a thing existed) was mostly limited to a bunch of rando kids who didn't play other sports and weren't even that good at volleyball.

Just spitballing, but there might be some more room for growth for the boys game as it pertains to the continued decline of football (which is even more pronounced here than it is nationally). If some of these skill-position type athletes start moving away from football and need a non-soccer outlet they can pick up quickly, volleyball could be a move for some of the mid-to-large schools that don't already sponsor it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,237 Posts
Volleyball has always been extremely popular in California, for both men and women. I'm not sure what evidence there is for "growing" in popularity.
My point wasn't that volleyball is popular in California, but rather that there is now evidence in several states across the country that more and more girls are playing volleyball and that participation levels have exceeded or matched basketball in many states. In addition, there were girls that were choosing volleyball over basketball. There have been many reasons suggested, but one had to do with the risk of an ACL injury. While obviously you can get hurt in volleyball (concussions are an issue), the risk of tearing your ACL seemed quite a bit less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
I agree with all that but I would probably not include volleyball. That is a sport that is gaining in popularity around the country and has actually started to take a pretty good dent out of girls playing basketball. The numbers, in California in particular, are pretty eye-opening (trying to locate the article I read a few months ago but unsuccessful thus far). I know the Big Ten, the Pac-12 and SEC have incredible programs and I have seen a LOT more volleyball being televised in the last couple of years than ever before. As a relatively inexpensive sport, I don't see any conference really wanting to part with that at the current moment. I don't see it as a sport that many current schools will drop at the moment either due to the lower cost in addition to the Title IX numbers that it provides schools.
For sure, with volleyball it just comes down to who values it and who doesn't, which is at the heart of the issue and the future of some of these conferences.

I think what I'm wondering is a league like the Big East...outside basketball and soccer, what other sports do they offer that's appealing to make them want to keep sponsorship of all of them? Baseball has just 6 teams. Lax is 4 members and 2 affliates on the women's side and 5+1 on the men's, both including University of Denver...field hockey it's got a future all sports member (UConn), but also out of an 8-team league only half will actually be full members when UConn officially joins. How much does the Big East want to invest something for administrative oversight and whatnot only half its teams sponsor, or in non-revenue sports where they might have to fly the men's and women's tennis teams from Omaha to Providence and the other way around?

Whether it means olympic/non-revenue sports just begin to create new leagues/classifications while moving to a regional model, or there's the return of "open classification" which is currently true in women's hockey and men's and women's skiing (no divisions, which is why some D2 teams were allowed to go D1 in women's hockey last year/skiing has teams from all three divisions), there's going to have to be a lot of conversations and probably it's going to lead to a lot of changes in how many of these sports are set up under the NCAA's umbrella.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
The UConn financial situation is not materially different than the American East situation. According to a 2017-2018 database produced by Indiana University and published in USA today, UConn NCAA sports lost $39 million that year. The same year, on the same database, Stoney Brook lost $26 million, UNH lost $23 million, Albany lost $18 million, UMass Lowell lost $18 million and UVM lost $16 million.

For most of the AE schools, the athletics loss per enrolled student is comparable or higher than the loss per enrolled student at UConn. UConn athletics loses $1,625 per enrolled student per year and UNH athletics loses $1,800 per enrolled student per year. UConn losses are not an outlier.

At some point, mid-major conferences and schools need to demand the NCAA let them pick which of their sports operate at div 1 and which of their sports operate at div 3 level. With NCAA corporate at a somewhat weakened point and the power five exercising its muscles, this may be the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,771 Posts
There are some schools now who are div1 for one sport like hockey or soccer, and div3 for all others. Something like this makes the most sense to me financially but it does make life harder for a lot of student athletes in other sports. Right now there is such financial pressure that I do wonder what will survive with scholarship support.
 
4081 - 4100 of 4414 Posts
Top