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Aren't many of us terribly fickle, really? (....of course, discounting Ed O. in this over-generalization ;))

When the Blazers do poorly one game, we jump all over them and managment as if they're all a bunch of losers and yahoo........and ought to be sent packing. :curse:

Then, they win a game, or play well (such as in the Detroit game), and all-of-a-sudden they're playoff material, os such. :clap: :banana:

Strap in, folks. This is gonna be one of those roller-coaster types of seasons that we haven't seen in these parts for quite a few years.

Gonna be fun, though. :yes:
 

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I think a majority of fans of every sport/team are fickle. I think it is relatively hard to be objective in sports concerning your favorite team, as everyone wants to win every game.
 

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I tend to agree with you. Its like watching a horde of Lemmings, with the Blazers being the lead lemming. If they go off a cliff, so do the rest. If they go someplace nice, so do the rest.

Your all just a bunch of Blazer Lemmings! :clown:
 

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ABM said:
Aren't many of us terribly fickle, really? (....of course, discounting Ed O. in this over-generalization ;))

When the Blazers do poorly one game, we jump all over them and managment as if they're all a bunch of losers and yahoo........and ought to be sent packing. :curse:

Then, they win a game, or play well (such as in the Detroit game), and all-of-a-sudden they're playoff material, os such. :clap: :banana:

Strap in, folks. This is gonna be one of those roller-coaster types of seasons that we haven't seen in these parts for quite a few years.

Gonna be fun, though. :yes:

I always said I would rather watch young guys that want to play lose a game than watch what was going on with our "Veteran" team. I enjoy these guys........haven't reallly enjoyed watching since the Pippen days. I am not fickle.............but I am a number of other people. :clown:
 

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ABM said:
Aren't many of us terribly fickle, really? (....of course, discounting Ed O. in this over-generalization ;))

When the Blazers do poorly one game, we jump all over them and managment as if they're all a bunch of losers and yahoo........and ought to be sent packing. :curse:

Then, they win a game, or play well (such as in the Detroit game), and all-of-a-sudden they're playoff material, os such. :clap: :banana:

Strap in, folks. This is gonna be one of those roller-coaster types of seasons that we haven't seen in these parts for quite a few years.

Gonna be fun, though. :yes:

you're just now getting this?

We had a small movement to annoint Travis the starter because we already had thrown darius to the wolves. Now Darius is (somewhat) back in our favor, and Travis is being thrown to the wolves.

Every year we have scapegoats that are "made" by seeds planted. Sergei has one game, and all the sudden he's no longer a throw in on a trade (where he's basically throw away).

Somethings are constant tho. Juan Dixon, Derek Anderson, Damon Stoudamire...as a whole (which means, for the people who won't agree, not everyone) we ***** about them regardless.

we're far too fickle sometimes, and too much of the "what have you done for me lately" mentality (ironically, there's also a "look what you have done for me in the past" mentality). Patience is a virtue most hard-core sports fans (and also bandwagon fans) don't have enough of. If you're not showing what you can do now (or at the degree "I" deem correct) you're a waste.

Fie on fickle, fie!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Hap said:
you're just now getting this?
No, just decided to post on it. :)

Which, of course, brings to mind.........



Oh, and speaking of the Flying Fickle Finger Of Fate Award....

At the 1994 annual awards dinner given for Forensic Science, AAFS President Dr. Don Harper Mills astounded his audience with the legal complications of a bizarre death. Here is the story:

On March 23, 1994, the medical examiner viewed the body of Ronald Opus and concluded that he died from a shotgun wound to the head. Mr. Opus had jumped from the top of a ten-story building intending to commit suicide. He left a note to the effect indicating his despondency. As he fell past the ninth floor his life was interrupted by a shotgun blast passing through a window, which killed him instantly. Neither the shooter nor the deceased was aware that a safety net had been installed just below the eighth floor level to protect some building workers and that Ronald Opus would not have been able to complete his suicide the way he had planned. "Ordinarily," Dr. Mills continued, "A person who sets out to commit suicide and ultimately succeeds, even though the mechanism might not be what he intended, is still defined as committing suicide." That Mr. Opus was shot on the way to certain death, but probably would not have been successful because of the safety net, caused the medical examiner to feel that he had a homicide on his hands. In the room on the ninth floor, where the shotgun blast emanated, was occupied by an elderly man and his wife. They were arguing vigorously and he was threatening her with a shotgun. The man was so upset that when he pulled the trigger he completely missed his wife and the pellets went through the window striking Mr. Opus. When one intends to kill subject "A" but kills subject "B" in the attempt, one is guilty of the murder of subject "B."

When confronted with the murder charge the old man and his wife were both adamant and both said that they thought the shotgun was unloaded. The old man said it was a long-standing habit to threaten his wife with the unloaded shotgun. He had no intention to murder her. Therefore the killing of Mr. Opus appeared to be an accident; that is, if the gun had been accidentally loaded.

