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Drew Packham said he will pay to see Shawn Bradley play because the Dallas Center is so awkward he's entertaining. Will you guy pay to see him. As for me, the answer is NO.

Shawn Bradley

Some might consider 48 minutes of Bradley to be more like 48 minutes of hell.

Not me.

Have you ever watched a movie you know isn't the greatest -- it might even be outright terrible -- but you still watch it over and over for whatever reason? Mine's Ishtar. Despite starring two legendary actors in Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty, Ishtar was thrashed by the media and widely considered one of cinema's biggest flops. But I can't get enough. Watching two stars struggle through their not-so-funny lines was so awkward it actually became funny.

A little like Shawn Bradley.

The Dallas "center" is so awkward he's entertaining. I have nothing against the guy personally. He's a family man. Very nice guy. But it's drop-dead funny to watch the guy run down the court, hit someone with one of his flailing elbows, or, if lucky, go up for a dunk.

Bradley's 11.1 minutes per game just aren't enough for me. Give me 48 minutes of Shawn Bradley, and I'm a Mavericks season ticket holder. OK, maybe not, but it beats Ishtar.
 

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Yao Ming was the first guy above 7'5 to come into the NBA and not carry around his height like some kind of a freak. I remember reading articles where Shawn Bradley would sometimes be embarrassed about how freakishly tall and skinny he was. Manute Bol and Muresan were nobodies in the NBA. Yao is pretty much your regular guy... just a little taller.

Back on topic... no way I would pay to see the guy. I wouldn't mind playing against him though.
 

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I don't think Manute Bol was a nobody. In 1986 he beat out Hakeem for a spot on the All-Defense 2nd Team (DPOY Mark Eaton was on the 1st Team, though a solid case could have been made for Bol). He had almost 400 blocks that season, and that was in playing just 26 mpg. In 1988-89 he had 345 blocks in only 22 mpg. And he wasn't as bad a rebounder as people often make out (I think, like they do now for Yao, people expected him to be a monster on the boards because he was so tall).
 

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bol was 7'6 but only weighed 200 pounds... some defensive player he must have been. All he did was block the ball. bradley can do this when he gets minutes.

if you are going to count bradley as a nobody, then bol counts as a nobody. he never averaged more than 6 rpg in a season, played on 5 different teams in his 9 year career and had a career average of 2.6 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 3.4 bpg.
 

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Hakeem said:
I don't think Manute Bol was a nobody. In 1986 he beat out Hakeem for a spot on the All-Defense 2nd Team (DPOY Mark Eaton was on the 1st Team, though a solid case could have been made for Bol). He had almost 400 blocks that season, and that was in playing just 26 mpg. In 1988-89 he had 345 blocks in only 22 mpg. And he wasn't as bad a rebounder as people often make out (I think, like they do now for Yao, people expected him to be a monster on the boards because he was so tall).
I suspect having Ralph Sampson hurt Hakeem's chances, as well as only playing 68 games. Bol really had no impressive attributes besides his ability to block shots. I guess averaging 5 bpg for one season and doing nothing else can get you a spot on an All-Defense 2nd Team. Hakeem on the other hand averaged 3. 4 bpg, 2 spg and 11.5 rpg.
 

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People like to say that blocked shots aren't a good indicator of defensive prowess, but when you have someone there who's liable to reject you at any half-opportunity, you don't play naturally. The thought that you'll be blocked if you're not very very careful sits in the back of your mind, and you end up being that extra bit cautious, hesitating before every shot. Having a great shot-blocker in the middle has a huge impact on a team's overall defense. Also, players who get a lot of blocks are players who also change a lot of shots. I've seen it with Yao plenty of times, especially this season. He may not block all that many shots, but over and over again players have gone up for a shot and have had to change it in mid-air, which most often results in a miss.

Bol was terrible offensively. However, he was undeniably a significant defensive presence. He had over 9 blocks per 48 mins (Olajuwon, the all-time leader in blocks, had less than 6 in his best season for that category, and only 4.5 in 1986, the year in which Bol beat him for a spot on the All-Defense 2nd Team), and had almost as many rebounds per 48 mins as Yao does now (which isn't great, but not too bad, either).

Bradley wasn't a nobody either. He was a decent player from about 1996 to 2001. He had Yao's defensive ability (actually, he was a better shot-blocker and rebounder than Yao, however, like Bol, he was slow) combined with Kelvin Cato's offence.
 

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I like watching Bradley on television. He's the only guy in the NBA that can check in and get four fouls in two minutes. Shawn Bradley=entertainment television.
 

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Hakeem said:
People like to say that blocked shots aren't a good indicator of defensive prowess, but when you have someone there who's liable to reject you at any half-opportunity, you don't play naturally. The thought that you'll be blocked if you're not very very careful sits in the back of your mind, and you end up being that extra bit cautious, hesitating before every shot. Having a great shot-blocker in the middle has a huge impact on a team's overall defense. Also, players who get a lot of blocks are players who also change a lot of shots. I've seen it with Yao plenty of times, especially this season. He may not block all that many shots, but over and over again players have gone up for a shot and have had to change it in mid-air, which most often results in a miss.
No one is denying the impact shot blockers, especially tall ones, have on the game. But Bol was too skinny to hold his ground in the post and only effective standing right under the basket.

Bol was terrible offensively. However, he was undeniably a significant defensive presence. He had over 9 blocks per 48 mins (Olajuwon, the all-time leader in blocks, had less than 6 in his best season for that category, and only 4.5 in 1986, the year in which Bol beat him for a spot on the All-Defense 2nd Team), and had almost as many rebounds per 48 mins as Yao does now (which isn't great, but not too bad, either).
Players who are as one-dimensional as Bol have trouble finding minutes, not to mention his body really affected his stamina. So comparing his 48 minute stats with Hakeem is a moot point, since Hakeem provided a defensive presence for 35-38 mpg and Bol was too weak of a defender and rebounder to stay on the floor for more than 25 mpg. It is, after all, a 48 minute game.
 

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Good points about his body affecting his stamina and he being too skinny to hold his ground in the post, but I have to disagree with that "Bol was too weak of a defender and rebounder to stay on the floor for more than 25 mpg" bit. He may have been physically weak, but he certainly wasn't a weak defender overall. In some games, if he got his timing going, he would completely shut down the basket area. I remember a game in 1992-93 when he blocked Shaq like six times in the first half because Shaq kept backing him down easily and then spinning around him for an attempted dunk, and Bol just kept reaching over with an impossibly long arm and slapping the ball away (mind you, in the second half Shaq was smart enough to draw him out a bit and then just run by him).
And as for his rebounding deficiencies limiting him to a maximum of 25 mpg, he was only marginally worse than Yao is now, so if Yao can get 31 minutes with Deke as backup, I don't see why that should have limited Bol.

You're right though in saying that Bol just didn't have the stamina to play many minutes. Even when he was on fire defensively, the coach would have to take him out because he got tired. And you're also correct in pointing out that one-dimensional players rarely get a lot of minutes. However, I just can't call a player who was the greatest shot-blocker since they started counting them and who made the then hotly contested All-Defense 2nd Team a "nobody".
 

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Hakeem said:
However, I just can't call a player who was the greatest shot-blocker since they started counting them and who made the then hotly contested All-Defense 2nd Team a "nobody".
You're right... I guess what I meant to say was compared to Yao the other 7'6 guys are nobodies. Bol only had 1 or 2 good seasons, that too on weak teams.
 
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