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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
This is a pretty interesting story. What do you guys think should happen?

Sam Presti must be a genius, because he's apparently on the verge of convincing a Stanford graduate to give up $750,000 today for the promise of $750,000 later.

The Oklahoman's Darnell Mayberry detailed the Thunder's clever plans for No. 29 pick Josh Huestis, a 22-year-old Cardinal product who top prognosticators had going in the second round at best, not the late first. The Thunder have a packed roster and a full salary cap sheet, so Huestis isn't really needed in the immediate term. Presti, according to Mayberry, plans to convince Huestis to hold off on signing his $750,000 guaranteed contract for the 2014-15 season and instead sign a contract around $25,000 to join the NBA D-League for a year. Huestis would then sign his Thunder deal a year from now or maybe two, at which point the standard guaranteed rookie contract would begin.

This is lunacy. Huestis will likely play for OKC's D-League affiliate in Tulsa regardless of whether he signs the Thunder deal (again, worth about $750,000) or the D-League contract (again, worth about $25,000). The only reason for Huestis to take Presti's bait is to help the Thunder. And while I trust Huestis is a good team player, I would doubt that he's conceding a six-figure payday for something closer to the American minimum wage just to assist a team with a $70-million payroll (The NBA isn't commenting on Mayberry's report, and attempts to reach Huestis' agent to clarify the potential arrangement were unsuccessful).

What's more likely is what Dan Feldman discusses at Pro Basketball Talk, that this is the result of a pre-draft deal in which the Thunder agreed to take Huestis in the first round (something no other team was going to do) so long as he agrees to spend a year or more playing at D-League wages to help the Thunder out (something no actual first-round pick was going to do). As Feldman notes, this almost assuredly breaks the spirit of the NBA's draft rules, if not the letter.

If true, Huestis does get something in the deal: a guarantee of being an NBA player and signing an NBA contract ... someday. All he has to do is play for basically nothing for one year, something he has experience with thanks to the NCAA.

But all this is a violation of the players' union he'll join when he does sign that contract and it's an affront to other prospects who got bumped to the second round by the apparent deal. What Huestis really does is either let the Thunder flout roster size rules or allow team owner Clay Bennett to avoid paying the luxury tax. If more teams and prospects use this method to get around the salary cap, it lets owners get away with keeping D-League wages dirt cheap. There's no reason D-League players shouldn't make a living wage. The NBA is a $4 billion enterprise. There are a couple hundred D-League players who don't have NBA contracts any given year. It's not going to kill the owners to sprinkle some more dough on them.

You may ask how this is different than international "Eurostash" players discussed in my draft primer. Those draft-and-stash players are usually second-round picks, which means there's no guaranteed NBA contract regardless. The ones who go in the first round but stay overseas are absolutely making much more than $25,000. Dario Saric, the No. 12 pick in the 2014 draft, signed a deal playing him around $3 million a year to stay in Turkey for a couple of years. If OKC wanted Huestis to spend one or two years in Europe before signing his NBA contract, he'd certainly make much, much more than he would in the D-League.
http://www.sbnation.com/nba/2014/7/23/5925979/josh-huestis-thunder-nba-rookie-d-league
 

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Oladipo for the people
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There needs to be a better farm system in place. He should get his rookie deal but be allowed to play in the D-league and not have his contract count against the cap.
 

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Premium Member
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Eh, manufactured outrage. He wasn't getting selected in the first round otherwise, so two to three years out he should come out ahead financially. The players union has already come out as unofficially fine with this, I believe, so I don't see the problem. He leveraged being flexible to land a better job - if I say I'm willing to work weekends in a job interview and get hired over someone who can't be available between Friday night and Monday morning, did I circumvent proper etiquette or did I do what I had to to get ahead?
 

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Put some respeck on ma name!
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He knew the implications going into it, so I don't think you need to change anything.

If you want to prevent guys from being able to accept these types of signings in the future, then that's a different issue. Don't see how you can stop the Thunder now after the fact though.
 

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Premium Member
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He knew the implications going into it, so I don't think you need to change anything.

If you want to prevent guys from being able to accept these types of signings in the future, then that's a different issue. Don't see how you can stop the Thunder now after the fact though.
Agreed. They're not even denying him his contract, they're obligated to offer him his rookie deal at at least 80% of the scale, and they did. He just made a handshake agreement to not accept it for a year and he's chosen to stick to it. Technically, Huestis declined to sign with the Thunder.
 

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Limehouse Blues
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The only question is whether or not it violates the CBA. It doesn't violate the letter of the law so to speak, but it definitely violates the spirit of the agreement from the viewpoint of the Players Association. Beyond that this is two parties making an arrangement where both of them are assuming a level of risk and are hoping to be rewarded for gambling.

I would assume that something will be done to prevent this sort of thing becoming a pattern, especially as it is obvious that it could be abused.
 
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