The continuing investigation turned up a witness who saw the old couple's son loading the shotgun about six weeks prior to the fatal accident. It transpired that the old lady had cut off her son's financial support and the son, knowing the propensity of his father to use the shotgun threateningly, loaded the gun with the expectation that his father would shoot his mother. Since the loader of the gun was aware of this, he was guilty of the murder even though he didn't actually pull the trigger. The case now becomes one of murder on the part of the son for the death of Ronald Opus.

Now comes the exquisite twist. Further investigation revealed that the son was, in fact, Ronald Opus. He had become increasingly despondent over the failure of his attempt to engineer his mother's murder. This led him to jump off the ten story building on March 23rd, only to be killed by a shotgun blast passing through the ninth story window. The son had actually murdered himself so the medical examiner closed the case as a suicide.

(A true story from Associated Press, Reported by Kurt Westervelt)
 

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I don't think I could call myself fickle. Maybe in the past years, but this year I am pretty set on my feelings for each player. I wanted Darius to step it up and he did. I lke Ruben's game, but have always cringed at some of his bonehead mistakes. I still want Outlaw to start, obviously that is tought, but I want him to play regardless. Smith hasn't shown me much and I haven't formed a biased opinion about. Jack has impressed me as a rookie.

Dixon on the other hand, I had hopes about, but had really never seen him play. Right now I have really strong feelings about him even touching the ball. I don't understand what he does to get the forth quarter minutes and a deciding shot in a close game against Detroit. There are quality minds on the bench behind him, even if they are out of position, and I think he should be on the inactive list. If he starts draining three's I might change my mind, but that doesn't seem likely.
 

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Redbeard said:
I don't think I could call myself fickle. Maybe in the past years, but this year I am pretty set on my feelings for each player. I wanted Darius to step it up and he did. I lke Ruben's game, but have always cringed at some of his bonehead mistakes. I still want Outlaw to start, obviously that is tought, but I want him to play regardless. Smith hasn't shown me much and I haven't formed a biased opinion about. Jack has impressed me as a rookie.

Dixon on the other hand, I had hopes about, but had really never seen him play. Right now I have really strong feelings about him even touching the ball. I don't understand what he does to get the forth quarter minutes and a deciding shot in a close game against Detroit. There are quality minds on the bench behind him, even if they are out of position, and I think he should be on the inactive list. If he starts draining three's I might change my mind, but that doesn't seem likely.
I am not trying to argue with you, but if your sig is referencing the 76-77 playoffs, it is inacurate. Against Denver, the Blazers won games 1, 3, 4, and 6. Of course they swept the Lakers for a five game winning streak. They lost games 1 and 2 against the sixers, winning 3, 4, 5, and six for a four game win streak. The sig is cool though.
 

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i'm not fickle, I just want to see the team makes good moves and win. and so far, the moves that nash has made makes me scratch my head and wonder what he is thinking. the signings he made(darius,zbo and theo) to go along with sar,damon,da point to him trying to field a team and win. then all of a sudden 4 months later, it's time for a youth movement. why not start the youth movement before by just signing zach and miles and letting theo go? I mean no matter what, we will lose, so what does having theo do for our chances? now all we are is stuck with a aging injury plagued center with 20 million dollars due to him for no more then 4 ppg, 4 boards and maybe 2 blocks. this doesn't make me fickle, it shows i know what i'm talking about and I should expect the same from our general manager who is paid to know things like this. I feel in order for you to make 20 million dollars, you need to earn it. theo has not earned a paycheck from us since his 1st season here after being traded from atlanta.
 

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tradetheo said:
i'm not fickle, I just want to see the team makes good moves and win. and so far, the moves that nash has made makes me scratch my head and wonder what he is thinking. the signings he made(darius,zbo and theo) to go along with sar,damon,da point to him trying to field a team and win. then all of a sudden 4 months later, it's time for a youth movement. why not start the youth movement before by just signing zach and miles and letting theo go? I mean no matter what, we will lose, so what does having theo do for our chances? now all we are is stuck with a aging injury plagued center with 20 million dollars due to him for no more then 4 ppg, 4 boards and maybe 2 blocks. this doesn't make me fickle, it shows i know what i'm talking about and I should expect the same from our general manager who is paid to know things like this. I feel in order for you to make 20 million dollars, you need to earn it. theo has not earned a paycheck from us since his 1st season here after being traded from atlanta.

i would bet that they didn't want to go with the youth movement because they didn't expect zach to be out for as long as he was, nor shareef. Nor DA.

and expected to make some trades (almost had one to get us carter, but we all know how that ended).
 

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I don't consider myself fickle. I just wanted to see a good effort and close games. So far things are going as I expected/hoped. Darius has stepped up, which I told you guys would happen once his role with the team was solidified, unlike what happened to him last year. Zach has exceeded my expectations so far. I thought he was going to look bad from the start while he was still recovering from surgery. Dixon has been what I expected. A Wizards fan popped in here when we got him and told us what to expect -- one good game for every 3 or 4 crappers. I've never believed that Telfair was going to live up to the hype but so far he's been ok. Nothing spectacular, but not horrible either. I'm a bit disapointed in Pryz, but as others have pointed out he's not used the same way he was last year - running those pick and roles with Damon and Nick. I was hoping Webster was going to be NBA ready but it appears he has a long way to go to earn the starting spot. The rest of the team is doing ok. The only real disapointment I have is in Travis Outlaw. I was expecting a breakout year and so far he can't even stay on the active roster.

