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What is next after the $60 million fine and 4 year bowl probation could be the death to the Penn State Football program - Expulsion from the Big 10 conference.

The good people outside of Happy Valley have to send the Penn State community a message "YOU DO NOT GET TO SET YOUR OWN RULES and live in isolation".

They need to clean house.
 

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If the Freeh report is accurate, it is amazing to me that the PSU president has not been charged with anything yet. But I have a feeling that the resolution process for this horrible debacle has only just begun.
 

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What is next after the $60 million fine and 4 year bowl probation could be the death to the Penn State Football program - Expulsion from the Big 10 conference.

The good people outside of Happy Valley have to send the Penn State community a message "YOU DO NOT GET TO SET YOUR OWN RULES and live in isolation".

They need to clean house.
It seems odd to me the monetary damage, which has nothing to do with the NCAA. Isn't this what the criminal process does in real courts?
 

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It seems odd to me the monetary damage, which has nothing to do with the NCAA. Isn't this what the criminal process does in real courts?
The NCAA is sending its own message about priorities and what should have been done. They're taking the same position as most people on this matter: that it was a calculated, egregious cover-up, concerning heinous acts that should never have been allowed and were certainly allowed to go on much too long at the expense of Sandusky's many victims.

If you're wondering about how they came to the $60 million figure, it's my understanding that it equates to one year's annual revenue for the PSU athletic department.

Otherwise, the B1G also has inflicted its own monetary punishment: Penn State will not receive its B1G distributions for the duration of the bowl ban.

Between the actions taken by the NCAA and B1G, I don't see how Penn State will be in any position to field football teams that don't put to risk the players that suite up for for it from here through the ban period. As many have noted, though it would be hard on the local Happy Valley economy, a one or two year death penalty would have been less crippling than all this.
 

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The Big Ten will not expel Penn State, because that would only hurt Big Ten schools. It's the exact same reason why Penn State did not get the death penalty or a TV ban. It's the reason why the death penalty and TV ban will never be handed down again to anyone.

The punishment of Penn State is about punishing Penn State as much as possible without undue collateral damage. The NCAA and Big Ten got it right.
 

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The Big Ten will not expel Penn State, because that would only hurt Big Ten schools. It's the exact same reason why Penn State did not get the death penalty or a TV ban. It's the reason why the death penalty and TV ban will never be handed down again to anyone.

The punishment of Penn State is about punishing Penn State as much as possible without undue collateral damage. The NCAA and Big Ten got it right.
We will see if they got it right. Fining PSU 60 Million is fining the state of Penna. Will the legislature want to cough it up?
 

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The 60 million can only come from revenue generating sports, I believe.

As a Big 10 alum/fan, I say kick them out and replace them with Notre Dame... though that seems unlikely for a multitude of reasons.
 

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The Big Ten will not expel Penn State, because that would only hurt Big Ten schools. It's the exact same reason why Penn State did not get the death penalty or a TV ban. It's the reason why the death penalty and TV ban will never be handed down again to anyone.

The punishment of Penn State is about punishing Penn State as much as possible without undue collateral damage. The NCAA and Big Ten got it right.
Per a fellow Xavier fan's explanation:

"the "death penalty" is basically a slang term for what is really called the "repeat violator rule." Emphasis on "Repeat." In order for it to be considered, it has to be an offense that a school has already been punished for committing, but has committed again within five years. It does not apply to this situation, nor does it apply to most situations when the media begins throwing it out there. Just a little FYI for everyone. Penn State might be a very extreme and aggregious example, but it still their first time committing and being punished for this type of violation. Now, if they do it again in the next five years, then they'll get the death penalty."

They could have ruled for Penn State to terminate its program for a period of time or indefinitely, but not under the standing so-called "death penalty" provision to which most everyone has been referring.
 

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The penalty is understandable but I am uncomfortable with the lack of due process. Will the NCAA president now be the new Kennessaw Mountain Landis, ruling with college sports with absolute authority under a "best interest of college sports clause"?
 

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Per a fellow Xavier fan's explanation:

"the "death penalty" is basically a slang term for what is really called the "repeat violator rule." Emphasis on "Repeat." In order for it to be considered, it has to be an offense that a school has already been punished for committing, but has committed again within five years. It does not apply to this situation, nor does it apply to most situations when the media begins throwing it out there. Just a little FYI for everyone. Penn State might be a very extreme and aggregious example, but it still their first time committing and being punished for this type of violation. Now, if they do it again in the next five years, then they'll get the death penalty."

They could have ruled for Penn State to terminate its program for a period of time or indefinitely, but not under the standing so-called "death penalty" provision to which most everyone has been referring.
The fact that the NCAA gave Penn State punishment set a precedent. There is no guideline for this type of action. They could have given whatever penalty they wanted to give. This was an action taken far outside the NCAA handbook.

The repeat offender rule does not state the death penalty must be used when a school on probation commits another major violation, it merely makes it an option. It won't ever be used again in a revenue generating sport. It just won't. The SMU death penalty didn't just kill SMU, you could argue it killed an entire conference. There is a reasonable chance the Big 12 would have never existed without the SMU ruling.
 

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If the recent allegations against the University of Miami are true, expect them to suffer severe punitive action. They are considered repeat offenders and have violated NCAA regulations since the 80s. If the recruiting violations during Golden's tenure are compounded with the Nevin Shapiro scandal they have a real chance to get the death penalty.
 

