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A local paper ran an article about how the investigation was ran last year. Students were upset that the results weren't made public and one student was quoted as saying "the firm UVM hired seems more oriented toward improving the university’s image, not its systems."


So my sentiment aligns with the above posts - it's better than nothing, but still not enough. I also do think more can be done on campus if students were really serious about effecting change. Where are the calls to sponsors asking for their thoughts?

"The ironic thing is, this social media campaign is more likely to keep Becker here than get him fired. He likely would have left on his own via another job offer but it's likely that some offers may not have happened over concerns with this issue.

So, if the end game is to get Becker removed...they are losing...badly..."

My hope is the end goal is to enact meaningful change on campus, offering more resources for survivors, UVM taking accountability for its actions (or lack thereof) so far. This issue isn't unique to just UVM, but students there are obviously more unhappy with the school's response to it. If this is just a Becker issue, then it's same problem different campus. And you can't say the student protests are responsible for him staying? It's not like they asked for this.
If the goal is to enact meaningful change on campus, which it should be, an anonymous, social media campaign is probably not going to be very effective. It's just too easy to be ignored. On the record complaints are much more difficult to sweep under the rug. Until I see some of that happening and the university not responding appropriately, I'm pretty much done with this, unfortunately...
 

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If the goal is to enact meaningful change on campus, which it should be, an anonymous, social media campaign is probably not going to be very effective. It's just too easy to be ignored. On the record complaints are much more difficult to sweep under the rug. Until I see some of that happening and the university not responding appropriately, I'm pretty much done with this, unfortunately...
If a victim feels comfortable disclosing his/her experience only through social media, then of course, he/she should do that. And again, I still think more should be done by the university. That said, you're right, it's hard to do much else with it.
 

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My key criteria was independent and credible. If the previous investigation didn't meet that standard, as perceived by most stakeholders, it failed. Also, institutional action/change must be a result of the findings.
Here are some facts: Sexual Misconduct action plan

This seems pretty independent and credible to me. It also seems like some pretty important improvements in the athletic department, but I guess that's just me...
 

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Here are some facts: Sexual Misconduct action plan

This seems pretty independent and credible to me. It also seems like some pretty important improvements in the athletic department, but I guess that's just me...
Sorry I don't have time to search for the article now but I remember there was one detailing students' complaints how this seemed largely performative
 

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Sorry I don't have time to search for the article now but I remember there was one detailing students' complaints how this seemed largely performative
Yeah, like I said, its not that the university has done nothing (which seems to be the prevailing false narrative), its that some people feel that it is not enough...
 

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Yeah, like I said, its not that the university has done nothing (which seems to be the prevailing narrative), its that some people feel that it is not enough...
My guess is that is because the people that seemed to perpetuate the culture and who appeared to try and sweep it under the rug are still there in their positions of authority. I don't know that for sure, but that would be my assumption.
 
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I generally agree with the sentiment, however it appears to be that UVM and the State of Vermont had a long time to conduct independent investigations and report out publicly on finding and actions. Where is that response?

The failure of leadership to adequately respond is certainly leading to continued social media discourse. This is not going to end well.

What is the State Legislature or Governor doing? Credible accusations for years have been ignored and victims deserve justice. The institution also needs to have credibility and accountability in response to this. I can't believe anyone in Vermont thought this was just going to go away without a complete investigation and full response by independent authorities.

How can we hold student-athletes accountable for their actions, while administrators and politicians aren't held accountable themselves? Do their job and accept the results!
UVM is not a true public university the way the Vermont State College system (Lyndon, VTC, Castleton, etc) are (or most state universities, including UMass and UMaine) in that it's not run by the State of Vermont. In many ways it is more similar from a corporate governance/ownership standpoint to Cornell (private albeit still a land-grant university) with a Board of Trustees that calls all the shots than it is to say UMass. Professors, coaches, etc at Castelon State are state employees; UVM employees--including Coach Becker and Schulman are not state employees.

That is all to say that the Governor and State Legislature have no real oversight here--nor should they. Unless of course it becomes a criminal matter which would roll under the Chittenden County State's Attorney's Office. And in that case I doubt it would become "political" and more similar to any number of sexual assault cases. Now, if you want to form conspiracy theories: I believe Skylar Nash has/is worked/working in the County's State's Attorney's Office.

The most recent allegation is a symptom of the party school culture at UVM that has normalized sexual assault for decades more than anything specific to the basketball team. It seems as the administration has long condoned the party school image (and party school behavior) because frankly that reputation helps bring wealthy upper middle-class kids from Westchester County and NJ (you know, the kids who go to QU). There is a lot I'm sure the administration will say when pressed ("We enforce a completely dry campus!" etc), but I'm sure there's a lot more room to hold students accountable for activities they do off-campus.