I felt like Edo at the end of last season, but there's reason to hope now. My expectations are to be back in the playoffs next season. If that doesn't happen I'm sure things will get real fickle.
 

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Kiss_My_Darius said:
Some call it fickleness, others call it being open to the idea they may be wrong. Personally. I call it chick hormones. :smile:
um, since what he's talking about is people jumping offand on bandwagons at the drop of the hat, I'm not sure what being "open to the idea that they may be wrong" has to do with it.
 

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Hap said:
um, since what he's talking about is people jumping offand on bandwagons at the drop of the hat, I'm not sure what being "open to the idea that they may be wrong" has to do with it.

Give me a break will you. I'm having fun giving a different interpretation (admittedly somewhat dumb interpretation). "Fickle posters" think the team sucks and dis them on the board, then they see them play and think they are good, then they talk it up that they are great, then Blazers get blown out and they think they suck again and dis them . . . .

It probably is being fickle. But us fans who do it like to stay in denial and say we are just being open minded to the fact our opinion could be wrong and willing to change it . . . and change it again. . . and change it again. I'm guessing this is not a problem for you. :smile:
 

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Since we are on the topic of "bandwagon," here is a quote from an old friend of ours:

"Rasheed Wallace was watching one of the talking heads on ESPN rave about the virtues of the Pistons, the NBA's only unbeaten team, and he shook his head. "I told you them bandwagon-(expletive) cats were going to jump on board," he said. Indeed, the Pistons are again making believers of the skeptics

I miss that "cat" smack.
 

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It will be interesting to me, over the course of the season, to see the "fickleness" of predictions players in the overall trend of their confidence in the Blazers ability to win games.

I have a game-by-game indicator, a moving four-game average and a moving eight-game average. By having moving averages, it smooths the individual game bumps and better indicates an overall trend.

It will be interesting to watch the trend as the season progresses.

Gramps...
 

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I think it's not so much fickleness as that sports fans are all closet manic-depressives. When the team does well, we are sky high and ready to crown them champions. One bad game and we are in the depths of the dungeons and the team and everyone associated with it sucks. I've seen this with fans of numerous teams in numerous sports so it's not a Blazers thing.
Frankly, isn't that part of the fun of being a sports fan, the agony and the ecstasy?
 

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At the 1994 annual awards dinner given for Forensic Science, AAFS President Dr. Don Harper Mills astounded his audience with the legal complications of a bizarre death. Here is the story:

On March 23, 1994, the medical examiner viewed the body of Ronald Opus and concluded that he died from a shotgun wound to the head. Mr. Opus had jumped from the top of a ten-story building intending to commit suicide. He left a note to the effect indicating his despondency. As he fell past the ninth floor his life was interrupted by a shotgun blast passing through a window, which killed him instantly. Neither the shooter nor the deceased was aware that a safety net had been installed just below the eighth floor level to protect some building workers and that Ronald Opus would not have been able to complete his suicide the way he had planned. "Ordinarily," Dr. Mills continued, "A person who sets out to commit suicide and ultimately succeeds, even though the mechanism might not be what he intended, is still defined as committing suicide." That Mr. Opus was shot on the way to certain death, but probably would not have been successful because of the safety net, caused the medical examiner to feel that he had a homicide on his hands. In the room on the ninth floor, where the shotgun blast emanated, was occupied by an elderly man and his wife. They were arguing vigorously and he was threatening her with a shotgun. The man was so upset that when he pulled the trigger he completely missed his wife and the pellets went through the window striking Mr. Opus. When one intends to kill subject "A" but kills subject "B" in the attempt, one is guilty of the murder of subject "B."

When confronted with the murder charge the old man and his wife were both adamant and both said that they thought the shotgun was unloaded. The old man said it was a long-standing habit to threaten his wife with the unloaded shotgun. He had no intention to murder her. Therefore the killing of Mr. Opus appeared to be an accident; that is, if the gun had been accidentally loaded.

The continuing investigation turned up a witness who saw the old couple's son loading the shotgun about six weeks prior to the fatal accident. It transpired that the old lady had cut off her son's financial support and the son, knowing the propensity of his father to use the shotgun threateningly, loaded the gun with the expectation that his father would shoot his mother. Since the loader of the gun was aware of this, he was guilty of the murder even though he didn't actually pull the trigger. The case now becomes one of murder on the part of the son for the death of Ronald Opus.

Now comes the exquisite twist. Further investigation revealed that the son was, in fact, Ronald Opus. He had become increasingly despondent over the failure of his attempt to engineer his mother's murder. This led him to jump off the ten story building on March 23rd, only to be killed by a shotgun blast passing through the ninth story window. The son had actually murdered himself so the medical examiner closed the case as a suicide.

(A true story from Associated Press, Reported by Kurt Westervelt)
Bizarre story, and very hard to believe. This entire scenario is played out in the opening scene of the movie Magnolia.
 
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