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I'm amused that ExplorerSteve can get so incensed over pedophilia at PSU but still believes the Pope had nothing to do with covering up THOUSANDS of cases of pedophilia. Can we kick the Catholics out of Christianity?
 

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The fact that the NCAA gave Penn State punishment set a precedent. There is no guideline for this type of action. They could have given whatever penalty they wanted to give. This was an action taken far outside the NCAA handbook.

The repeat offender rule does not state the death penalty must be used when a school on probation commits another major violation, it merely makes it an option. It won't ever be used again in a revenue generating sport. It just won't. The SMU death penalty didn't just kill SMU, you could argue it killed an entire conference. There is a reasonable chance the Big 12 would have never existed without the SMU ruling.
I agree with everything you wrote here.

My earlier response was to simply point out that the NCAA was in no position to invoke the so-called death penalty in this case, because Penn State did not have a prior history of coaches ruining/damaging young boys' lives.
 

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The NCAA always has had the right to suspend a program for lack of institutional control even if they're not a repeat violator.

The NCAA is also too scared to give the death penalty out again. They compare it to a nuclear bomb: We saw what it did, and the threat of it is so terrifying that everyone backs down before it's used again.

But I think a big time BCS program like Penn State would survive just fine.

SMU had 30 years of terrible football after the death penalty because of four reasons that don't affect the big boys:
-- SMU isn't a school that draws 70,000 no matter who they play.
-- SMU was a tenant at Cowboys Stadium. Their 23,783-seat on-campus "stadium" had been neglected as a venue for 40 years.
-- SMU downgraded from a prestigious conference.
-- SMU didn't get in on the TV contracts the big boys got when the NCAA ceded control to conferences and ESPN/ESPN2 led to a quadrupling of TV timeslots.

I don't think the SMU Death Penalty made the SWC break up at all. It was the TV rights that led the Big Eight to try and land the Texas market, and the selling of the SEC Championship Game that led the SEC to add Arkansas and South Carolina.

Penn State (or Ohio State, who had 52 athletes getting the Buckeye discount on cars) would survive the death penalty no problem:

When they came back, they wouldn't have to play in 25,000-seat "stadium" that had been neglected for 40 years, they'd go right back to selling 400,000 tickets a season. Right back to having the weight rooms, support staff and all the infrastructure that lets them generate $60 million a year in the first place. And right back to collecting their BCS/Big Ten Network money cause no one's gonna kick them out.

Actually, Ohio State getting the death penalty for one year would probably be the single worst thing ever to happen to the Mid-American Conference. All the kids who dream of playing for Ohio State and end up in the MAC would immediate consider going out of state and might find a school they like. And when Ohio State came back, practically the entire MAC All-Conference teams would transfer to OSU.

It would knock PSU/OSU/whomever back 7-10 years. Then they'd be right back where they started. USC lost 20 scholarships and were #5 in the country last year.
 

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Scholarship reduction does nothing and is a stupid way to punish.

It baffles me that they don't use the "No home out of conference games" penalty much. (Only Baylor men's hoops has gotten it in the last 25 years).

Docking home OOC games would hurt the school financially. PSU would lose revenue from 280,000 tickets sold. But the STUDENTS who didn't do anything wrong can still play and go to a bowl. It would also HELP financially all the small schools who play by the rules without the recruiting advantages of big schools.

You tell Penn State they have to play their scheduled games against Akron, Buffalo, Temple, UMass, Bowling Green on the ROAD (and not give back the guarantees) and every single one of those schools wouldn't sell out a home game against PSU?
 

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The penalty is understandable but I am uncomfortable with the lack of due process. Will the NCAA president now be the new Kennessaw Mountain Landis, ruling with college sports with absolute authority under a "best interest of college sports clause"?
For all intents and purposes, the Freeh Report was the result of a comprehensive investigation that was much more detailed than your average NCAA investigation. The Miami investigation is still ongoing in that regard - that's why the NCAA was able to make their ruling (which, I might add, won't be appealed by the current Penn State administration).
 

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The NCAA is sending its own message about priorities and what should have been done. They're taking the same position as most people on this matter: that it was a calculated, egregious cover-up, concerning heinous acts that should never have been allowed and were certainly allowed to go on much too long at the expense of Sandusky's many victims.

If you're wondering about how they came to the $60 million figure, it's my understanding that it equates to one year's annual revenue for the PSU athletic department.

Otherwise, the B1G also has inflicted its own monetary punishment: Penn State will not receive its B1G distributions for the duration of the bowl ban.

Between the actions taken by the NCAA and B1G, I don't see how Penn State will be in any position to field football teams that don't put to risk the players that suite up for for it from here through the ban period. As many have noted, though it would be hard on the local Happy Valley economy, a one or two year death penalty would have been less crippling than all this.
If my understanding is correct, Penn State is ineligible to receive the bowl revenue from the conference - that money will also be diverted to charities that deal with helping prevent child abuse.

I have NOT heard anything saying that they would be deprived of their share of other Big 10 revenues, most notably their share of the conference TV deal. That is revenue that they will still receive this year; keep in mind that not all of the TV network revenue is football-related.

Point #2 - they will not be booted from the conference anytime soon. The Big 10 conference is not about to jeopardize their newest cash cow that is their football championship game. They would have to have a replacement lined up, whether it's Notre Dame or Maryland or Virginia or Rutgers or whoever else.
 
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