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This article was just posted by my colleague "The Broham"
It is not meant to hate on the Bulls, just to try to figure out what went wrong...

http://www.kfba.net/Articles/23937.aspx

As the Kookie Krumbles
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broham

While watching Scott Skiles lament his team's lack of consistency after a loss to Memphis, I had a revelation that made me want to hurl a beer bottle through the TV screen. The Bulls don't have a problem with consistency. They're consistently awful. Some revelation, you say sarcastically? Sure, the Bulls haven't won more than 30 games in any of the past six seasons, but this was supposed to be their breakout season. All the talent, the height, the athleticism, the skill brought by Tyson Chandler, Eddy Curry and Jamal Crawford were supposed to translate into Ws. So far, the Bulls have the second worst record in the NBA this season, and I don't see any hope of their current cast turning things around.

It's clear that Jerry Krause's master plan has failed. Krause believed that NBA titles were won with overwhelming talent. He saw that every single champion since 1980 has featured at least one top-five player, if not the best player in that given year. Once upon a time, Chicago had one, arguably two, super-dooper stars on their roster. Jordan and Pippen brought the team six rings. After they left town, Krause decided to blow up the Bulls.

By all accounts, implosion is the best way to rebuild a team. A bad record leads to good draft position, and letting veterans walk clears cap space. Kiki Vandeweghe has been lauded for blowing up the Nuggets. The difference between him and Krause? It looks like Kiki found his superstar (in Carmelo Anthony), while Krause never did. Part of the problem is that Chicago was unlucky with the lotto balls. The Bulls only got the top pick once, in 1999, which wasn't exactly a choice year to win the lottery. There was no Shaquille O'Neal coming out. No Tim Duncan. No Allen Iverson. No LeBron James. There was Elton Brand. A great player to be sure--but not the superstar Krause needed.

Two years later he traded Brand for the rights to the second pick in the 2001 draft, which he used to select high-schooler Tyson Chandler. Perhaps Chandler will become the player Brand already is, perhaps not. But does anybody think he'll turn into a top-five talent? I'd be much less surprised if Pau Gasol, the third pick in 2001, ascends to superstardom, but given the speculative nature of the draft, it's hard to blame Krause for picking Chandler ahead of him. It's also hard to blame him for taking fellow eighteen year-old Eddy Curry with the fourth pick of the evening. Curry has displayed flashes of brilliance in his two-plus NBA seasons, but he's also shown a questionable worth ethic (has anybody ever said that about Kobe, Duncan, or KG?), which has compelled current GM John Paxson to shop him around the league.

Joining Curry on the trading block are Krause's 2000 lottery selections: Marcus Fizer (chosen fourth), and Jamal Crawford (eighth). Fizer might be the most egregious pick from what is widely regarded as the worst draft in NBA history. Crawford, on the other hand, has a ton of potential---though not so much that he dissuaded the Bulls from using their 2002 and 2003 lottery picks on fellow point guards Jay Williams and Kirk Hinrich. Due to a near-fatal motorcycle accident this off-season, Williams might never ball again. Hinrich, a Skiles favorite, looks like he could run the Bulls offense for the next ten years. Good for Chicago. They found a point guard. And it only took them three drafts to do it.

Krause fared little better in the free agent market than he did in the draft. It's difficult to lure a marquee player away from his team; the collective bargaining agreement greatly favors the home squad. Not only can they offer more money, they can also offer an extra season. Extra cash and extra security were enough to convince Jermaine O'Neal and Jason Kidd to re-up with Indiana and New Jersey, instead of joining Tim Duncan in San Antonio.

For a superstar to move, he must be driven by something other than money. Karl Malone and Gary Payton came to Los Angeles for the opportunity to win a title. Krause's Bulls never offered that chance. They offered cold weather and a tainted legacy. As a result, they were only able to lure marginal players, such as Ron Mercer and Eddie Robinson, who they signed to big-money, long-term contracts, thereby losing valuable cap space.

As evidenced by the Elton Brand deal, Krause was not afraid to make trades. Unfortunately, his other swaps were just as detrimental. Maybe he thought he was acquiring a potential superstar two years ago when Indiana sent Jalen Rose to Chicago for Ron Artest and Brad Miller. Instead he wound up with a selfish player with a big contract, who spent a couple of disappointing years with the organization before Paxson shipped him off to Toronto. In the meantime, Artest and Miller have blossomed into All-Stars.

If Krause had not dealt with the Clippers or the Pacers, the Bulls could have had a front court of Miller, Brand, Artest, and Curry. Maybe none of these guys are top-five players, but a combo of two or three might bring Chicago a superstar. And even if Dallas wouldn't trade Dirk Nowitzki for Curry and Brand, Chicago would have the best collection of forwards and centers in the East--arguably in the entire NBA.

As importantly, they'd have the talent and cap space to play the free agent market this off-season. Brand, Miller, and Artest are scheduled to make a combined $26 million next year. Curry and Hinrich are on the books for $6.5 million. Had they never signed Eddie Robinson, they would have been able to make a serious run at Kobe. Even with ERob inked up, they could have pursued Steve Nash.

Think about that--a starting five of Brad Miller, Elton Brand, Ron Artest, Kobe Bryant, and Kirk Hinrich. Now think of the lineup Chicago trotted onto the court for its match-up with the Pistons earlier this month: Antonio Davis, Jerome Williams, Kendall Gill, Jamal Crawford, and Hinrich.

Yet again, it's time to blow up the Bulls.
 

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Well written. But I'm a lil confused - does the author feel that we should rebuild again, or is s/he being sarcastic? Of course I'm at odds of what we should do right now. Honestly, Pax is in quite the pickle right now, and regardless of what he chooses to do, someone will be yellling for his head. As it is now, fans are questioning his competance as an NBA GM due to his moves this summer and numerous trades with the Raptors. Thank God that Kirk is working out because I can already picture the picket lines had Kirk progressed at the pace that our rookies have in the past. Unfortunately it's time for Bulls' fans to chew their nails as the Feb. 19th trade deadlines looms. Paxson's actions (or inaction) will speak volumes about where he wants this organization to head. Trading Jamal will show that we've given up on C-Unit, while not trading him will state loudly that we intend on making Jamal our SG of the future. Trading Curry will effectively show that Krause's dream will never be realized, while keeping him might just be the confidence boost that he needs to "break out". Until then, it's just wait and see.
 
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