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Discussion Starter #1
You've got a problem when the media can write stuff like this and fans like me agree.

The NBA shouldn't bother pushing for contract length in the new CBA. The NBA ought to be pushing for an NFL-like system where players can be cut. It won't happen because it'll require a war, but it ought to happen.

I'm not suggesting the NBA go to a hard cap, just non-guaranteed contracts. Whats the downside of making players play for their money?

It's too easy to take the easy way out

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The trading deadline has passed, and if you're an NBA player unhappy, unfortunate or just mildly uncomfortable in your current surroundings, you should have learned a valuable lesson from the most recent transactions: Stop trying. It appears to be an effective way to get yourself out of your hard-luck situation.




Got practice? Sit out. Got an injury? Milk it. Got a chance to dive for a loose ball? Ha! Let it go out of bounds, Skippy.



The NBA is a funny place. When players sign contracts, teams actually expect the players to fulfill those contracts. That means playing on game nights and practicing on off-days. That also means teams can exercise their right to trade players. It's all written in the contracts, and teams assume players will abide by the contracts they sign.



Such assumptions are silly. As the past few months have shown, players have created a loophole, a way to stick it to the teams that signed them to big-money, long-term deals: They simply can roll back their effort. By not trying, by turning every bump, bruise and blister into a long-term injury, players can make themselves such nuisances that teams have no choice but to trade them.



It worked for Baron Davis, who claimed a foot injury would keep him out for two weeks — until a trade to the Warriors came up. Then, his injury miraculously healed. Not trying also worked for Vince Carter, who sulked his way out of Toronto and admitted he was dogging it.

Similarly, Tracy McGrady admittedly backed off his effort in Orlando last year. Not trying worked for Glenn Robinson, who did not want to play for coach Jim O'Brien in Philadelphia. It worked for Alonzo Mourning, who simply never showed up in Toronto, and for Jim Jackson, who refused to report to New Orleans.



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That is a drain on the league. One key issue in the collective bargaining negotiations is the length of contracts. The league would like a maximum of five years rather than seven. But the real issue is not the length of contracts — it's getting players to give an honest effort throughout their contracts.



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Either way, this problem has gotten out of hand, and it's hurting the image of the players as much as it is hurting the league — the players union should recognize that and work with the league to fix it. Most NBA players try. But, over the past few months, we've seen too many who didn't and got what they really wanted — a trade.

http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/story/3445616
The NBA is dealing with image problems on many fronts, but the front that deserves the most attention is protecting the "integrity of the game". If they can't do that, the rest won't matter. For my money, they're not doing very well.
 

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I've been writing about this periodically.

The CBA is just painful to consider because there's nothing free about the market it creates.

I've suggested something similar. Teams should be able to cut players and not have them count against the cap. The team would have to pay the contract, if it were guaranteed.

The union shouldn't care, in fact they should like it. Right now, there's players who can't make a roster because some guy like Mashburn who can't play but requires a roester spot. Let him be cut, and there's an open spot for a new player.

If the bulls wanted to cut, say, AD, he would be a FA and could play with any team that wanted him. The Bulls would still be on the hook for paying him what they owe.

The teams should like it because if they have a Mashburn situation, they aren't penalized by the cap and the roster spot because the player can't play.

Trades should be about bringing good players to your team, not about salary cap relief.
 

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I always wonder why people expect the sports world and athletes to be different from the real world and everyone in it.

Some people give 100%, some don't. I can speak from 15 years of working experience...90% don't even bother giving a 50% effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
MemphisX said:
I always wonder why people expect the sports world and athletes to be different from the real world and everyone in it.
Because they're under a microscope, they make obscene amounts of money...

In 2000, median household income in the city of Chicago was $49,222 for whites and $29,086 for blacks. Chicago's Hispanic householders reported a median income of $36,543, while Asians reported $40,519.

Chicago's wealthiest communities were mostly white North Side neighborhoods: Lincoln Park (median household income: $68,613) and Forest Glen ($68,269). Its poorest communities were nearly all black and mostly on the South or Far South Sides: Oakland ($10,739) and Riverdale ($13,178).

The median salary for an NBA player is $2.2 million.
 
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