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Rollin Wit Da Homies
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I've been off the boards for a long time, sick with a stomach virus. But truebluefan asked if anyone wanted to write editorial posts, so here it is... most of it is info that you all know, but just for the sake of writing, I'll put it up.

Take all of your current emotions about the Bulls and push them aside. All of the talk of Chandler making the All-Star team, Curry beating up on Shaq, Williams leading the team to the playoffs next year... push them all aside. Let's be as objective as possible.

Let's examine the Bulls through a brief walk back in time . . .

STEP 1: Laying the foundation

First, Krause pulled an incredibly questionable trade: Elton Brand for Tyson Chandler. Then he drafted the local high school superstar, Eddy Curry. These young kids worked hard, and although we are biased as Bulls fans, the word around the league is that they are the most promising high schoolers in their draft class.

These past seasons have been the most painful to watch, because there were no players to root for. The mix of veterans that have filled in the roster for the past few years have been disappointing, from Brent Barry to Hersey Hawkins, but slowly, every last one of them has been weeded out of the system, leaving only a purely talented, incredibly athletic, inexperienced bucnh of kids. Goodbye Matt Maloney, Bryce Drew, and John Starks. It was good knowing you, Toni Kukoc. Thanks for the memories, Ron Mercer.

Hello, Tyson, and good morning, Eddy. I hope you guys enjoy spending the end of your teenage years in front of all the cameras and living large. Jamal Crawford, how's it going? Nineteen games, you say? Isn't that interesting!

STEP 2: Callling the experts for help

There are two parts of this. First, Bill Cartwright. Tim Floyd's retirement was a blessing, and while no one really hates Floyd for what he did, people were certainly wondering what he wasn't doing.

Jalen Rose. Rose couldn't have been the more perfect person to pick for this triangle-oriented offense. The versatile small forward thrived in the triple post, and did exactly what the coaching staff wanted him to do: start feeding the ball inside to the big boys and see what they could do. Welcome to Chicago, Jalen... we've been waiting for someone like you.

STEP 3: Assembling the team
Thirdly, surround them with other young talents, but talents that have upward potential as well as on court experience. Krause is extremely intelligent in getting Jay Williams, Roger Mason Jr., Lonny Baxter, Trenton Hassell. College players (besides Hassell, all from the ACC, which arguably offers the best competition in the NCAA), competitive, skilled, and experienced. All of these players are 21 - 23 years of age (useless fact: Roger Mason Jr. and Jay Williams share the same birthday, seperated by exactly one year).

We're talking about some serious talent coming through here, as well as good court experience. Add a few veteran FA's, like Popeye Jones and/or Scott Williams, and we have quite an interesting team.

(Did I forget to mention Marcus Fizer? Sorry. He's definitely a strong talent, but unfortunately, not part of the main focus of the team. The fact that Krause and Cartwright forget to mention him in radio broadcasts does not imply anything concerning his trade availability, but it does speak about his significance on the team. Did Krause take Fizer just to screw the Clippers over in that 2000 draft? I guess he made up for it by giving them Brand, later. In the meantime, Fizer is an extremely talented draft mistake who gives us strong minutes off the bench until we lose him in a trade or later on, in free agency.)

But make no mistake. The Twin Toddlers continue to be the main focus of the team. A lot of the talk about Crawford, Williams, and Hassell, and Robinson is actually less relevant to the fate of the team than one might think. Chandler and Curry's development is the most important thing, because as many will tell you, the NBA belongs to the big men.

It's difficult to tell what Krause is thinking, but here is the general direction I am trying to synthesize from these trends in the roster...

Players: The roster is fairly set, sans our FA's this summer. The backcourt dilemma is easily solvable by letting the candidates for the starting and bench positions compete in the summer camps, and pushing anyone else that might seem useful to the IR. Baxter is probably here to stay, because of the lack of big man depth beyond Fizer and Bagaric (depending, again, on the FA's). Best will not be re-signed, and neither will Guyton or Oakley.

The starters are capable, and the bench has three or more players that could get spot starts for the Bulls.

Starters:
Jay Williams
Jamal Crawford
Jalen Rose
Tyson Chandler
Eddy Curry


Alternate starters:
Marcus Fizer
Eddie Robinson
Trenton Hassell
Free Agents (Scott Williams, Popeye Jones)

Rest of bench:
Lonny Baxter
Roger Mason Jr.
Dalibor Bagaric
Fred Hoiberg

Strategy: Bill Cartwright will obligingly stick to the triangle offense, using Rose, Williams, or Crawford as the initiators and Curry as the focal point. The Bulls may never gain an identity as a great jump shooting basketball team, but with Chandler and Curry's rapid development, soon we will be seeing a lot of double-teams and resulting open jumpers that must be made. Any backcourt player on the Bulls maintains his non-IR status by his ability to make a jump shot. The other part of team strategy comes defensively. The Bulls will not often employ a conscientious zone defense, but with Chandler and Curry patrolling the paint, perimeter defenders will have the ability to take more chances. Steals and blocks result in fast break opportunities, and a fast break offers the greatest advantage for these young and athletic players to score easy points.

