Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

1601 - 1620 of 1649 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,359 Posts
I dont dislike football. Its my favorite sport after college basketball. What I dont like is chasing FBS football when you aren't P5. Its a lose lose proposition. I have no problem with dual membership and if there was a team out there looking to go A10 in basketball and pursue football that wouldn't matter to me. I would purely judge them based on what they bring to the table BB-wise.

We're too big already. You'd better be a compelling addition to the A10 at this point football or not if you want to enter this conference. So tell me, does ODU offer us anything, current state, no one leaves? Not really. And neither does Belmont. Without teams leaving, no one.. right now.. is an addition worth taking on.

I do think football skews a lot. The AAC is fooling themselves. They're CUSA 2.0. Sadly nobody cares about them. Football or basketball. They want to be P5 football they're not. They want to be Big East basketball they're not. Theyd be better off de-emphasizing football and focusing on basketball. Temple, USF, UCF, Houston, Tulsa, etc. UMass too. You guys should embrace A10 basketball and try to recapture Cal days. No reason you can't. Football is a drain on resources unless you're a "have". So if UMass, Charlotte, ODU, et. al. are not getting into the P5 - you aren't - then allocate resources where they belong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,752 Posts
The only reason to add ODU and these other losers is if you want to split units even further because that's what they want. They don't give a single solitary shit about basketball.

I'll draw the line in the sand since I'm militant about this. If a school sponsors FBS football, I don't want them in the Atlantic 10.
 

·
Registered
St. Bonaventure
Joined
·
6,682 Posts
The only reason to add ODU and these other losers is if you want to split units even further because that's what they want. They don't give a single solitary shit about basketball.

I'll draw the line in the sand since I'm militant about this. If a school sponsors FBS football, I don't want them in the Atlantic 10.
BLAU BLAU BLAU! Same here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,594 Posts
I can both love college football and hate what college football in today's NCAA is. The cartel has ruined everything. College sports were better when the schools good at football/basketball were spread out over 9 football and 20 basketball conferences.

The reason we're all "We want no part of FBS programs" is because you can't serve two masters. There's only X dollars at a non-BCS athletics department, and the cost of being committed to high quality basketball (our identity!) is not easily met when you're devoting resources to football.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,023 Posts
The only reason to add anybody is a program as LaSalle university can no longer maintain enough sports to be Div 1, never mind the viability of LaSalle University is in question. Where is exployer_steve to shed any insight to LaSalle's situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
The only reason to add anybody is a program as LaSalle university can no longer maintain enough sports to be Div 1, never mind the viability of LaSalle University is in question. Where is exployer_steve to shed any insight to LaSalle's situation.
Who the fuck made you the arbiter of who comes or goes in this league? Your school with millions more in resources has done less with more over the last decade plus. Hell, you've been pretty god damn irrelevant since the cheater was the coach. La Salle's doing fine, thank you very much. Go back to your dreams of UMass football fanboy fantasies and piss off.
 

·
Registered
St. Bonaventure
Joined
·
6,682 Posts
Who the fuck made you the arbiter of who comes or goes in this league? Your school with millions more in resources has done less with more over the last decade plus. Hell, you've been pretty god damn irrelevant since the cheater was the coach. La Salle's doing fine, thank you very much. Go back to your dreams of UMass football fanboy fantasies and piss off.
Shots fired!

Argument aside, is there any word on that proposed court-flipping renovation of Gola? I had seen the mock-ups a year or so ago, and that improvement alone would go a long way in the perception of the Explorers. There’s something about zero baseline seats that rakes nerves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
Shots fired!

