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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if the games are broadcast in HD. I know the NFL pass is, so that would be lovely is the NBA is. I just got my dad an awesome HD 50 inch set for his birthday and I'm drooling at the thought of HD league pass!

Thanks!
 

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Skokie, IL 60076
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The league pass is just access to the local broadcasts. It really does depend on 2 things

1) If the original local broadcast was digitally filmed. So some games still might not be. (I wonder if League Pass will prefer picking up the HD broadcast, whether it be home or away telecast) I know all Bulls home games on WGN will be HD. Comcast sports chicago is doing all home games HD as well.

2) If your cable provider has NBA HD channels. NBA TV for you will be in HD.

I believe Dish Network is channel 9466

Directv is 198 (?)

Echostar is 9425

check this page http://www.nba.com/schedules/national_tv_schedule/NBATVHighDef/ for NBA TV HD. All ESPN games are HD (I think) is TNT HD yet?
 

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Thanks a lot for the help. The main reason I'm getting the league pass is so I can watch the Bulls play while I'm here in NJ.

Since it seems most of the local games will be shot in HD, I'm guessing those will be shown on the league pass in HD as well.

awesome
 

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What is NFL pass? Is that different from "NFL Ticket" I have Comacst Cable and none of the NFL games are offered. At least I haven't seen anything.

As for League pass, the only thing offered on HD are local sports games(California). I had league pass last year and it was not HD. In fact the quality on some of the Bulls games was pretty bad. I'll still get it once the season starts. :grinning:
 

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Skokie, IL 60076
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Originally posted by <b>Darius Miles Davis</b>!
To my knowledge, the only cable company who has the rights to offer the NFL package is Direct TV, which frickin' sucks for me, because I can't have a dish in my apartment complex.
Illegal.

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

As directed by Congress in Section 207 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the Federal Communications Commission adopted the Over-the-Air Reception Devices Rule concerning governmental and nongovernmental restrictions on viewers' ability to receive video programming signals from direct broadcast satellites ("DBS"), multichannel multipoint distribution (wireless cable) providers ("MMDS"), and television broadcast stations ("TVBS").

The rule is cited as 47 C.F.R. Section 1.4000 and has been in effect since October 14, 1996. It prohibits restrictions that impair the installation, maintenance or use of antennas used to receive video programming. The rule applies to video antennas including direct-to- home satellite dishes that are less than one meter (39.37") in diameter (or of any size in Alaska), TV antennas, and wireless cable antennas. The rule prohibits most restrictions that: (1) unreasonably delay or prevent installation, maintenance or use; (2) unreasonably increase the cost of installation, maintenance or use; or (3) preclude reception of an acceptable quality signal.

Effective January 22, 1999, the Commission amended the rule so that it also applies to rental property where the renter has an exclusive use area, such as a balcony or patio.

On October 25, 2000, the Commission further amended the rule so that it applies to customer-end antennas that receive and transmit fixed wireless signals. This amendment became effective on May 25, 2001.

The rule applies to viewers who place antennas that meet size limitations on property that they own or rent and that is within their exclusive use or control, including condominium owners and cooperative owners, and tenants who have an area where they have exclusive use, such as a balcony or patio, in which to install the antenna. The rule applies to townhomes and manufactured homes, as well as to single family homes.

The rule allows local governments, community associations and landlords to enforce restrictions that do not impair the installation, maintenance or use of the types of antennas described above, as well as restrictions needed for safety or historic preservation. In addition, under some circumstances, the availability of a central or common antenna can be used by a community association or landlord to restrict the installation of individual antennas. In addition, the rule does not apply to common areas that are owned by a landlord, a community association, or jointly by condominium or cooperative owners. Such common areas may include the roof or exterior wall of a multiple dwelling unit. Therefore, restrictions on antennas installed in or on such common areas are enforceable.
 

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Originally posted by <b>spongyfungy</b>!


Illegal.

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

As directed by Congress in Section 207 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the Federal Communications Commission adopted the Over-the-Air Reception Devices Rule concerning governmental and nongovernmental restrictions on viewers' ability to receive video programming signals from direct broadcast satellites ("DBS"), multichannel multipoint distribution (wireless cable) providers ("MMDS"), and television broadcast stations ("TVBS").

The rule is cited as 47 C.F.R. Section 1.4000 and has been in effect since October 14, 1996. It prohibits restrictions that impair the installation, maintenance or use of antennas used to receive video programming. The rule applies to video antennas including direct-to- home satellite dishes that are less than one meter (39.37") in diameter (or of any size in Alaska), TV antennas, and wireless cable antennas. The rule prohibits most restrictions that: (1) unreasonably delay or prevent installation, maintenance or use; (2) unreasonably increase the cost of installation, maintenance or use; or (3) preclude reception of an acceptable quality signal.

Effective January 22, 1999, the Commission amended the rule so that it also applies to rental property where the renter has an exclusive use area, such as a balcony or patio.

On October 25, 2000, the Commission further amended the rule so that it applies to customer-end antennas that receive and transmit fixed wireless signals. This amendment became effective on May 25, 2001.

The rule applies to viewers who place antennas that meet size limitations on property that they own or rent and that is within their exclusive use or control, including condominium owners and cooperative owners, and tenants who have an area where they have exclusive use, such as a balcony or patio, in which to install the antenna. The rule applies to townhomes and manufactured homes, as well as to single family homes.

The rule allows local governments, community associations and landlords to enforce restrictions that do not impair the installation, maintenance or use of the types of antennas described above, as well as restrictions needed for safety or historic preservation. In addition, under some circumstances, the availability of a central or common antenna can be used by a community association or landlord to restrict the installation of individual antennas. In addition, the rule does not apply to common areas that are owned by a landlord, a community association, or jointly by condominium or cooperative owners. Such common areas may include the roof or exterior wall of a multiple dwelling unit. Therefore, restrictions on antennas installed in or on such common areas are enforceable.
Interesting that you should post that. My dad just told me the same thing in a conversation today. Anyway, my apartment faces North, not South, so I don't think I could pull it off anyway. But I'm satisfied with my Cox digital cable with DVR, especially because it has...the NBA Package.

I'll have to hit some local sports bars to catch the Bears, if they're worth catching.
 
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