Chemistry: This is where the Bulls will shine. I harp on chemistry non-stop, but the fact is, the Bulls are always a team with direction and the team moves together. Even when the team moved in the downward spiral bravely through the Ron Mercer era, Bulls fans knew they were throwing seasons away with an objective in the offseason, whether in the lottery or through free agency. The team was headed decidedly downward in the hope of heading decidedly upward.

Now, everyone agrees that the team is headed decidedly upward, and the chemistry of the team will reveal that these are not random talents put together in the hope of forming a strong unit, but rather a complete balance of firm players that trust and rely on each other.

Conclusion: We are looking good. I now officially turn away from my soapbox saying that we should have drafted Shane Battier instead of trading Brand and drafting Curry. The skill and talent would have been within a level of maturity, but we wouldn't have been growing any superstars. Now, we may have too many superstars to keep...

We are looking very good.
 

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Great summary. I think we've covered the basis.
Now the team has to stay together for quite a while and gel.
No more big trades PLEASE!!!
 

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Showtyme, Great article! I'd say that the likelyhood of a sign&trade involving Best is rather high considering recent reports in the Trib and Sun Times. Trading partners that have been mentioned are Orlando (to get Mike Miller) and Philly (to get Matt Harpring. I'd like to see us ship Best to Philly, and then trade Fizer for Mike Miller. We could then use the tax exemptions to sign a good veteran back-up PF/C. That would fill our team out nicely.

And I tip my hat to JWill for turning down JayLeno and the ESPY awards in order to work his way into the starting line-up at pre-summer league practices starting today. It's good to see that his priorities are alined with future success, rather than the glory of his past achievements.
 

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Excellent article, Showtyme! I almost ignored it, because with the title "Editorial Post" and the "Sticky," I thought it was another thread about the use of copyrighted material or moderator editing.

I like Hassell at the starting SG spot a little more than Crawford. For a fifth starter on a championship-level team, I like the defense-first guy who can hit an open shot and occasionally create for himself over a pure shooter like Crawford. Not that these are perfect comparisons, but I guess I prefer a Harper-like player to a Paxson/BJ Armstrong-like player.

What role do you see for Fizer and Robinson once the Bulls become good? Neither is a great defender and at least right now Fizer is a very low percentage shooter for a PF. Robinson does not have much range, so he does not keep the floor spread. It doesn't seem like players like Robinson and Fizer end up playing much for championship-level teams. Shooters like Crawford and defenders like Hassell and even big back-up centers like Bagaric do find minutes on championship-level teams.
 

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Originally posted by Showtyme
I've been off the boards for a long time, sick with a stomach virus. But truebluefan asked if anyone wanted to write editorial posts, so here it is... most of it is info that you all know, but just for the sake of writing, I'll put it up.

Take all of your current emotions about the Bulls and push them aside. All of the talk of Chandler making the All-Star team, Curry beating up on Shaq, Williams leading the team to the playoffs next year... push them all aside. Let's be as objective as possible.

Let's examine the Bulls through a brief walk back in time . . .

STEP 1: Laying the foundation

First, Krause pulled an incredibly questionable trade: Elton Brand for Tyson Chandler. Then he drafted the local high school superstar, Eddy Curry. These young kids worked hard, and although we are biased as Bulls fans, the word around the league is that they are the most promising high schoolers in their draft class.

These past seasons have been the most painful to watch, because there were no players to root for. The mix of veterans that have filled in the roster for the past few years have been disappointing, from Brent Barry to Hersey Hawkins, but slowly, every last one of them has been weeded out of the system, leaving only a purely talented, incredibly athletic, inexperienced bucnh of kids. Goodbye Matt Maloney, Bryce Drew, and John Starks. It was good knowing you, Toni Kukoc. Thanks for the memories, Ron Mercer.

Hello, Tyson, and good morning, Eddy. I hope you guys enjoy spending the end of your teenage years in front of all the cameras and living large. Jamal Crawford, how's it going? Nineteen games, you say? Isn't that interesting!

STEP 2: Callling the experts for help

There are two parts of this. First, Bill Cartwright. Tim Floyd's retirement was a blessing, and while no one really hates Floyd for what he did, people were certainly wondering what he wasn't doing.

Jalen Rose. Rose couldn't have been the more perfect person to pick for this triangle-oriented offense. The versatile small forward thrived in the triple post, and did exactly what the coaching staff wanted him to do: start feeding the ball inside to the big boys and see what they could do. Welcome to Chicago, Jalen... we've been waiting for someone like you.