Argument aside, is there any word on that proposed court-flipping renovation of Gola? I had seen the mock-ups a year or so ago, and that improvement alone would go a long way in the perception of the Explorers. There’s something about zero baseline seats that rakes nerves.
I haven't heard anything lately Bill. The Prez is leaving for Xavier (gag) so I'm sure that'll set things back. Maybe if we could siphon off a few mill. from the moribund UMess football program we could get 'er done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,594 Posts
It really doesn't matter what we say here has it's just a group of Bonnie fans, a few Dayton and UMass and a St Joes fan that post here. Perhaps the board should be renamed BonaWagonII and others board. 😁
Well, that's really more of an indictment on your fan base than the board. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,892 Posts
Look, we can all agree that everyone should ETORA.
I hope that R is for "respective". Otherwise, I'm going to show my ass (no pun originally intended) and be ridiculed here. Perhaps not a fate worse than death, but something I would not wish on any of you assholes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,752 Posts
I hope that R is for "respective". Otherwise, I'm going to show my ass (no pun originally intended) and be ridiculed here. Perhaps not a fate worse than death, but something I would not wish on any of you assholes.
Ever perceptive, you are right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
I haven't heard anything lately Bill. The Prez is leaving for Xavier (gag) so I'm sure that'll set things back. Maybe if we could siphon off a few mill. from the moribund UMess football program we could get 'er done.
So is the LaSalle “Prez” leaving for Xavier a good thing for LaSalle and a bad thing for Xavier? Is that truly “setting things back”?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,594 Posts
The only reason to add anybody is a program as LaSalle university can no longer maintain enough sports to be Div 1, never mind the viability of LaSalle University is in question. Where is exployer_steve to shed any insight to LaSalle's situation.
La Salle isn't going anywhere. La Salle loses money on DI athletics? Big deal, almost everyone outside the BCS does. Most athletics departments are subsidized up the ass and still lose money. This is non-profit. You spend what you bring in anyway. Schools are cool with subsidies because Athletics is part of the advertising/marketing budget of a school. A national TV ad would cost you X dollars; But LaSalle can get a 2-hour spot on ESPN Friday night AND have ESPN pay THEM for it. Even if LaSalle doesn't get the A-10 ESPN games because they kinda suck in our league, there's a chance they get one if they're in the A-10, and like, 1/35th of that chance in the MAAC and like zero if they're in Division 3.

The idea of someone dropping down to a lesser conference because they just can't compete is so crazy that I legit can't think of any that didn't have massive other factors involved as well. Like, Georgia Tech and Tulane left the SEC in the mid-60s, but that was philosophical disagreement on rule changes back in the wild west days of recruiting. Northwestern didn't made the NCAA Tournament in MBB until the 78th tourney. Vanderbilt STILL has zero SEC football championships (Ga Tech has 5, Tulane has 3... and they left almost 60 years ago!). Those guys ain't leaving the Big Ten/SEC.

You don't voluntarily "drop down" unless you're in a league that changes SO DRASTICALLY that it makes no sense for you to be in a group with those teams. The A-10 has changed drastically over the years, but "to Dayton in the West, to Virginia Tech in the south" and now it's got Saint Louis and Davidson beyond that is not much of a change. The philosophy is the same. Saint Louis and Charlotte left C-USA for the A-10 because they joined 9 other teams, zero teams west of New Orleans, for a basketball conference that had football; and then it became 5 members west of New Orleans, football-focused league. That's drastic.

And the only way the A-10 no longer makes sense for La Salle is if they're dropping athletics entirely. The financials of the A-10 are the best deal they're going to get having athletics. Are they going to sell more tickets to games against lesser competition? No. Someone will be like "but the travel expenses of the A-10" as if flying to Dayton and Saint Louis, staying in a hotel and buying food is a different price than flying to Buffalo to play Niagara and Canisius. It's the number of flights, not the distance away that determines price.

The MAAC would be cheaper travel expenses for La Salle, but not enough savings to offset the loss of TV revenue and ticket sales. LaSalle's cut of NCAA loot would go from 0.077 shares to 0.083 per year. "Oh, but we'd be better competitively in the MAAC!" What does that get you? If you go to the dance in the MAAC, pull an upset and get national attention, it helps your cause. But you're sacrificing NBCSN and CBSSN time every year to try and get more CBS time every 6 years? What's the best case scenario for La Salle in the MAAC? They become the Gonzaga of the league and... get invited to the Atlantic 10?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,594 Posts
Remember the "A-10 standings since 2014" discussion a month ago? Let me post that again up to the minute, and also list the number of sports sponsored by each athletic department:

98-35 Dayton (17)
93-41 VCU (17)

75-41 Davidson (21)
86-49 St. Bonaventure (17)
83-54 Rhode Island (20)
73-57 Richmond (17)
61-68 Saint Louis (18)


61-68 George Washington (27)
53-80 Saint Joseph's (20)
54-83 Duquesne (17)
53-79 Massachusetts (21)
53-83 George Mason (22)
54-83 La Salle (25)
32-105 Fordham (23)

Top 7: 18.1 sports average (5 of the top 7 have 17 or 18 sports)
Bot 7: 22.1 sports average (6 of the bottom 7 have 20+ sports).

