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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Daily News: Net bench takes backseat

"Our bench last year was much better," said Scott, whose team had yesterday off and plays host to Indiana tonight. "And basically it's the same guys."

. . . . .

"It seems like every day it's a new guy or someone in there," Harris said. "I would say as far as the substitution (pattern) . . . last year we had a consistent rotation where you knew exactly when you are going in and what players are going in and playing on a consistent basis with that person. This year it has been kind of different.

"It messes it up a little bit," Harris continued. "One little wrinkle with this offense and you can look terrible out there. You've got to find the right combination, stay with it and be consistent."

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"With this offense, one guy can mess up the whole play," Harris said of the danger of playing so many different reserves. "That is the complexity of this offense. It is not a normal setting. If you got one or two guys not running the right route, you can mess it all up."

Harris later said that he and "everybody" else needed to play better. "There is no flow," he said.
 

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That makes me think that it will be harder for Griffin to play a significant roll than if the Nets ran standard NBA sets. In the pregame last night, Byron said that the reason he's waiting until Tuesday to play Griffin, is because he wants to see him run the offense in practice with a defense present. To this point, he has only run it 5 on 0. If the Nets ran a different offense, would we have seen Griffin already?

When Mourning was here, they went to standard sets a lot when Zo was in the game. If the motion offense is so dependent on perfect execution, why don't they mix in standard sets more often? Is it becuase of a lack of creative talent?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
For a while there, the Nets WERE mixing it up, running NBA sets, going into the post more, and adding quick-hitter wrinkles to the motion offense that allowed players to work in smaller spaces and from different angles. I especially liked the screens and rub-offs they were setting up in the low blocks in order to free up cracks of space for RJ and K-Mart to explode to the basket.

I don't know what's happened since then. Maybe all the new stuff fell flat and the team got back to what it knows. In the loss to the Heat, it looked like the Nets literally ran the same plays for 3-5 consecutive possessions, maybe more - and they didn't even run them well. The team looked confused and out of sync.

The Griffin situation is one reason why I posted the thing about the bench. The way the team is run right now, as described by Harris, a fix can't be as simple as plugging in Griffin and Davis. It won't matter how good they are if the team isn't on the same page.

It's worrisome that the system has apparently become so stiff, the offense is at any time a hair away from paralysis. The solution involves play-makers, creators, more than it does finishers. I keep coming back to him, but it's a main reason why I say so much about Scalabrine manning the pivot. To inject Kings-esque flexibility into the offense, the Nets need a play-maker in the interior - a standard-issue motion offense pivot - to work with Kidd's perimeter play-making. With Veal inside and Kidd outside, Scott can then plug in finishers, like Griffin, A-Train, RJ and K-Mart, around them in a flexible, responsive offense.
 
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