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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


Under today's defensive 3 seconds rule, a paint defender must be within "armslength" of an opponent to stay in the lane.. http://www.nba.com/nba101/misunderstood_0708.html

In today's game, Eaton would draw a technical after 3 seconds because Cartwright is out of "armslength" reach, but in previous eras, Eaton is legal because Cartwright only needs to be "adjacent to the paint":


Here's the original rule from 1982: (http://www.nba.com/analysis/rules_history.html)

1981-82
"Defender on post player is allowed in defensive three-second area (A post player is any player adjacent to paint)".​

So just by substituting the rule's own parenthetical reference, the rule translates EXACTLY to: "Defender on player adjacent to the paint is allowed in defensive 3 second area."

There is a quote from then-commissioner Larry O'Brien saying the old 3-seconds rule was meant to open up the lane, but in reality, the league didn't even know what spacing was at the time like we do today... The way people thought about the game back then was 180-degrees different from the way we think about the game today, so O'Brien's standard in 1982 of what a clear lane was does not compare to our current standard, which is why the old 3-seconds rule was replaced in 2001, in an attempt to "open up the game", as the NBA has stated.

The old rule had been incredibly simple in saying that anytime your man is "adjacent to the paint", you can stay in the lane.. The paint is a huge, 16-foot area, so a player "adjacent to the paint" is almost always out of "armslength", especially considering "adjacent to the paint" meant right next to the paint, a few feet outside the paint, or all the way out to the 3-point line... The GIF's below showing shooters at the 3-point line being guarded by paint-campers is the best example of how the old rule and its "adjacent to the paint language was designed to allow players to camp in the paint:



GIF's of Shooters At 3-Point Line Being Guarded By Defenders Camping in Paint:


The old 3 seconds rule allowed players to camp in the paint so much, that players could camp in the paint while their man was behind the 3-point line - on every possession, there were paint-campers guarding players who were behind the 3-point line, or at least far outside the paint.

I can post literally thousands of clips like the ones below... The ones listed below are from a single, run-of-the-mill Jordan highlight video:



1) Armstrong in far-corner being guarded by paint-campers (this one's actually from a different vid):





2) Pippen in near-corner, guarded by paint camper:





3) Craig Hodges in near-corner AND Sellers near-sideline, both guarded by paint campers:





4) Pippen at top of key AND Paxson far sideline being guarded by paint-campers:





5) Paxson on far sideline is being guarded by paint-camper:





6) Pippen (top of key) and Armstrong (far sideline) being guarded by paint-campers:





7) Paxson is near the top of key, guarded by habitual paint-camper, Price:





8) Pippen in far-corner, guarded by paint-campers:

 

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The old rule had been incredibly simple in saying that anytime your man is "adjacent to the paint", you can stay in the lane.. The paint is a huge, 16-foot area, so a player "adjacent to the paint" is almost always out of "armslength", especially considering "adjacent to the paint" meant right next to the paint, a few feet outside the paint, or all the way out to the 3-point line... The GIF's below showing shooters at the 3-point line being guarded by paint-campers is the best example of how the old rule and its "adjacent to the paint language was designed to allow players to camp in the paint:
how often was 3 seconds called before 2001? was it ever called?
 

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all the time but there was less stretching of the floor back in the day because teams took a ton less 3s
 

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I watched the Sonics vs Jazz 1996 Western Conference Finals series a year or two ago - illegal defence calls were a big part of that series on both ends. So it was definitely called quite heavily in the back half of the 90s - I didn't watch any NBA before then.
 
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