What does that tell you about resources? That's why LaSalle is dropping softball, baseball, M/W tennis, volleyball, M swimming, M water polo after this year. That will take them down to 18. And probably should be enough to bring their A-10 athletics department into a manageable situation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
Remember the "A-10 standings since 2014" discussion a month ago? Let me post that again up to the minute, and also list the number of sports sponsored by each athletic department:

98-35 Dayton (17)
93-41 VCU (17)

75-41 Davidson (21)
86-49 St. Bonaventure (17)
83-54 Rhode Island (20)
73-57 Richmond (17)
61-68 Saint Louis (18)


61-68 George Washington (27)
53-80 Saint Joseph's (20)
54-83 Duquesne (17)
53-79 Massachusetts (21)
53-83 George Mason (22)
54-83 La Salle (25)
32-105 Fordham (23)

Top 7: 18.1 sports average (5 of the top 7 have 17 or 18 sports)
Bot 7: 22.1 sports average (6 of the bottom 7 have 20+ sports).

What does that tell you about resources? That's why LaSalle is dropping softball, baseball, M/W tennis, volleyball, M swimming, M water polo after this year. That will take them down to 18. And probably should be enough to bring their A-10 athletics department into a manageable situation
I’m not sure I agree here JP.

Dayton and VCU, the top 2, actually have 15 and 14 sports respectively, and both spend about $32 million on athletics. It is my understanding that all sports at UD excluding football are fully funded. I don’t know about VCU but suspect they are as well. Men’s Basketball makes up around 25% of both school’s athletic expenditures.

LaSalle with more sports spends $14.6 on athletics.

FU has the highest expenditures at $35 million. Now this includes a chunk for football and significantly higher cost of scholarships than UD and VCU, but FU is spending more on athletics than most A10 schools.

The Bonnie’s at number 4 spend about the same amount on athletics as LaSalle. Davidson at number 3 spends around $17 million. Both schools with the smallest enrollments and budgets have figured out how to win

LaSalle isn’t going to spend more money on Men’s Basketball - they are going to spend less on athletics as a whole. I suspect that someone figured out the cost of carrying these sports outweighs any bump in tuition that the athletes may contribute to the school. Fitch downgraded Lasalle’s bond rating below investment grade last fall in part because of COVID but also on trends targeted before COVID. The school needs to spend less on athletics. I don’t care how much they spend if their Men’s Basketball team wins.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,594 Posts
Dayton and VCU, the top 2, actually have 15 and 14 sports respectively, and both spend about $32 million on athletics. It is my understanding that all sports at UD excluding football are fully funded. I don’t know about VCU but suspect they are as well. Men’s Basketball makes up around 25% of both school’s athletic expenditures.

LaSalle with more sports spends $14.6 on athletics.

FU has the highest expenditures at $35 million. Now this includes a chunk for football and significantly higher cost of scholarships than UD and VCU, but FU is spending more on athletics than most A10 schools.

The Bonnie’s at number 4 spend about the same amount on athletics as LaSalle.
Couple points. I don't think we're "arguing."

I think our different sport numbers are "Track" as Indoor Track and Outdoor Track count as 2 sports (per gender), even though it's the same athletes. (Beach Volleyball is similar, it's just your indoor volleyball team playing in the spring).

I'm not saying that budgets are divided evenly and therefore, less sports = more basketball spending. They're obviously not evenly divided. But there's other aspects of college athletics that simply make things better for everyone left when you have fewer sports. If your media and marketing staffs are too busy running game ops for 24 teams, they're doing less things their skill sets would help the programs with: Image-related items that lure recruits, ticket sales and boosters. The IMAGE of your program is massive in college sports. When a support crew is staff well and can excel at their jobs, and people think "That school gets it" then you're far better off (even if behind the scenes is a shitshow of misleadership) than if you're a great organization of great, smart people that's simply stretched a little thin. It sounds silly, but it's huge.

It's like a restaurant. Ever notice that when you can't get seem to find a waiter, the food usually sucks to? Chances are if there's not enough waiters in the place, there's not enough cooks either, so they're just trying to crank shit out instead of make you something tasty. They're drowning. Just trying to get through the day instead of putting their skills to work.

"Fully funded" is a misleading term. That is "using the max amount of NCAA scholarships for that sport." Just because you have max scholarships doesn't mean you're actually funding a PROGRAM. I can tell you for a fact that if every UD program is "fully funded" they still aren't funding EACH TEAM what they need to win an A-10 championship or even compete for one. For some sports, it's "Get good kids, graduate your kids, don't embarrass the school, don't always finish last, make the top half or top quarter of the A-10 every once in a while... and you can stay head coach for as long as you like."

Bonas is the same. The men's soccer team has had 10 winning seasons in 60 years, and only 7 head coaches. How do you suck that bad and get to keep your job? Because the department doesn't EXPECT you to win.

