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I have seen some postings that the NCAA has ruled that the 20-21 season will not count against student athletes eligibility. can anyone clarify if this is correct or not?
 

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I think we won't know all the details any time soon. Will there be any reason to redshirt this year? Would a RS then get five years of eligibility starting next year? What will be the transfer (including grad transfer) restrictions? Ie, could Bernie Andre play his grad year at UVM this year, pick up a one-year masters in education or one of those clown programs like "food systems", then transfer again next spring?

I think there will be a lot of nuances--and it's still only a proposal at this time and I'm still a little skeptical they'll go through with it. Didn't see this coming though after how quickly the NCAA shut the door over the spring on granting an extra year for 19-20 seniors. This seems like a 180.

Hopefully we'll have a better understanding the policy and implications when the meetings conclude at the end of today.
 

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Agree with the post. Just gotta say that food systems is actually really important. Quick grab from wiki "A food system includes all processes and infrastructure involved in feeding a population: growing, harvesting, processing, packaging, transporting, marketing, consumption, and disposal of food and food-related items. It also includes the inputs needed and outputs generated at each of these steps. " Without advancements in food systems, swathes of people would starve. And that's not even considering the sustainable aspect of agriculture. Don't take it for granted.
 

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Agree with the post. Just gotta say that food systems is actually really important. Quick grab from wiki "A food system includes all processes and infrastructure involved in feeding a population: growing, harvesting, processing, packaging, transporting, marketing, consumption, and disposal of food and food-related items. It also includes the inputs needed and outputs generated at each of these steps. " Without advancements in food systems, swathes of people would starve. And that's not even considering the sustainable aspect of agriculture. Don't take it for granted.
I recently saw an ad on Facebook for UVM's "Brewery Business Management" program... so let's compromise and use that as an exacmpe. I hold no bias towards food systems; just meant to paint a picture of a one-year masters degree where a grad transfer could Buster Bluth it.
 

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I can't wait for sixth-year senior Blanca Millan to win 2021-22 AE WBB POY.
I'd wonder if the Maine women's contingent of Euros wouldn't take their degrees back home and make some money playing professionally at that point.
 

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I'd wonder if the Maine women's contingent of Euros wouldn't take their degrees back home and make some money playing professionally at that point.
Is there money to be made playing women's professional basketball in Europe?

Sabrina Ionescu is making a whopping $68K in the WNBA and I'm sure she's the only player in that league capable of any type of meaningful, semi-lucrative endorsement deal (the USWNT soccer team has the market fairly well monopolized). I can't imagine there's anything worthwhile--or better than NCAA--with Europe's far less developed women's sport infrastructure.

It's possible thought that a lot of these European countries are very nationalist-oriented they can probably sign a fairly lucrative deal as a full-time member of their national team. Europeans love their FIBA play, sort of like how non-olympic international hockey is such a big deal in Europe.
 

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Is there money to be made playing women's professional basketball in Europe?
Someone else with greater knowledge can probably further this discussion, but the short answer to your question is "Yes...depending on the circumstances." In some places in Europe (Russia is often cited), the money is actually better than the WNBA.

But it's probably not unlike things on the men side: "Playing in Europe" is a broad generalization that doesn't mean just one thing. There's "being a top talent in a well-funded league" playing in Europe, and there's "ballin' out in the Finnish 2nd Division on a court marked for basketball, volleyball, and team handball" playing in Europe.

You're not gonna get rich, but you can make some money, have some fun...and it's probably easier if you're already a Euro.
 

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Many UVM student athletes have used a redshirt year to earn an accelerated masters degree (EvDunc and Giddens). Many like Sam Dingba have used it to have incredibly positive impact in our community. I am incredibly proud of them, and the "clown" program remark is, frankly, misguided and ignorant. Sadly, "heat but no light" hot takes are popular these days
 

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Someone else with greater knowledge can probably further this discussion, but the short answer to your question is "Yes...depending on the circumstances." In some places in Europe (Russia is often cited), the money is actually better than the WNBA.