This culture of binge drinking/partying then goes right into normalizing sexual assault and, at minimum, very unwated advances (probably similar to "ZooMass" back in the day but at least reputationally it does seem the UMass administration has cleaned that up a bit). Young women should have the liberty to enjoy themselves at night without having to constantly fear they will be taken advantage by horny predators. I'll die on the hill that firing Becker (which it does seem its the main priority of that IG account and all the "Fire Becker" signs; anecdotally I see a lot more "Fire Becker" signs than "Fire Schulman" signs) along with the very blatant attempt of making Brett Kavanaughs out of every UVM basketball player is not going to bring any meaningful change to this longstanding systemic problem.
 

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UVM didn't "sweep it under the rug." They are obligated to not make these complaints public if the complainer demands anonymity. If they had done anything different they would have been criminally liable.

This is very similar to medicine. If your doctor determines you have a disease they can't even tell your spouse without your permission.

Those who are criticizing UVM are in fact demanding that UVM break the law.
 

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UVM didn't "sweep it under the rug." They are obligated to not make these complaints public if the complainer demands anonymity. If they had done anything different they would have been criminally liable.

This is very similar to medicine. If your doctor determines you have a disease they can't even tell your spouse without your permission.

Those who are criticizing UVM are in fact demanding that UVM break to law.
I said "appeared to try and sweep it under the rug". With the actions of the athletic administration trying to make the victim go the path of least resistance would lead some to believe that was what the school was attempting to do. I'm merely saying that would be my assumption as to why there are people out there that felt the school hasn't done enough.
 

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VCat_2015 - That probably sums it up well. I was wrongly under the impression the bureaucratic setup was similar to "most" State universities - thanks for the clarification. Bottom line, you're right that this does seem to be a "culture" issue that the Administration need to fix.
 

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And I'm merely saying that UVM's hands are completely tied without permission to do more from the person who lodged the complaint. UVM did not force anyone to follow any path. When the complaint was first lodged, UVM asked whether there was going to be a following legal complaint. If the answer had been yes, the school would have been obligated to remove itself from any investigation or further activity regarding the situation, so the answer to that question was primary.

All they did was what the school could legally do, which is very encumbered and limited.
 

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And I'm merely saying that UVM's hands are completely tied without permission to do more from the person who lodged the complaint. UVM did not force anyone to follow any path. When the complaint was first lodged, UVM asked whether there was going to be a following legal complaint. If the answer had been yes, the school would have been obligated to remove itself from any investigation or further activity regarding the situation, so the answer to that question was primary.

All they did was what the school could legally do, which is very encumbered and limited.
I think we're talking about two different things here - UVM had an audit of their AAEO office, not of any specific case. You can see the article I linked in an earlier post. They could've released the results of this without sharing any personal information
 

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Thanks for this historical perspective. Keep ‘em coming…🤓
It's really funny how you immediately respond to anything in this post to defend the team/your stance any time something new is posted because it impacts you so personally, and how you also don't understand bot posts (which this clearly is) here and reply to them across the board on here.
 

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UVM is not a true public university the way the Vermont State College system (Lyndon, VTC, Castleton, etc) are (or most state universities, including UMass and UMaine) in that it's not run by the State of Vermont. In many ways it is more similar from a corporate governance/ownership standpoint to Cornell (private albeit still a land-grant university) with a Board of Trustees that calls all the shots than it is to say UMass. Professors, coaches, etc at Castelon State are state employees; UVM employees--including Coach Becker and Schulman are not state employees.

That is all to say that the Governor and State Legislature have no real oversight here--nor should they. Unless of course it becomes a criminal matter which would roll under the Chittenden County State's Attorney's Office. And in that case I doubt it would become "political" and more similar to any number of sexual assault cases. Now, if you want to form conspiracy theories: I believe Skylar Nash has/is worked/working in the County's State's Attorney's Office.

The most recent allegation is a symptom of the party school culture at UVM that has normalized sexual assault for decades more than anything specific to the basketball team. It seems as the administration has long condoned the party school image (and party school behavior) because frankly that reputation helps bring wealthy upper middle-class kids from Westchester County and NJ (you know, the kids who go to QU). There is a lot I'm sure the administration will say when pressed ("We enforce a completely dry campus!" etc), but I'm sure there's a lot more room to hold students accountable for activities they do off-campus.

This culture of binge drinking/partying then goes right into normalizing sexual assault and, at minimum, very unwated advances (probably similar to "ZooMass" back in the day but at least reputationally it does seem the UMass administration has cleaned that up a bit). Young women should have the liberty to enjoy themselves at night without having to constantly fear they will be taken advantage by horny predators. I'll die on the hill that firing Becker (which it does seem its the main priority of that IG account and all the "Fire Becker" signs; anecdotally I see a lot more "Fire Becker" signs than "Fire Schulman" signs) along with the very blatant attempt of making Brett Kavanaughs out of every UVM basketball player is not going to bring any meaningful change to this longstanding systemic problem.
I don't see it this way. Of the 25 UVM trustees, thirteen (9) are elected by the legislature, three (3) are appointed the governor, one (1) is the governor him/herself, nine (9) are "self perpetuating", two (2) are students who I don't think are selected by the student body, and one (1) is the UVM President. The Vermont legislature and the Vermont Governor are in firm control of UVM. The power is not proportional to funding, that's for sure. In my view, a dumb set up.
 
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