Don't get me started on the whole Cost of Admission expense to college athletics. That's just SO DUMB. "It costs the athletics department $70,000 per scholarship at Fordham and only $42,000 at Bonaventure!" No. Both schools -- every school -- is stupid. The cost to put a scholarship athlete into school is the cost of a chair. Why is this actual money Athletics has to come up with? I have no idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,023 Posts
LaSalle with more sports spends $14.6 on athletics.

LaSalle isn’t going to spend more money on Men’s Basketball - they are going to spend less on athletics as a whole. I suspect that someone figured out the cost of carrying these sports outweighs any bump in tuition that the athletes may contribute to the school. Fitch downgraded Lasalle’s bond rating below investment grade last fall in part because of COVID but also on trends targeted before COVID. The school needs to spend less on athletics. I don’t care how much they spend if their Men’s Basketball team wins.

Nice post JAF_1962. Our media contract was extended for 3 years for a reason. Don't think LaSalle will be around for the next media contract.
From fitch rating that JAF_1962 mentioned.
Fitch Ratings - Chicago - 28 Sep 2020: Fitch Ratings has downgraded La Salle University's Issuer Default Rating (IDR) to 'BB+' from 'BBB-' and has downgraded the ratings on the following bonds issued on behalf of La Salle University (La Salle):

--$40,050,000 Philadelphia Industrial Development Authority, La Salle University Revenue Bonds series 2017 to 'BB+' from 'BBB-';
--$84,300,000 million Pennsylvania Higher Educational Facilities Authority, La Salle University Revenue Bonds series 2012 to 'BB+' from 'BBB-'.

The Rating Outlook has been revised to Stable from Negative.


SECURITY

Revenue bonds are an unsecured, general obligation of the university.


ANALYTICAL CONCLUSION

The downgrade of the IDR and bond ratings to 'BB+' reflect continued pressure on La Salle's enrollment, which has been further exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, competitive operating landscape, and reliance on an unsustainable level of endowment support in the intermediate term, as strategic efforts to reinforce student demand and outcomes are implemented. The Outlook revision to Stable from Negative reflects the limited financial flexibility afforded by La Salle's $80 million endowment and $75 million in available funds, which provide some necessary cushion as the university navigates through near-term pandemic challenges and executes on key strategic initiatives around enrollment, student outcomes, and program refinement.

Coronavirus Impacts

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic and related government-led containment measures create an uncertain environment for the U.S. public finance higher education sector. Fitch's forward-looking analysis is informed by management's expectations coupled with Fitch's common set of baseline and downside macroeconomic scenarios. Fitch's scenarios will evolve as needed during this dynamic period. Fitch's current baseline scenario includes a sharp economic contraction in 2Q20, with an initial bounce in 3Q20 followed by a slower recovery trajectory from 4Q20. For the higher education sector, the baseline case assumes the closure of most residential campuses for a three- to four-month period with continued sporadic closures possible thereafter. Rating sensitivities address potential rating implications under a downside scenario, which assumes slower economic recovery and prolonged or recurring disruptions related to the coronavirus into fiscal 2021, including enrollment and related revenue pressures for higher education.
La Salle shifted to remote learning in March 2020 and received just under $4.3 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act proceeds, of which half was available to help offset institutional impacts including housing and dining refunds. Fall 2020 is currently underway in a fully remote model.


Revenue Defensibility: 'bbb'

Competitive Pressures on Enrollment, Elevated Endowment Support



La Salle's 'bbb' revenue defensibility is supported by moderate demand indicators which reflect its regional draw and somewhat self-selective student population. With a major tuition reset in 2017, Fitch believes La Salle retains some pricing power with a relatively lower cost of attendance than area peers. However, the assessment is particularly vulnerable in the context of steady declines in enrollment and total revenue, and the need for elevated endowment support in recent years. With its relatively tuition dependent revenue base, La Salle has elected to utilize a supplemental endowment draw to offset student revenue pressures at levels which are not sustainable.


Operating Risk: 'bbb'

Somewhat variable - though sufficient - cash flow.



Inclusive of its supplemental endowment draw, La Salle has generated operating cash flow margins around 11% which are consistent with a higher assessment. However, recognition of a relatively high average age of plant indicative of some future capital needs, as well as an expectation of a return to standard endowment support, are better reflected in the 'bbb' assessment.


Financial Profile: 'bb'

Sufficient available funds provide margin of flexibility



The 'bb' financial profile assessment reflects the pressure on La Salle's operating and leverage profile through an expected period of continued enrollment and revenue pressure. Absent expected improvements in enrollment and operating performance, La Salle remains susceptible to further deterioration in available funds over the intermediate term.


