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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Am i the only one who thinks this team really misses SPREE??We just dont seem to have ant energy or fire...

The team looks good on paper,but they just sukkk on the court...

I think back when we went to the finals....Camby,LJ,ward houston and spree....

On paper we should be better now,but we arent.....

Say what you will about SPREE but I really feel he made this team go....

And i was in favor of the KVH...though i would have rather seen Houston go

opinions
 

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The Knicks would be a much better team with Spree instead of Van Horn cuz he has the killer instinct I would love to see Marbury with Spree.
 

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Everyone is tradeable except Marbury. Whole roster needs a re-vamp to become a championship contender.

I heard some type of deal for Memphis with us getting STromile Swift and Battier for some people. Need to look into that....
 

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who would we possibly give up? Neither of those guys make any money so it would have to be a two for one I'd imagine. Can't see one player who the Griz would really be after. Especially since we've already traded away two future 1st round picks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
LOL..which Genius...Your boy LAYDEN who signed him,or The genius Thomas who wants to dump him....

You really miss Eisly dont you???:heart:

What is it you like about Layden so much????:confused:

What is it you liked about the Knicks so much early in the year??:confused:

Do you always judge peoples performance after 3 weeks?:yes:

Do you realise you and Laden are quite similar?? :love:
 

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LOL..which Genius...Your boy LAYDEN who signed him,or The genius Thomas who wants to dump him....
Wasn't it Houston who signed him? It was NY who traded for him.

You really miss Eisly dont you???
Not really, I still don't hold Frank Williams in much higher esteem, though time will tell on whether it was worth taking on Penny's even more ridiculous contract.

What is it you like about Layden so much????
I don't like or dislike him, because more than half of his moves were forced upon him. The GM that never was.

What is it you liked about the Knicks so much early in the year??
A youth movement and a chase for the 8th seed. Right now the Knicks have scrapped the youth movement in pursuit of the 6th seed.

Do you always judge peoples performance after 3 weeks?
Why don't you ask your fellow Knick fans who have already passed their own judgement on Moochie Norris? I think I've been a good sport, considering Norris is Howard Eisley minus the jumpshot and A/T ratio. What else did Eisley have after that?

Do you realise you and Laden are quite similar??
Do you realize that you and I are quite similar?

Which means...

Layden = Rashidi = You.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
perhaps you are my long lost brother i never had...scary thought;)

by the way,that was the most direct post you have ever had..i knew you had it in you...

and for the record,i was not crazy about the starbury/penny deal...i like franks game and would have rather gotten a post player,and kept some of our youth.....

of course,i would have rather nuked the team.....
 

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If I'm not mistaken didn't Layden trade for Shandon, who was an expiring contract at the time, but them immediately extend his contract at an exorbatent amount? This was a move that most people should be killed for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i think Shandonn and eisly came over in the Rice trade...another savvy move by layden...not quite as bad as the spoon acquisition and certainly not as bad as overpaying houston by 50 million bucks.....
 

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If I'm not mistaken didn't Layden trade for Shandon, who was an expiring contract at the time, but them immediately extend his contract at an exorbatent amount?
Which means that it had to be done to make the deal work capwise. Shandon and Eisley >>> Glen Rice.

If Shandon and Eisley were cut today, they'd be still able to find work and be part of some team's rotation. Glen Rice was just cut from the Clippers.
 

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Originally posted by <b>Rashidi</b>!


Which means that it had to be done to make the deal work capwise. Shandon and Eisley >>> Glen Rice.
Unless it's a sign-and-trade I've never heard of having to give an extension to make a deal work capwise.

If Shandon and Eisley were cut today, they'd be still able to find work and be part of some team's rotation. Glen Rice was just cut from the Clippers.
Trading FOR Rice was the problem, Eisley and Anderson were desperate reprocussions.
 

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Originally posted by <b>Rashidi</b>!

Which is EXACTLY what I've been saying for a long time. Go talk to Dave Checketts, not Scott Layden.
Once again, Checkett's was the President of all of MSG's operations. His involvement was to okay a trading of Ewing, NOT to select who he was traded FOR. That was the GM's (Layden's) job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Rashidi,in your mind what function does the GM serve....

You cant say layden is responsible for signing the players that worked out and blame everything else on Checketts and Dolan..

If anything,Dolan was exceedingly fair with layden and especially Chaney..

You can NOT NOT NOT have the highest payroll in the league,miss the playoffs and start the year playing .300 ball and not expect to get fired...

i admire you freakish cultlike devotion to those closest to your heart:uhoh:
 

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It would appear what Rashidi liked about Layden (and I think this description is far too generous) is that Layden was a spineless lackey, who was willing to sell out the team by executing other's decisions in his own name, all the while collecting millions to do nothing but scam free pretzles from the underpaid concession girls and staying behind to try on Knicks' jock straps while they play away games.

That's what a good GM does...
 

