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UHA was only paying Gallagher a base of $218K? Yikes. At the end of the day this is a blessing for him.
 

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UHA was only paying Gallagher a base of $218K? Yikes. At the end of the day this is a blessing for him.
I assume this was 4 years ago so I’m sure it went up a tad, but I think that’s probably fair pay based on historical track record of the program. Uvm’s coach is at around 275k, right? Saw that in an article somewhere, which makes sense based on performance and state school type things.
 

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lsbal- here is Jeff Jacob's article:

It isn’t about Division I soccer. It is about credibility.

It isn’t about a high school hall of fame. It’s about trust.

And after yet another debacle, it isn’t about questions many still have. It’s whether anyone can believe University of Hartford President Greg Woodward’s answers.

Surely Woodward, who has billed himself as something of a renaissance man in his biography, is well-rounded enough to understand this.
After he admitted he plagiarized part of a speech in his recent commencement address, Bob Caslen resigned as president of the University of South Carolina.
“I understand the responsibilities and higher standards of senior level leadership,” Caslen wrote in a letter to the students. “When those are not met, trust is lost. And when trust is lost, one is unable to lead.”

This was the point I tried to hammer last month after Woodward’s email fiasco. Warren Goldstein, chair of the history and philosophy departments, was teaching a class via Zoom on one screen and emailing with Woodward on the other. Goldstein shared the wrong screen. Some in the class took a screenshot in which Woodward essentially urged Goldstein to lead a propaganda campaign and “let me and the spin doctors do the numbers.”
Woodward had insisted no decision on dropping UHart athletics from Division I to Division III had been made, yet his intent suddenly was clear. There was breach of trust and the dissolution of all goodwill.
Yet in a statement to NBC Connecticut, the university said the emails were an “informal exchange” that included a “joking statement,” and, oh yeah, Woodward regretted his choice of words.
A joke?

Even if sober minds believed that may eventually be the correct course, why wouldn’t the regents delay a decision? The Hawks advanced to the NCAA Division I Tournament for the first time and the school’s brand got more bang than ever before. With a much different conclusion in a report commissioned by “Friends of the Neighborhood” by noted economist Andy Schwartz, why not take time to re-examine everything? Given that Woodward had so damaged his credibility in the email fiasco, why not say “Whoa!”
Why? Woodward was playing with a stacked deck of regents he had nominated.
Did he really think that hundreds of athletes, former athletes and “Friends of the Neighborhood” wouldn’t do everything they could to try to overturn the decision? If he did underestimate their passion, he was reminded when he was booed so badly at commencement that he didn’t return for closing remarks.
Yet it is that need, that streak of narcissism, to paint himself as a renaissance man that led him to a focal point in his bio: “A composer, musician, scholar and one-time Division I soccer player …”

The words were repeated in publications, including one as early as 2013 by the Racine Journal-Times upon Woodward’s inauguration as president of Carthage (Wis.) College.
Until it was erased Friday, a UConn Foundation piece on Woodward went a step further: “He went to Villanova University on a soccer scholarship.”

There was no scholarship.

I reached out to Meagan Fazio at UHart about the Division I question on May 14 and repeated several emails to Fazio, Molly Polk and even Woodward. Finally, on May 18, Polk, in an email, asked my deadline. I responded that I would appreciate an answer by Friday. Well, early Friday, Woodward had decided to include his mea culpa in a letter to the university community. After congratulating graduates, explaining why he left the graduation and praising the regents for their DIII decision, he said he has committed to more transparency. In that spirit ...
“I need to acknowledge an inaccuracy in my biography that has been brought to my attention; specifically, that I was a Division I student-athlete. Nearly 50 years ago, I walked onto the varsity Villanova University soccer team as a first-year student and played for one year before transferring. The University’s athletics program was of the highest caliber at the time and that has always been how I recalled my experience.
“However, I now know the NCAA formally created the current three divisions in 1973, with men’s soccer added in 1982, after my experience. Therefore, the team was not recognized as Division I when I played. I apologize for this inaccuracy, and it has been corrected.”
Later, the quoted part was emailed to me by the school. The spin doctors obviously figured Woodward could pre-empt any reports by me or others. One problem, other matters had popped up.
Such as: In March, Woodward was on with Colin McEnroe of NPR during his quirky annual NCAA bracket breakdown. McEnroe pointed out Woodward had played Division I soccer.
“I went in as a freshman and played at Villanova and then didn’t finish my academic career there — I transferred (getting his bachelor’s degree from UConn in 1977),” Woodward said. “I’m in my high school hall of fame.”