ASYMMETRIC ADDITIONAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS

Fitch's assessment includes no asymmetric additional risk considerations.


RATING SENSITIVITIES

Factors that could, individually or collectively, lead to positive rating action/upgrade:
--Recovery in enrollment and solid retention beyond fall 2020, leading to steady to improving net tuition revenue via sustainable discount levels.
--Maintenance of sound operating cash flow levels in the context of a stable to growing revenue base and reduced reliance on endowment support to sustainable levels nearer a 5% spend rate.

Factors that could, individually or collectively, lead to negative rating action/downgrade:
--Continued enrollment pressure in fall 2021, particularly which pressures net tuition and student fee revenue;
--Erosion in operating performance which persists beyond fiscal 2021, particularly at levels requiring ongoing extraordinary and unsustainable endowment support;
--Unfavorable shift in leverage (as measured by AF/adjusted debt) either from additional debt or erosion in liquidity, to levels persisting below 45%-50%.


BEST/WORST CASE RATING SCENARIO

International scale credit ratings of Sovereigns, Public Finance and Infrastructure issuers have a best-case rating upgrade scenario (defined as the 99th percentile of rating transitions, measured in a positive direction) of three notches over a three-year rating horizon; and a worst-case rating downgrade scenario (defined as the 99th percentile of rating transitions, measured in a negative direction) of three notches over three years. The complete span of best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings for all rating categories ranges from 'AAA' to 'D'. Best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings are based on historical performance. For more information about the methodology used to determine sector-specific best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings, visit [https://www.fitchratings.com/site/re/10111579].


CREDIT PROFILE

La Salle University, founded in 1863 by the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, is located on a 133-acre campus 10 miles north of Center City Philadelphia. In addition to its main campus, the university has a campus in Plymouth Meeting, PA (Montgomery County), which opened in 2008. La Salle is comprised of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Business, and Nursing and Health Sciences. La Salle is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. Total headcount enrollment in fall 2019 was 4,933.


REVENUE DEFENSIBILITY

La Salle's 'bbb' revenue defensibility is supported by primarily moderate demand indicators and is constrained by unfavorable enrollment trends which have underperformed following the schools' fall 2017 tuition reset. An elevated endowment draw has been utilized over the prior three years to support operations, as expenses are contained and strategy and leadership in La Salle's student recruitment and retention areas are adjusted. Enrollment is expected to decline again in fall 2020 following the university's pivot to remote learning in August, though Fitch notes that steady student quality, stable application levels, and improved retention in fall 2020 support an expectation that demand may recover over a longer period beyond the current pandemic environment. Several key initiatives around student recruitment, retention, persistence, and post-graduate success may support incremental enrollment growth in La Salle's otherwise competitive northeast market.

La Salle's student base is predominately undergraduate, and its persistently low acceptance and matriculation levels (near 75% and 15%, respectively, for incoming freshman) are indicative of the competitive landscape in Philadelphia and the wider northeast region. La Salle is refocusing its strategy and leadership and enrollment and retention management efforts; of which the latter has showed early promise in fall 2020 following a weaker than expected yield in fall 2019. In addition, La Salle continues to focus on strategic program delivery, which has included adding targeted programs and scaling back on certain graduate programs over the past several years. New leadership in key student-facing roles will be integral as La Salle executes on its strategy.

...
OPERATING RISK

La Salle's operating performance was steady in fiscal 2020, although weaker than expected following a thinner 2019 that included about $2 million in nonrecurring expenses. While cash flow (11% margin in 2020) alone would indicate a stronger assessment, the 'bbb' operating risk assessment reflects that La Salle's cash flow is benefiting from elevated endowment support, and its level of constrained capital spending planned over the near term against its relatively high average age of plant that is indicative of increasing capital needs over the longer term.

La Salle has a solid track record of managing its expense base in line with its revenues over time, particularly through its tuition reset in fall 2017 (fiscal 2018). Fiscal 2020 revenues were lighter than anticipated due in part to the impacts from the pandemic, though interest expense will decline once a $6.7 million variable rate loan fully matures in fiscal 2021. The pandemic is expected to significantly impact fiscal 2021 results, which management reports will be offset via sizeable expense reductions (including a reduction in force) and other margin preservation efforts.
LaSalle may need to further reduce athletics to preserve their financial health and hence the speculation they may need to leave the A10 and reduce coaching salaries as well.

Here is the full Fitch downgrade rating of LaSalle.
https://www.fitchratings.com/resear...vs-to-bb-outlook-revised-to-stable-28-09-2020
 
1601 - 1620 of 1649 Posts
Top