Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Volleyball Coach
Joined
·
24,902 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Shabazz Muhammad is a 6'5" 220 pound freshman wing for UCLA. He turned 19 in November. He has been measured with a 6'11.25" wingspan and a 8'8" standing reach. Muhammad was the top ranked player in his high school class and appears to be on his way to be the #1 pick in the draft.

Draft Express Profile

Despite all of the offcourt drama surrounding him, Muhammad is averaging 18 PPG playing for Ben Howland. (For reference, Howland's offense held Kevin Love to 17.5 PPG, Russel Westbrook to 12.7 PPG, and Jrue Holiday to 8.5 PPG) He has a versatile offensive game and is shooting over 47% from both the field and three point range.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
51,478 Posts

:nonono:
 

·
Have a GREAT day!
Joined
·
13,796 Posts
Im watching the replay of the game now. He's really good, but I really don't like to see those antics after his team won the game. Thats not good for a locker room. He was doing everything for his team in the first half so I can see how he would want the ball. No excuse for not celebrating with the team.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
I'd like to see more out of him at times, but the kid is very talented. Should definitely be a Top 3 pick, has good size, and is well rounded offensively. If he continues to get better he definitely does have a little James Harden in him.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
51,478 Posts
Not a fan of Shabazz he is a good rebounder and a good spot up shooter but he has poor handles, rarely looks to pass, and has had a harder time scoring in the paint then I thought he would. Based on what he has done this season I don't think he is a top 5 pick but I can see a NBA team talk themselves into taking him that high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,279 Posts
I don't care for him either. He doesn't shoot well enough from mid-range to justify his ability to create his own shot. In the NBA he's a liability at this point in his career.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
Not a fan of Shabazz he is a good rebounder and a good spot up shooter but he has poor handles, rarely looks to pass, and has had a harder time scoring in the paint then I thought he would. Based on what he has done this season I don't think he is a top 5 pick but I can see a NBA team talk themselves into taking him that high.
I don't think it will take a lot of work for one of the top 3 teams to talk themselves into Muhammad. And that's more a commentary on the lack of premier talent in this pool. He could be more than an impact roleplayer, so one of them will roll the dice. If this were 2014, for example, the talk would be whether or not someone in the 5-10 range should take a shot on him (based on this year's performance).

He reminds me a little of a crack whore's Paul Pierce, and if I had someone like Pierce to sit on him I'd feel better about drafting him. This year I do feel a little sorry for the teams "winning" Noel and Muhammad.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
67,769 Posts
This year I do feel a little sorry for the teams "winning" Noel and Muhammad.
This is very true. The last time this happened (with Kenyon and Stromile) as the top 2 picks, Mike Miller wound up rookie of the year and Jamal Crawford (a great 3rd guard) wound up the best player in the entire lottery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
I think McLemore is legit. He looks like an all-star in the Ray Allen mode to my eyes. Has some of the same weaknesses too. So #1 is something to be happy with. Two through five? Ugh. Just ugh. I liked Marcus Smart when I thought he might slip into the middle of the first round and Boston still looked like a borderline playoff team. But at four or five? Blech.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,652 Posts
I think McLemore is legit. He looks like an all-star in the Ray Allen mode to my eyes. Has some of the same weaknesses too. So #1 is something to be happy with. Two through five? Ugh. Just ugh. I liked Marcus Smart when I thought he might slip into the middle of the first round and Boston still looked like a borderline playoff team. But at four or five? Blech.
I agree, McLemore passes the eye test. You can just tell that he has got an incredible feel and natural talent for the game, he looks so smooth on the court. Even in the NBA you rarely see that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
I think McLemore is legit. He looks like an all-star in the Ray Allen mode to my eyes. Has some of the same weaknesses too. So #1 is something to be happy with. Two through five? Ugh. Just ugh. I liked Marcus Smart when I thought he might slip into the middle of the first round and Boston still looked like a borderline playoff team. But at four or five? Blech.
I'd be happy to land McLemore and I would be happy to land Noel too.

That doesn't mean the rest of the guys are garbage, but it's just not clear cut.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
I'm not saying they're garbage. What I'm saying is that when you win the lottery (as in land a top 3 pick) your hope is that you're getting an all star. Not landing the next DeMar DeRozan or Larry Sanders.
No doubt, but that's the nature of the beast. Sometimes drafts just aren't built that way. Even with that being said, I don't think it's a forgone conclusion that none of these guys can be big time NBA players. There won't be a LeBron, or even a Kyrie Irving, but if Noel develops into a Serge Ibaka caliber player (because if Larry Sanders didn't foul out in 27 minutes, his per 36 are very impressive) you still got a huge upgrade through the draft. If Carter-Williams can have a Ricky Rubio like impact right out of the gates, that's a big deal. There should also be a handful of international players who could easily add some quality to this draft (Dario Saric!), though to your point, none of them are top 5 guys here.

I think when we look back at this draft it will be a deep one with a handful of quality players. It's going to depend on how many guys are able to continue to improve, and Shabazz is one of them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,652 Posts
The draft in 2000 was an outlier, usually you have at least one or two players that will end up in the All-Star game at some point. If you are picking in the Top 3-5, your expectation better be to get more than a solid role player. Otherwise you are stuck with developing (very) young players that need a couple of years to reach their ceiling of a decent role player. In the mean time, they aren't helping you win games despite the investment of time, minutes and money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
The money investment is hardly an issue croco, rookie scale contracts tend to create major value. I mean would you rather have Travis Outlaw for 7 million per or have Victor Oladipo for 2.5 million?

I mean what is your definition here of a solid roleplayer? Give me a few examples, I'm a little curious.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,652 Posts
It's still an investment despite the rookie wage scale. If you are drafting a young player, you are not likely to give up on him after a year and he takes up a valuable roster spot. What is the point of selecting someone high in the draft, developing him for a couple of years when eventually you find out that his ceiling was no more than average all along? There is always a risk involved. They might be forced into a bigger role than they can handle, both from a standpoint of expectations and their actual abilities at this particular point and in the future. Sometimes it just doesn't work out and it can be difficult to blame teams because the reality is that most of the players in the NBA are around average in terms of their overall value.

I like PER as a statistical indicator for offensive production, much harder to measure the defensive impact of a player. So, to come back to your question, guys like Luol Deng, Omer Asik, O.J. Mayo or Jared Dudley to name just a few.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
Are you saying that drafting Loul Deng Top 5 in the draft would be a setback for your franchise?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,652 Posts
It wouldn't be a setback. It just wouldn't help you a whole lot either if you are a team struggling to get to 30 wins and there are plenty of teams like that in the NBA right now. What they need is star power, not a solid player like Deng. Which is exactly why so many teams are in a dilemma, it is difficult to turn around your fortunes when you are bad and aren't likely to acquire a star.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
51,478 Posts
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top