STEP 3: Assembling the team
Thirdly, surround them with other young talents, but talents that have upward potential as well as on court experience. Krause is extremely intelligent in getting Jay Williams, Roger Mason Jr., Lonny Baxter, Trenton Hassell. College players (besides Hassell, all from the ACC, which arguably offers the best competition in the NCAA), competitive, skilled, and experienced. All of these players are 21 - 23 years of age (useless fact: Roger Mason Jr. and Jay Williams share the same birthday, seperated by exactly one year).

We're talking about some serious talent coming through here, as well as good court experience. Add a few veteran FA's, like Popeye Jones and/or Scott Williams, and we have quite an interesting team.

(Did I forget to mention Marcus Fizer? Sorry. He's definitely a strong talent, but unfortunately, not part of the main focus of the team. The fact that Krause and Cartwright forget to mention him in radio broadcasts does not imply anything concerning his trade availability, but it does speak about his significance on the team. Did Krause take Fizer just to screw the Clippers over in that 2000 draft? I guess he made up for it by giving them Brand, later. In the meantime, Fizer is an extremely talented draft mistake who gives us strong minutes off the bench until we lose him in a trade or later on, in free agency.)

But make no mistake. The Twin Toddlers continue to be the main focus of the team. A lot of the talk about Crawford, Williams, and Hassell, and Robinson is actually less relevant to the fate of the team than one might think. Chandler and Curry's development is the most important thing, because as many will tell you, the NBA belongs to the big men.

It's difficult to tell what Krause is thinking, but here is the general direction I am trying to synthesize from these trends in the roster...

Players: The roster is fairly set, sans our FA's this summer. The backcourt dilemma is easily solvable by letting the candidates for the starting and bench positions compete in the summer camps, and pushing anyone else that might seem useful to the IR. Baxter is probably here to stay, because of the lack of big man depth beyond Fizer and Bagaric (depending, again, on the FA's). Best will not be re-signed, and neither will Guyton or Oakley.

The starters are capable, and the bench has three or more players that could get spot starts for the Bulls.

Starters:
Jay Williams
Jamal Crawford
Jalen Rose
Tyson Chandler
Eddy Curry


Alternate starters:
Marcus Fizer
Eddie Robinson
Trenton Hassell
Free Agents (Scott Williams, Popeye Jones)

Rest of bench:
Lonny Baxter
Roger Mason Jr.
Dalibor Bagaric
Fred Hoiberg

Strategy: Bill Cartwright will obligingly stick to the triangle offense, using Rose, Williams, or Crawford as the initiators and Curry as the focal point. The Bulls may never gain an identity as a great jump shooting basketball team, but with Chandler and Curry's rapid development, soon we will be seeing a lot of double-teams and resulting open jumpers that must be made. Any backcourt player on the Bulls maintains his non-IR status by his ability to make a jump shot. The other part of team strategy comes defensively. The Bulls will not often employ a conscientious zone defense, but with Chandler and Curry patrolling the paint, perimeter defenders will have the ability to take more chances. Steals and blocks result in fast break opportunities, and a fast break offers the greatest advantage for these young and athletic players to score easy points.

Chemistry: This is where the Bulls will shine. I harp on chemistry non-stop, but the fact is, the Bulls are always a team with direction and the team moves together. Even when the team moved in the downward spiral bravely through the Ron Mercer era, Bulls fans knew they were throwing seasons away with an objective in the offseason, whether in the lottery or through free agency. The team was headed decidedly downward in the hope of heading decidedly upward.

Now, everyone agrees that the team is headed decidedly upward, and the chemistry of the team will reveal that these are not random talents put together in the hope of forming a strong unit, but rather a complete balance of firm players that trust and rely on each other.

Conclusion: We are looking good. I now officially turn away from my soapbox saying that we should have drafted Shane Battier instead of trading Brand and drafting Curry. The skill and talent would have been within a level of maturity, but we wouldn't have been growing any superstars. Now, we may have too many superstars to keep...

We are looking very good.
when you make a imply that JK took Fizer to screw the Clipps sort of makes it hard to believe anythingk else you have to say. Because noone in ihis or her right mind would think that JK as Gm would be that stupid.
 

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Rollin Wit Da Homies
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It's not that stupid to believe that JK took Fizer to hurt the Clips.

He wanted Miles. He couldn't get him.

Fizer was the best available talent.

Making the Clips keep Miles instead of getting the PF to replace Maurice is what some on the board have called "offensive" GMing.

I think it's better to believe that JK was trying to foil a deal that would have made LA a stronger team immediately (as well as Orlando, who is a more direct competitor) than to believe that JK is a poor enough scout to believe that Fizer could step in and fill a SF spot. It makes Krause sound stupider to believe that he would draft a solid PF out of college and convert him into a jump shooting SF with size when a sweet shooting SF with size was already available (Mike Miller, the pick that the Bulls were "supposed" to take for the Clips deal to go through).

Krause isn't dumb. I never said he was, and I don't think he is. But even if I did, it wouldn't disqualify the validity of my post...
 
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