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Discussion Starter #1
If a semi-truck were traveling down the highway, would another vehicle be able to drive up a ramp into its trailer?

Seems to me the inertia would cause it to go skidding through the cabin.

Anyway, I just saw a commercial where this "appeared" to be successful.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Originally posted by <b>jackiejackal</b>!
I saw it on Fear Factor !;)
I don't get it.

Seems to me, the second the trailing car hits the ramp, at that precise moment, its tires would be spinning at whatever mph it is going. How can they suddenly stop and keep from skidding on through?
 

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Originally posted by <b>ABM</b>!


I don't get it.

Seems to me, the second the trailing car hits the ramp, at that precise moment, its tires would be spinning at whatever mph it is going. How can they suddenly stop and keep from skidding on through?
Nope. The way I understand it is if the truck is going say, 60 mph and the car is going 80 mph, it's pretty much the same as if the car is going 20 mph on a stationary ramp. This is the way these type of problems were handled in the physics classes I've taken.
 

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Originally posted by <b>Captain Obvious</b>!


Nope. The way I understand it is if the truck is going say, 60 mph and the car is going 80 mph, it's pretty much the same as if the car is going 20 mph on a stationary ramp. This is the way these type of problems were handled in the physics classes I've taken.
So if thats the case wouldn't both of them have to be going the same exact speed for it too work?

BFreak.
 

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Like ABM said, the biggest problem most people have with visualizing this is the high speed that the tires would be spinning on the way up the ramp. One concern is that the energy it would take to slow down the fastly spinning tires would take away from the kinetic energy of the car and thus not allow it to climb up the ramp. This is why when the stunt is performed the car has to be driven at a reasonably higher speed than the speed of the ramp and the truck. It has to be going fast enough to overcome this loss of energy (even though it's a rather inconsequential loss) but once the car is up on the ramp the brakes need to be applied accordingly. If you're going too fast you'll have to slam on the brakes but if you do it right I'm pretty sure you could break normally into position on the back of the truck.
 

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Originally posted by <b>jackiejackal</b>!
Here is my attempt !
:D
I see why ABM was worried about what would happen!:laugh:
 

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Originally posted by <b>Backboard Cam</b>!
It can be done, Knight Rider did it all the time.
But you also have to take into account the total mass memory of a super genius car like KIT. Because it was engineered to read multiple frames within a unit of time, KIT was hardwired to process thought like a human being would... with everything but genetic code writen on a double helix, KIT was able to compensate for David Hasslehoff's human errors when speeding his way up through the ramp. It's simple if you think about it... duh :rolleyes:


:grinning:
 

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You said a moving truck, but did you say how fast?
 

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You'd better have a real wheel drive care, or a front wheel drive going backwards, or you are going to have trouble I think.
 

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Originally posted by <b>Paxil</b>!
You'd better have a real wheel drive care, or a front wheel drive going backwards, or you are going to have trouble I think.
Nah... front wheel drive would work, perhaps even better. You get to brake earlier -- the back wheels will spin the same as they always did; they don't know whether the front wheels are pulling the car, or the car is simply being towed on a ramp.

The inertia of the wheels is trivial compared to that of the car. This is especially true of high performance cars, where the wheels and tires are designed to be as light as possible. If the car goes into neutral the instant the tractive wheels are on the ramp, then any inertia in most of the transmission is also neutralized and does not have to be compensated for.

In the simplest sense: the car only has to brake the speed differential it has between car speed and truck speed (plus the very small amount of wheel inertia) -- zero speed is not relevant.

The car would have to be driven up the ramp with authority. There will be a tense moment when the front wheels are partially in contact with the ground, and partially in contact with the ramp. I'd imagine that if done very slowly, it would cause some pretty bad things. But done quickly, there would just be a small amount of burnt rubber.

Without crunching the numbers, I'd figure that a good driver could put a car on the ramp and stop within 10 feet.
 
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