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In the women's boxscore of the UHA/UMBC women's game today only 5 players played today on the UMBC team all for obviously 40 minutes.
 

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That's pretty funny. The only other thing similar that I've seen is when I was a student at Binghamton and Albany came to town with only 6 players (if I remember correctly) on their roster. On the stat sheet handed out to the students it said that Iati was averaging more than 40 minutes/game.
 

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Yes, in 2003-04 John Iati ended up averaging 40.04 minutes per game, taking only 19 minutes off all year (1121 of 1140, 28 games plus four overtime periods). Levi Levine averaged almost 38 mpg that same year.
 

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In the women's boxscore of the UHA/UMBC women's game today only 5 players played today on the UMBC team all for obviously 40 minutes.
That's sad for their bench players. Coach obviously lost all confidence in them.
 

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this is a question for the knowledgeable basketball fans:

Something tells me that this was probably the way basketball was played in its early days. was this the case?

In baseball the pitcher used to pitch entire games all the time back in the 60s,70s...etc... There wasn't such thing as a closer, or reliever, etc...

was it the same for basketball? were players expected to play 40 minutes before?
 

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If you look at the UMBC website, the article title for last night's game is "Women's Basketball Runs Out of Gas, Falls to Hartford, 51-44".

Gee, I wonder why they ran out of gas...
 

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Man, I don't understand this at all...what kind of message is this to the team? I have no idea what has been going on with them at all, but this certainly creates some divide I would think. Yeah, never seen anything like that before. Seems like it may be some sort of desperation move of some sort...
 

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If you look at the UMBC website, the article title for last night's game is "Women's Basketball Runs Out of Gas, Falls to Hartford, 51-44".

Gee, I wonder why they ran out of gas...

Losing by 7 to Hartford is a pretty good accomplishment for those 5 women
 

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this is a question for the knowledgeable basketball fans:

Something tells me that this was probably the way basketball was played in its early days. was this the case?

In baseball the pitcher used to pitch entire games all the time back in the 60s,70s...etc... There wasn't such thing as a closer, or reliever, etc...

was it the same for basketball? were players expected to play 40 minutes before?
You'd have to go back another generation before then to really check; for sure by the 60s players would be pulled for early foul trouble, for matchups, and style of play. It could be squad sizes were smaller then so everybody would have to play more minutes.

BTW that's kind of an urban legend about baseball; while starters were expected to finish if they were pitching well, there have been star relievers at least since the 1940s, but they could go two or three innings. It was just in the late 80s that the LaRussa system of middleman, setup and 3-out closer came in.
 

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Losing by 7 to Hartford is a pretty good accomplishment for those 5 women
Absolutely. They were up 37-31 with 7 minutes left. With a 5-13 record, you can probably feel the coach's pain knowing he risked a huge falloff if he brought in a sub but risked total collapse if he didn't.
 

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BTW that's kind of an urban legend about baseball; while starters were expected to finish if they were pitching well, there have been star relievers at least since the 1940s, but they could go two or three innings. It was just in the late 80s that the LaRussa system of middleman, setup and 3-out closer came in.
A bit of urban legend, but certainly a bit of truth as well. At the start of the 1900's, about 80% of games pitched were complete games. That dropped quickly to about 50% by 1910 and stayed around 45% until 1945. Since then it has dropped slowly but steadily -- around 30% in 1960, 20% by about 1975, finally dipping below 10% in about 1991 and then down to where we are today (2%).

Now back to our regularly scheduled show.
 
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