But it's probably not unlike things on the men side: "Playing in Europe" is a broad generalization that doesn't mean just one thing. There's "being a top talent in a well-funded league" playing in Europe, and there's "ballin' out in the Finnish 2nd Division on a court marked for basketball, volleyball, and team handball" playing in Europe.

You're not gonna get rich, but you can make some money, have some fun...and it's probably easier if you're already a Euro.
Maine has some women who will be on the full national team roster, that would lend to them making some decent money playing in their domestic leagues. Anne Simon is on Luxembourg's national team roster, same with Anna Kahelin for Finland. Blanca will probably at least get a look in Spain, and Dor Saar will certainly in Israel.

Money and national team appearances aside, I'd assume that if travel restrictions continue and the US continues to be a negative outlier for virus containment a lot of people will want to go home.
 

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Is there money to be made playing women's professional basketball in Europe?

Sabrina Ionescu is making a whopping $68K in the WNBA and I'm sure she's the only player in that league capable of any type of meaningful, semi-lucrative endorsement deal (the USWNT soccer team has the market fairly well monopolized). I can't imagine there's anything worthwhile--or better than NCAA--with Europe's far less developed women's sport infrastructure.

It's possible thought that a lot of these European countries are very nationalist-oriented they can probably sign a fairly lucrative deal as a full-time member of their national team. Europeans love their FIBA play, sort of like how non-olympic international hockey is such a big deal in Europe.
UConn legends Sue Bird and Diana Taurasi were paid millions to play in Russia in the Winter, and only came home to play in the WNBA in the summer for the exposure and familiarity. Oddly enough, the owner of that Russian team turned out to be some sort of ex-KGB spy who may or may not be a Russian mob boss. But in general, women basketball players in Europe and certain parts of Asia are still paid more than in the WNBA.
 

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UConn legends Sue Bird and Diana Taurasi were paid millions to play in Russia in the Winter, and only came home to play in the WNBA in the summer for the exposure and familiarity. Oddly enough, the owner of that Russian team turned out to be some sort of ex-KGB spy who may or may not be a Russian mob boss. But in general, women basketball players in Europe and certain parts of Asia are still paid more than in the WNBA.
Very interesting learning about this Russian money for women's basketball players. Good for them for finding that success.

I was thinking western europe/france/UK/spain, etc. which is what I think of when I hear "play overseas/europe" and is still probably marginal-at-best from a pure financial perspective--not saying the experience alone isn't worth, at least for 2-3 years.
 

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There are lots of places where they make very good money. Turkey for instance has some very well paying leagues.
 

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There are lots of places where they make very good money. Turkey for instance has some very well paying leagues.
I was just looking at highest paid male vs female athletes. As everyone would expect, female tennis players dominate the rankings, making up 9/10 highest paid athletes led by Osaka and Serena Williams. Where as the men's top ten is much more diverse (Tiger, Roger Federer, Carson Wentz and Kirk Cousins (?? a bit out of left field--I thought Russell Wilson was highest paid), 3 soccer players and KD, Steph and Lebron).

I only bring this up because it corroborates that global sports fans don't see basketball as a "feminine" sport that they want to watch, unlike tennis, skiing or even soccer. It's nice to hear that there are a few exceptions to this like Turkey and Russia, but the overall the pay differential between what male and female basketball earn is probably one of the highest across all sports.

The sad reality is the focus of women's sports remains femininity and not the sport itself. Eg, Julie Ertz and Alex Morgan from the USWNT absolutely dwarf Megan Rapinoe's earnings ($4-$5M vs $400k for Rapinoe). Why? Well, to say the quiet part out loud Julie Ertz and Morgan are stunningly beautiful, feminine athletes adored by men and girls alike with massive endorsement potential, whereas Rapinoe is thought of as a butch lesbian with limited commercial marketability--the same conundrum many female basketball players find themselves in.
 
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