Really?

“There is no Hall athletic hall of fame and we have no records of there ever being one,” West Hartford superintendent Tom Moore said.
Maybe Woodward was talking about a general Hall High hall of fame? Not one of those either, Moore said.
We found Hall’s 1972 yearbook. Woodward’s senior year.
He was not one of the three Hall players named All-CCIL first team. He was not one of the two named all-league second team, nor the one named all-league honorable mention. He was among four other seniors and five underclassmen noted for some outstanding play.
Maybe not hall of fame-worthy.
We also found a complete catalog of Villanova student newspapers online. In the Oct. 4, 1972 edition of The Villanovan, three games into the season, the full roster of the school’s soccer team was listed. There were 22 players, freshmen through seniors, from four countries and six states. None were named Greg Woodward.
Hey, his name could have been inadvertently left out or there is some other explanation, but he did say Friday he walked on and played for a year. I had thought maybe he held off going to college for a year, but Friday he pointed out that he played before the NCAA designated Division I in 1973.
At any rate, 12 players were named in The Villanovan’s 1973 preseason preview and Woodward wasn’t mentioned. He was not mentioned in any story about the soccer team in 1972 or 1973.
We twice contacted Villanova sports information and was told the school has scant records before starting its Division I program in 1982 and didn’t have rosters from 1972 or 1973. According to the student newspaper, there was club soccer until around 1970 when a varsity team was formed. A Brazilian player reportedly was given the only scholarship during that time.
While trying to make a nuanced delineation between what was called the “university division” pre-1973 and “Division I” starting in 1973, Woodward avoided a question of how often did he get on the field? Or, good grief, explaining not being anywhere on the published roster?
This isn’t little stuff anymore. Jay Bilas is tweeting about it. Dick Vitale is tweeting about it.
On my second question about absolving Morgan Valley of the buyout portion of her contract when she left as head coach to become assistant at UConn, the school said it does not comment on personnel matters. Valley, who had three years remaining on her deal, confirmed she asked and the school waived the buyout.
“We are,” the school said, “completely supportive of Coach Valley and wish her all the best in her dream position at her alma mater.”
When Jen Rizzotti was leading UHart to NCAA Tournament appearances, no way was she leaving as head coach to become an assistant at UConn. I don’t want to speak for Valley, but head coach at UConn would likely be her dream position. Given Woodward’s plan, immediately replacing Valley on an “interim” basis with an assistant coach who had been a DIII coach for 16 years before UHart does fit his modus operandi. As does having an interim athletic director for nearly two years.
The fact that Mark Boxer, who became UHart’s executive vice president and chief operating officer last year, also has been on the UConn Board of Trustees does raise some questions about potential conflict of interest. After all, UConn could have covered the buyout in a heartbeat.
The school has used the Carr report to demonstrate it was losing $13 million a year on athletics. Granted, Valley’s buyout, which sources indicated was close to $100,000, isn’t earth-shattering in major college sports. Yet for a school hemorrhaging money, you’d think every accountable dollar matters.
Hey, maybe another letter to the university community could be coming soon.

It should be Greg Woodward’s resignation. As a senior leader held to higher standards, he has lost trust and no longer can lead effectively.

[email protected]; @jeffjacobs123
 

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I guess the real question is what pressure? Not to say I’ve given up at all - I haven’t. But thinking logically and removing any emotion, who actually cares outside of like 1,000 people?
The pressure is coming from the media (both national and local) that have covered this story in a universally negative way. His dishonesty is now on display for literally millions of people to read about. How many care? I don't know. But 6000 people signed the petition to keep the Hawks at the D1 level and thousands more signed the petition to remove Woodward. Having your lack of leadership qualities publicized in this way is pretty hard for a typical university president to withstand. At a public university he would already be gone. We all know he has stacked the board with his people but how long can they act like nothing is wrong and this is all business as usual? Leaked emails to The Day show the board is becoming very concerned about the negative publicity. It has now grown bigger than the D3 debate and has become an embarrassment for the entire U of H community.
 

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What is amazing is that Gallagher has a very strong team coming back next year despite all this - I would say his best ever.

Tracy Carter (7th year point guard)
Moses Flowers (AE all rookie)
DeJuan Clayton (3 time all MEAC transfer)
Austin Williams (14ppg, 6rpg)
Jared Kimbrough (Lasalle transfer)
Hunter Marks(10ppg 6rpg)
 

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Discussion Starter · #726 ·
What is amazing is that Gallagher has a very strong team coming back next year despite all this - I would say his best ever.

