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President of the Anti-Carbone Club
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I’m hoping New York finally shuts down a lot of the useless SUNYs. No reason to waste money operating tiny D3 schools with no degree value and total enrollments under 8,000. That money would be far better used on helping us.
 

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I’m hoping New York finally shuts down a lot of the useless SUNYs. No reason to waste money operating tiny D3 schools with no degree value and total enrollments under 8,000. That money would be far better used on helping us.
Kind of makes that $60M baseball complex at Binghamton look like even more of a white elephant...
 

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There’s an inordinate amount of colleges across this country that should have been closed years ago that will finally have their doors shut by this virus. It’s not the 1990s or even early 2000s anymore. I’ve been saying it for years, but now more than ever it’s becoming increasingly important where people choose to get their degrees. Imagine paying for a degree from a college that ceases to exist? Yikes.
 

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President of the Anti-Carbone Club
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Kind of makes that $60M baseball complex at Binghamton look like even more of a white elephant...
About that, the construction on it had to be delayed because its design came in over the $60M budget.

And then the pandemic stopped all construction either way, but maybe some things weren't meant to be
 

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There’s an inordinate amount of colleges across this country that should have been closed years ago that will finally have their doors shut by this virus. It’s not the 1990s or even early 2000s anymore. I’ve been saying it for years, but now more than ever it’s becoming increasingly important where people choose to get their degrees. Imagine paying for a degree from a college that ceases to exist? Yikes.
If UMBC shuts down, does that mean I have no more student loans?

...

I made that as a joke, but now that I think about it, will this be what finally pops the student loan bubble?
 

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If UMBC shuts down, does that mean I have no more student loans?

...

I made that as a joke, but now that I think about it, will this be what finally pops the student loan bubble?
I know you’re kidding, but I’d hope so.

Seriously though, imagine you or your parents spending anywhere from $30K-$50K on the absolute low end, upwards of who knows how much, for a college degree at a school that shuts down forever? It’s been happening gradually, but it’s coming for thousands of more graduates.
 

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If UMBC shuts down, does that mean I have no more student loans?

...

I made that as a joke, but now that I think about it, will this be what finally pops the student loan bubble?
If there any positives out of this mess, I hope one might be a long overdue re-think of the whole college experience. It’s a great experience for most, I imagine, but one whose return on investment has become terrible for many as well. As has been mentioned, too many marginal schools exist. And like a lot of things, we refuse to rethink the model in general. Not sure why other than it’s engrained. Does college have to mean 4 years? Could you do it in 3 with a more focused course load? Or how about two years online at a reduced cost and two years on campus? I don’t pretend to know the right answer but clearly the current approach is busted for the average student.
 

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If there any positives out of this mess, I hope one might be a long overdue re-think of the whole college experience. It’s a great experience for most, I imagine, but one whose return on investment has become terrible for many as well. As has been mentioned, too many marginal schools exist. And like a lot of things, we refuse to rethink the model in general. Not sure why other than it’s engrained. Does college have to mean 4 years? Could you do it in 3 with a more focused course load? Or how about two years online at a reduced cost and two years on campus? I don’t pretend to know the right answer but clearly the current approach is busted for the average student.
As someone who has a college freshman entering in the fall (Tufts)....I am very concerned. Actually today was the first day I feel a little more hope as this Gilead drug trial in Chicago is showing some very nice results. Granted until there is a vaccine we would need a type of drug like an antibiotic that once taken starts to relieve symptoms and takes away the contagion. Even with US fast tracking the possible vaccines (and that is assuming they are successful trials) I think China/Israel and Germany will have vaccines before we do so "possibly" next January we have the ability to buy vaccines from other countries. My businesses are secondary to this (I am really running these businesses right now to just to get my workers their paychecks as they rely on me......and don't get me started on this PPP disaster). I just truly want my daughter to get that college experience....especially the freshman year. I hate to have her sit out a year now. It is already so depressing that the actual fun parts of high school now are gone (prom/graduation/plus a bunch of the fun things they plan). CRAZY world!

Funny enough.... the thing I can't wait for right now is the NFL draft.....gives us some semblance of normalcy (as an aside for about 10 years I was one of those idiots that waited outside Madison Square Garden at 4AM with my buddies to go watch the draft every year).
 

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Read an article BU is preparing a plan for students to return to campus in January 2021.

Grab the popcorn. Find a good movie on TNT. We’re gonna be inside for a bit. Sports?
The BU option is one of the contigency plans they are looking at. They would have one semester starting in January and one in the summer. They are talking to other Boston area schools as it would be nice if most schools did the same thing. I would MUCH prefer this option to the option of fall semester is done online. Online is zero college experience. The next 6 weeks are cruicial in hopefully getting this virus under some control.....and then pray like Sars it somehow never comes back in the fall (they thought that Sars was going to come back and somehow it never did).
 

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There’s an inordinate amount of colleges across this country that should have been closed years ago that will finally have their doors shut by this virus. It’s not the 1990s or even early 2000s anymore. I’ve been saying it for years, but now more than ever it’s becoming increasingly important where people choose to get their degrees. Imagine paying for a degree from a college that ceases to exist? Yikes.
I agree ..you are going to see massive closures if this goes into the fall. Small liberal arts schools are effed.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Realist/A-hole
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Without a vaccine, life as we knew it is over.
Life is over as you knew it every day you wake up. The changes are just more drastic here. Natural selection always has it's say...eventually.
 