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http://www.bupipedream.com/020305/sports/s4.html

NEW YORK – When Cablevision CEO James Dolan told former Madison Square Garden president Dave Checketts last May that he wanted to take charge of the New York Knicks, Checketts agreed to step down. But before walking out the door, Checketts warned Dolan it was time to tear the Knicks apart and start over because their 14-year run in the playoffs was over after a first-round loss to Toronto.

Checketts’ last words to Dolan were: “You ought to blow this place up because this mix didn’t beat Toronto, and we’ve gone as far as we can with it. We need to change things.”

According to an NBA source who spoke on the condition of anonymity, Checketts was prepared to rebuild when he essentially was forced out by Dolan, who wanted to replace him as governor, the person who speaks for the Knicks in league matters. Dolan didn’t listen to Checketts’ advice, and in the 10 months he has overseen operation of the team, the Knicks have fallen to last place in the Atlantic Division.

Now, they are faced with nightmare circumstances in which they have a league-high $85-million payroll, which is more than twice the $42-million NBA salary cap, and likely will be forced to pay at least an additional $30 million in luxury tax next season for a bad team.

Dolan declined comment. A spokesman said he doesn’t discuss internal matters at the Garden.

Many NBA executives trace the Knicks’ problems to the decision Checketts made – with Dolan’s approval – to trade franchise center Patrick Ewing to Seattle before the 2000-01 season. They could have forced him to play out the final year of a contract worth $16 million, then dropped him and deducted that amount from the payroll.

But Checketts and former general manager Ernie Grunfeld had rebuilt the Knicks on the fly once, and the NBA source said they believed they could do it again with a team that reached the 1999 Finals even after a season-ending injury to Ewing in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals. Cost was no object.

As for the Knicks, the NBA source said, Dolan’s philosophy was: “I don’t care about the cap. I don’t care about paying luxury tax. Our competitive edge is that we can spend.”

The Knicks parlayed that philosophy into a highly profitable run of nine consecutive seasons under Checketts in which they advanced at least to the second round of the playoffs before being eliminated early by the Raptors last year. Checketts since has become involved with a group of investors who have bid on two NBA teams that are up for sale.

Dolan and GM Scott Layden tried to continue down the same track, but they were derailed by bad decisions and unforeseen developments. Forward Larry Johnson was forced to retire because of injury; Dolan chose to give Allan Houston a maximum-salary contract worth $100.4 million over six years; Layden made an ill-advised trade of Glen Rice for overpriced backups Shandon Anderson and Howard Eisley, and Coach Jeff Van Gundy resigned unexpectedly after 19 games.

The whole chain of events was set in motion by the Ewing trade. According to the NBA source, Checketts reasoned it would do no good to keep him another year and deduct his salary from the payroll because the Knicks could not get under the cap as long as Johnson, Houston and Latrell Sprewell were on the team. With those three and Marcus Camby at center, they might need to add only one or two pieces to contend for a title.

Ewing and agent David Falk demanded a trade because the center believed he was being blamed in the media for everything that went wrong with the team and had lost the respect of the coaching staff in terms of his reduced number of shots. Because Ewing had a no-trade clause, he virtually was able to dictate terms of the three-team deal that sent him to Seattle and brought Lakers small forward Rice to New York.

Checketts was worried Ewing’s attitude would create an unworkable situation if he attempted to force the center to play out his contract. Ewing adamantly insisted to Checketts: “I am not playing here.”

When the Knicks gave Rice, also a Falk client, a four-year deal worth $36 million at the time of the trade, it was taken by some as a sign Falk had agreed to deliver another of his clients, center Dikembe Mutombo, to the Knicks. Mutombo was in his last year at Atlanta and had made it clear he wasn’t returning. The Knicks did pursue Mutombo, but only after the decision had been made to forge ahead without Ewing. Philadelphia later landed Mutombo with a better offer at last season’s trading deadline.

Trying last summer to continue patching the Knicks and keep them in the playoffs, Layden traded Rice for two backups in Anderson and Eisley whose combined contracts total $83 million and run through the 2006-07 season. He also signed forward Clarence Weatherspoon to a five-year deal worth $26.5 million.

The Knicks chose to max out Houston’s contract even though no other team could have paid him more than $72 million. Although it has been suggested in the Garden that it was a matter of keeping a promise made to Houston by Checketts, that isn’t completely accurate.

Two sources familiar with the situation say Checketts told Houston the Knicks would pay him more than anyone else but didn’t specifically say he would receive a maximum contract. When he signed, even Houston admitted he was surprised by the Garden’s generosity.

But it wasn’t a total shock based on Dolan’s spending philosophy. His standing order to Checketts, the NBA source said, was: “Don’t you ever lose a player over money. Don’t do it.”

As long as the right mix of players is in place, it’s a great philosophy. But make a couple of wrong turns, and what you’ve got is a major oil spill requiring years to clean up. Now that the mess has spread to his doorstep, perhaps Dolan will heed Checketts’ parting advice to “blow it up.”
 
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