Tracy Carter (7th year point guard)
Moses Flowers (AE all rookie)
DeJuan Clayton (3 time all MEAC transfer)
Austin Williams (14ppg, 6rpg)
Jared Kimbrough (Lasalle transfer)
Hunter Marks(10ppg 6rpg)
As far as I know Tracey is not returning.
 

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The pressure is coming from the media (both national and local) that have covered this story in a universally negative way. His dishonesty is now on display for literally millions of people to read about. How many care? I don't know. But 6000 people signed the petition to keep the Hawks at the D1 level and thousands more signed the petition to remove Woodward. Having your lack of leadership qualities publicized in this way is pretty hard for a typical university president to withstand. At a public university he would already be gone. We all know he has stacked the board with his people but how long can they act like nothing is wrong and this is all business as usual? Leaked emails to The Day show the board is becoming very concerned about the negative publicity. It has now grown bigger than the D3 debate and has become an embarrassment for the entire U of H community.
Do you have a link to that?
 

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Do you have a link to that?
Its in another scathing article:

Goldstein writes: "The p.r. fallout from the athletics decision is only growing. Do we have a more aggressive strategy to address our own staff working to raise community opposition to that decision?"
 

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Does anybody have a subscription to this in order to read the article?

WEST HARTFORD, Conn. — As his players warm up, swishing jumpers at three stations, John Gallagher sidles over to the press table and leans against the bumper, shaking his head. “Honestly,’’ he says, “I figured I’d have three players here.’’ Gallagher’s skepticism is hard-earned. On May 6, a little more than a month after Hartford made its first men’s NCAA Tournament appearance in school history, the university announced it was transitioning from Division I to Division III. The switch, which will be formally enacted with a final vote of the board of regents in January, won’t take effect until 2025 but the decision has created an uproar on the small campus. Students not only have protested the decision but booed so forcefully at graduation that embattled university president Gregory Woodward left the stage in the middle of the ceremony, explaining later that he didn’t want to be a distraction.
Alums, athletes and staffers are actively rooting for Woodward’s ouster, rumors and/or wishful thinking running rampant that he will resign or be forced out in a matter of days. A resume embellishment has added to the distrust, as has a lack of transparency around the board’s decision. Along with the catcalls at commencement, the end of the spring semester included marches and more than 1,300 flags planted on the campus, representing each of the athletes who signed a petition against the decision. One online petition, demanding the university remain Division I, has gathered 6,000 names.
As the controversy swirls, beneath the barned roof of the Reich Family Pavilion on a Wednesday morning, the Hawks — 11 of them (Moses Flowers is still recovering from hip surgery) — form in a wide circle to begin practice. Summer workouts and classes began a week ago, but the Hawks already are in full form. Gallagher begins the session as he always does, choosing a player to recite the thought for the day, as well as the offensive and defensive keys they’re working on. They nail each, even the message, word for word. “Excellence is not a long-term aspiration. Excellence is the ultimate short-term strategy. Excellence is the next five minutes,’’ Austin Williams says from memory.
The Hawks break off for shooting drills, the start to a high energy and efficient hour that includes only positivity. Gallagher salutes good decisions and smart passes, and the players’ encouraging voice and clapping drowns out the music that blares for the entirety of the practice.
It is entirely normal, and yet utterly remarkable.