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If there any positives out of this mess, I hope one might be a long overdue re-think of the whole college experience. It’s a great experience for most, I imagine, but one whose return on investment has become terrible for many as well. As has been mentioned, too many marginal schools exist. And like a lot of things, we refuse to rethink the model in general. Not sure why other than it’s engrained. Does college have to mean 4 years? Could you do it in 3 with a more focused course load? Or how about two years online at a reduced cost and two years on campus? I don’t pretend to know the right answer but clearly the current approach is busted for the average student.
It can absolutely be done differently and is done differently everywhere else in the world. My son is doing his undergraduate work at one of the top universities in the UK. The Bachelor of Science in Economics is a three year degree. Granted, there's no basketball or football team, and there isn't time for "Introduction to Musical Theater" in his courseload -- but his tuition is also only $35K per year and he gets to spend 3 years living in central London.

Closer to the board subject, changes seem to be coming to college sports. The simple loss of NCAA basketball tournament money is going to hasten the end of many non-revenue sports at the P5 schools. If this delays or kills the 2020 college football season, then... wow. Just wow.
 

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Speaking of which, per WCAX looks like Northern Vermont Lyndon campus, NV-Johnson campus closing and VTC in Randolph all closing those campuses.

Not only is that sad news for graduates/students but have to imagine jobs at those schools in those particular areas of Vermont had to be some of the better paying opps. Huge hit to those communities.
 

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Speaking of which, per WCAX looks like Northern Vermont Lyndon campus, NV-Johnson campus closing and VTC in Randolph all closing those campuses.

Not only is that sad news for graduates/students but have to imagine jobs at those schools in those particular areas of Vermont had to be some of the better paying opps. Huge hit to those communities.
As painful as it is, the restructuring is badly needed. Johnson and Lyndon have been in steep decline and you need to take a look at your eggs and realize when they won’t hatch. I like the idea of centralizing traditional 4-year programs at Castleton. While places like Bennington and the NEK are surely isolated, Vermont is still such a small state that we don’t need traditional residential state colleges in every corner of the state. On the other hand, low/no-residency Community Colleges that give out associates in nursing and dental hygiene are needed throughout the state. Shuttering Lyndon and Johson could free up resources to bolster the CCV system.

Perhaps this could make Castleton lot more attractive for VT & out-of-State students alike who previously would’ve never considered any of the VT state colleges. Maybe Castleton will be able to upgrade to the NE-10.

That said, the Chancellor is still too bold with this plan. I think it will be dead-on-arrival in the Vermont legislature. But nor will the legislature provide enough resources to get those campuses where they need to be. The Chancellor wants to chop the arm off on a butcher‘s block while the legislature will only be willing to give him a butter knife.
 

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President of the Anti-Carbone Club
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New York needs to follow suit. Time for Cobleskill, Canton, Morrisville, Delhi, Potsdam and Fredonia, etc to say goodnight. Pretty sure you could choose any four of those and fit every student that goes to that combo of four inside LaValle Stadium.
 

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Not only is that sad news for graduates/students but have to imagine jobs at those schools in those particular areas of Vermont had to be some of the better paying opps. Huge hit to those communities.
Randolph is finally starting to realize it’s potential. I think they could be ok. It’s commutable to both the Montpelier and the Upper Valley (Hanover/Lebanon/WRJ) which is very stable, largely due to the academic medical center DHMC. Nice to see some encouraging businesses pop up in randolph itself like LEDdynamics and GW Plastics (makes parts/contract manufacturers for medical device industry). But of course they say they’re doing well in Randolph because of partnerships with VTC....

Johnson and Lyndon on the other hand are bleak. A lot more geographically isolated and that’s probably part of the reason the schools were declining precipitously before hand. I had a coworker who’d commute into South Burlington from Johnson or Jeffersonville....crazy hour-long drive each direction. I hear anecdotes that a lot more people are commuting into Chittenden County from that area; housing costs are just so much cheaper. Is that what we want rural Vermont to turn into though?
 

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I work in Burlington and commute from Barre. Roughly a 45 minute drive each way. Even with the cost of gas high, it's worth it financially. Housing in Chittenden county is ridiculously high priced. I don't know how young people fresh out of school can manage it. They should be keeping the VTC campus open. They should probably start by just axing one of the two NVU campuses instead of both. That would have been a lot more palatable to the legislature.
 

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New York needs to follow suit. Time for Cobleskill, Canton, Morrisville, Delhi, Potsdam and Fredonia, etc to say goodnight. Pretty sure you could choose any four of those and fit every student that goes to that combo of four inside LaValle Stadium.
I can't speak to the other schools, but I know for a fact that Fredonia has seen a significant increase in enrollment since they started offering free tuition to in state students. My daughter is a rising senior at Fredonia, so I don't share your enthusiasm for shutting down the rest of the state schools so your own which is already well funded can have more money. Your NYC bias is reflecting poorly on you.
 

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This was a long time coming, these highly distributed state school systems that we have on the east coast make no sense, it was inevitable. You end up with 5 crappy schools, instead of 1 less crappy secondary state school. Castleton is the only school in that system that has improved itself in the last twenty years, integrate them all into that.
 
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