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I'm pretty sure that a lot of the foreigners that come to the league have been playing professional ball pretty young. I believe Tony Parker was pro @14! Anybody who knows holla back.
 

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Players usually sign their first pro-contracts at the age of 14-16. If the young players is good enough why should we prevent them earning the money?

I guess we foreigners don't need so much restrictions and guidance...sorry Americans :)
 
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In Europe, when you're ready, you're ready. Plus, as I understand it, all the teams are pro teams. Its a club system that feeds directly into the play for pay leagues.
 

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That is an interesting point. Remember the big tadoo Freddy Adu caused in american soccer signing a contract so young, when really that's general practice across the rest of the world.

I think most of the foreign countries have good development systems in place though.

Which begs the question, why can't the NBA have similiar systems?

We have this whole conception of amatuerism in the United States that we hold to pretty puritanically. But I wonder how much it might help society overall if we made sports completely professional? No more student athletes, just students or athletes?
 

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futuristxen said:
We have this whole conception of amatuerism in the United States that we hold to pretty puritanically. But I wonder how much it might help society overall if we made sports completely professional? No more student athletes, just students or athletes?
things are alot different in europe. athletes over there make far, far less than athletes do over here, exception being soccer players, in which you dont see to many 15 year olds in the english premier league. if you had the same thing here in the US, you'd just have crazy parents trying to mold their kids into the next lebron at age 5. not really good for society.
 

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there's no age limit in europe
 

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That is an interesting question indeed , but I have to disagree concerning Tony Parker . When he was just 15 years old , he was playing for the main French BBall school , a sport institute called " INSEP" ( national institute for sport and physical education) . he was not a pro back then , yet used to play against older players in third league . Later on , when he was 17 , he signed his first pro contract in Paris .

Some extremely precocious players plays in Pro teams even before they turn 17 but in general they have not yet signed a Pro contract . Not having signed a pro contract , they are not considered as pro , eventhough they do play with a pro team .

I insist on this point because I know that this nuance is thin and can lead to troubles in NCAA for instance . Some young french bball players , who had not signed pro contract , but who had played in pro teams , had to spend one year as red-shirt because the NCAA suspected that they had played pro before playing in college . In fact , they were "apprentices" and earned a small '"compensation" (not a real salary) . This is only juridic nuance though .
 

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I think most of the foreign countries have good development systems in place though.

Which begs the question, why can't the NBA have similiar systems?
Futuristxen got it right, IMO. In Europe, you can start playing for a club at an age of 8, should you want to. Of course, it won't be professional, but it is organised to an extent. You learn fundamentals at an early age. And it sticks with you better ...

Then, you can go on and sign a contract. Most of the players generally do it at an age of 16, more talented ones earlier. Mind you, even if they sign a professional contract with a club, they can still participate in the youth competitions (or minor leagues). For example, if I'm a really talented 14-year old, not good enough to make the first team in League A, I can still play for youth competitions for that team, while getting paid as a professional.

Now, the way things are in the NBA, it is NOT a good thing to allow young players into the league. There is no minor league/youth team in the NBA; if you're not ready, you could get stuck on the bench, and at age of 18, you need playing time in order to develop. Furthermore, since there are so many games in the NBA, you have no time no practice either!

The great example of this is Darko Milicic. He didn't come ready to the NBA, and while extremely talented (and unlucky too, should I add), he never got a chance to improve. While on the other hand, you got Nenad Krstic, who waited until he was ready. Had Krstic come when he was 18, his fate would have mirrored Darko. In fact, Darko at 16 was a better player than Krstic at 18. But look at them now ...

In essence, the NBA should either:
- Increase the age limit to 20
- Create a minor league system (and youth system), and abolish the age limit

Leaving it as it is right now, is not a good idea IMO.

Cheers
 

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Debt Collector said:
things are alot different in europe. athletes over there make far, far less than athletes do over here, exception being soccer players, in which you dont see to many 15 year olds in the english premier league. if you had the same thing here in the US, you'd just have crazy parents trying to mold their kids into the next lebron at age 5. not really good for society.
Athletes make less money in europe because the economies are smaller, not because there are more young athletes. Look at thier tennis stars, they make just as much as the american players do. But thier internal economies dont make thier sports as big as the NBA or NFL are.

Considering hockey, baseball and tennis, golf already have very young kids playing in them as pros, I dont see how parents all of a sudden will start trying to mold thier kids into the next lebron
 

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doctor_darko said:
The great example of this is Darko Milicic. He didn't come ready to the NBA, and while extremely talented (and unlucky too, should I add), he never got a chance to improve. While on the other hand, you got Nenad Krstic, who waited until he was ready. Had Krstic come when he was 18, his fate would have mirrored Darko. In fact, Darko at 16 was a better player than Krstic at 18. But look at them now ...
There are plenty of guys who have come into the NBA as projects but evolved into solid players. Darko has failed because of his lack of work ethic, and its possible he would have been a bust in Europe as well, as he never played in the Euroleague.

Krstic is pretty much the opposite. Less natural talent but much better mindset. Thats what it comes down too. I'm tired of the Darko apologists. The kid gave up in frustration after not getting minutes, while Krstic when he wasn't in the rotation with the Nets spent days and days at the gym, sometimes forgetting what time it was.
 

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BBALLSCIENCES said:
It's official then. This age limit is a race issue. Shame.
Is this sarcasm? Because if not, thats a tremendous leap of logic.
 

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Foulzilla said:
Is this sarcasm? Because if not, thats a tremendous leap of logic.
I agree with him race plays a big issue, but there was little on this thread so far to lead in that direction
 

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Rollydog said:
There are plenty of guys who have come into the NBA as projects but evolved into solid players. Darko has failed because of his lack of work ethic, and its possible he would have been a bust in Europe as well, as he never played in the Euroleague.

Krstic is pretty much the opposite. Less natural talent but much better mindset. Thats what it comes down too. I'm tired of the Darko apologists. The kid gave up in frustration after not getting minutes, while Krstic when he wasn't in the rotation with the Nets spent days and days at the gym, sometimes forgetting what time it was.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/pistons/0504/08/pist-142926.htm

"Darko is a young kid that just doesn't get it," Brown said. "He wants to play, but he wants to play on his terms. He sees all these other kids from his draft class playing on bad teams and it's tough for him. ... Listen, if he'd have played last year and we lost, he'd been much happier. That's not a bad thing. That's just what we're faced with.
I agree with you in a certain extent Rollydog.

Now I think that he would have played more in any other NBA team . Coach Brown did not even play LB james in the Olympics ...And Milicic is just 20 years old , Krstic is 2 years older . Who can tell what player will be Darko in 2 years from now?
 
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