With the allure of the new one-time transfer from the NCAA, more than 1,600 players have entered the transfer portal this season, each with their own reasoning, but most looking for some combination of the greener pastures of playing time, winning or security. Yet despite the uncertainty of the program’s long-time future and the chaos bound to come in the short term, only one player has left Hartford and none since the D3 announcement. In fact, two — DeJuan Clayton from Coppin State and Jared Kimbrough from La Salle — have joined the team.
At a time in college basketball when everyone seems to look for an exit ramp whenever things get difficult, the Hawks are charging full steam into hard. “I feel like we’re playing for something bigger,’’ says Williams, the team’s leading scorer. “This is for our legacy, and the future of our program. We’ve already built something here, but we want to make sure what we built can last.’’
Plopped in the middle of the detritus of basketball, amid the pieces of paper casually discarded and the collection of books, the trophy sits on a side table, a snipped net girdling its base. It deserves a more prominent location, what with it being the first in school history and all. But with everything going on, parading the America East tournament championship trophy around is, at best, awkward. Instead, it sits on the table in Gallagher’s cluttered office, almost like a tease. It’s both proof of what Hartford has accomplished and a reminder of what the program is about to lose.
The climb, as it usually is at programs with little history such as Hartford’s, has been arduous. The school made the jump to Division I in 1984, and limped to five winning seasons in its first 22 years. In 2006, the school hired Dan Leibovitz, a John Chaney assistant who played for Fran Dunphy, and the Philly boy brought along Gallagher, a Saint Joseph’s alum who worked under Speedy Morris at La Salle, to assist him. The two can spin the yarns common among young coaches trying to make a go of it, including one that ends with the hood of Gallagher’s car near blowing off, but by year two the Hawks won 18 games, the most in school history. A loss to UMBC in the league championship game denied them a shot at the NCAA Tournament. When Leibovitz left the school in 2010, Gallagher took over.
Success was not instant but the last four years easily have been the best in Hartford history, the Hawks winning 70 total games. In 2018, they played for the America East tournament title; in 2019, lost in double overtime in the league semifinals; and in 2020 were set to square off against Vermont for the championship when the season was called off. This year, seeded fourth, Hartford topped UMass Lowell to earn the school its first ticket to March Madness. When the game ended, Gallagher ducked under the bleachers and took a call from Leibovitz, who is now the associate commissioner for basketball for the Southeastern Conference, the two blubbering in amazement and delight.
Standing at practice a month later, Gallagher insists he has the best team he’s had in his career. He points at player after player, insisting one is the best 3-point shooter he’s had, and another the best playmaker. Of course everyone looks great in May, and Gallagher naturally breathes optimism as much as oxygen. But he’s not wrong, at least not on paper. Hartford returns five of its top six scorers, losing just senior Traci Carter and P.J. Henry, the lone man who opted to transfer. Clayton is a three-time All-MEAC selection who this past year averaged 14.9 points, 3.8 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.6 steals per game. Kimbrough, often saddled with injuries, struggled to find his footing at La Salle, averaging 5.9 and 3.6 in his final season, but plenty of suitors spied his 6-9, athletic frame and came calling, intrigued by his potential.
Just the other day D.J. Mitchell and Hunter Marks, both rising seniors, say they were discussing the team depth, marveling at how different it feels this year than any other. “Everyone is so invested in getting better, and has the right intention at every practice,’’ Marks says. “Mentally, we’re all in the right direction. It’s the most depth we’ve had by far. Coach Gal usually likes to play a small rotation. He might have to change that this year.’’

John Gallagher expected most of his NCAA Tournament team to transfer after the school’s decision to drop to D3, but instead everyone stayed. (David Butler II / USA Today)
This is what makes the players equal parts driven and angry. Like Gallagher, they have worked to get Hartford over the hump and feel like they’re finally at the precipice, where they can have realistic dreams of a steady stream of NCAA Tournament bids. They consider Vermont, long the high bar in the America East, and the climb the Catamounts made — years of empty Marches until, finally, a breakthrough in 2003 that has led to six more NCAA Tournaments and four NITs — and believe they could mimic the same program arc. The Neighborhood, as Gallagher dubbed his fan base, is growing beyond just the reaches of the head coach’s rather extended family. “When I committed, I got an endless amount of DMs all supporting me,’’ Clayton says incredulously. “People I didn’t even know, all reaching out, telling me how happy they were to have me. I never had that before.’’
That’s what made the decision to stay or go an actual nondecision. Every player had at least some sort of contact from another program, at least a sniff of curiosity to see if they’d be interested in leaving. Clayton actually found out about Hartford’s decision to go D3 when an assistant coach at another school called him with the news. Kimbrough says plenty of his friends questioned why he’d want to go to a place that devalued its athletics. None of them budged.
Gallagher says he will recruit “my tail off” in July like always. It will be, to say the least, complicated. He can’t and won’t make promises that he can’t keep but he will sell the message that this thing isn’t over, that there’s still a chance to change the vote. More than anything, he will sell the message that the team assembled in front of him has delivered, and hope that in them, future players can see what Hartford is really about. “They all stayed,’’ he says, his eyes wide with wonder. “That to me, that’s amazing. That is the most powerful moment I’ve ever experienced in coaching, and honestly, I can’t imagine one being better.’’
A banner hangs on the back wall opposite the benches, commemorating a man who never played a sport at Hartford. Walter Harrison served as the university president from 1998 to 2017, helping strengthen the university’s endowment as well as overseeing the construction or redesign of a number of university buildings.
A strong advocate of college athletics, Harrison also served on a number of NCAA committees, most significantly the Division I board of directors, and as chair of the presidents advisory committee, where he championed academic reform in athletics. In 2009, when NCAA president Myles Brand died, Harrison was on the short list of replacement candidates. In 2014, he received the NCAA’s President Gerald R. Ford Award, given to a person who “has provided significant leadership as an advocate for intercollegiate athletics.’’ Condoleeza Rice, Billie Jean King and Dick Vitale are among the other recipients.
Harrison’s Twitter account, inactive since 2020, includes a host of shoutouts to various Hartford teams, for their in-game successes as well as off-field achievements.
This year when the Hawks celebrated their NCAA Tournament berth, Woodward didn’t attend. “It’s funny, the president, our leader, he’s like the CEO in a business,’’ Mitchell says. “And he isn’t a part of it.’’
Though technically the decision to move to D3 was made by the board of regents, Woodward has taken the brunt of the heat, and has become an easy punching bag. Recently and in a twist of irony, he’s had to explain away some resume fudging, in which he insisted that, of all things, he was a former Division I athlete at Villanova. His bio on the university page long included a reference to his D1 soccer career, and in 2013, in the program for his inauguration as president at Carthage College, Woodward is referred to as a “composer, musician and one-time Division I soccer player.” As part of a 2017 interview with the UConn Foundation Woodward, who received his undergraduate degree from Connecticut, is said to have attended “Villanova University on a soccer scholarship. He transferred to UConn a year later because he missed music and Villanova didn’t have a music major.’’
Villanova, however, did not sponsor a Division I soccer team in 1973, when Woodward attended. In a letter explaining his absence at graduation, Woodward attempted to get in front of the pending storm by writing, “The University’s athletics program was of the highest caliber at the time and that has always been how I recalled my experience. However, I now know the NCAA formally created the current three divisions in 1973, with men’s soccer added in 1982, after my experience. Therefore, the team was not recognized as Division I when I played. I apologize for this inaccuracy and it has been corrected.”
While a Villanova spokesman said he could not quantify the men’s soccer program in the 1970s, he said the team mostly played local teams in Philadelphia, not a national schedule. The NCAA also confirmed that the first National College Division Soccer Championship was conducted in 1972. The only thing that happened in 1982? Villanova soccer joined the Big East.
People are calling for Woodward’s ouster over the claim, though the real heart of their ire lies with the decision to drop the athletics program to Division III. Weeks before the decision, Woodward went on an NPR radio show where he not only discussed his inflated soccer career, he waxed poetic about Hartford’s appearance in the NCAA Tournament and how exciting it was for the campus community. Yet since the decision has been announced, he has not met with the athletes on campus to discuss the decision, or answer questions about it. “It’s like we did all of this for nothing, at least that’s how it feels,’’ Williams says. “I don’t even think I’ve met the dude yet.’’
At the end of practice, the Hawks gather in another circle. Gallagher goes through a short laundry list of to-dos for the players, such as mundane tasks as filling out forms. Memorial Day weekend is coming, and he’s giving them a long break — no practice Friday or Monday. If anyone is sticking around, though, he reminds them to let him know. He’d be happy to have them over for an impromptu barbecue.
Finally, they gather at midcourt, arms raised in a huddle. “Neighborhood,’’ they say together. In the neighborhood, a good one at least, people look out for one another, watch each other’s backs. It’s a place you feel safe, and at home, a place you want to protect. The players are back here, enrolled in summer session, and back at practice, not just to be ready for the upcoming season; they’re here to fight for the Neighborhood, even if it means fighting against the very people who should be most fiercely defending it.
“To finally make the Big Dance, and have the rug pulled out from you like this, it’s like you’re saying we’re not worthy and we know we are,’’ Mitchell says. “But I’m not as angry as I was. Michelle Obama says it best. When they go low, we go high. We’re not going down without a fight, but we’re not going to stoop to their level. We’re going to do what we do best and let our actions on the court speak for us.’’
 

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It’s pretty powerful to me that so few players have transferred on the D3 news. Speaks volumes to the job Gallagher has done as HC.
 

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It’s pretty powerful to me that so few players have transferred on the D3 news. Speaks volumes to the job Gallagher has done as HC.
I was actually about to say the same thing. It does really say a lot about him as a coach, mentor, leader. He has created a culture there that is something special and it really is a shame we are going to lose that from the conference.
 

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Now former interim @HartfordHawks AD Maria Feeley will move on to the General Counsel position at Washington and Lee University in Lexington , Virginia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #739 ·
I think Woodward was a plant by UCONN to have someone on the inside who could blow up the school and therefore lesson the value so UCONN can take it over at some point to have UCONN at West Hartford. ...:)
 
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