Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
NEW YORK -- Mark Cuban never misses a trip to Madison Square Garden, where he has been known to entertain the masses through engaging a scraggily crew of recorder-toting media types in pregame dialogue.

On Monday night, Cuban weighed in on the biggest story in the NBA of the past 24 hours, one that he believes already has run its course: the Nets signing openly gay player Jason Collins to a 10-day contract.

"I think it's no big deal and that's exactly the way it should be," Cuban said before the Mavericks played the reeling Knicks at MSG. "He's been playing in the league forever. The guy's known. As long as they get their ass kicked in the playoffs, that's all I care about."

On the Collins phenomenon, Cuban continued, "At some point it becomes something to talk about, and now there's nothing to talk about. Moving on."

But Collins' preseason announcement that he is gay, and the Nets' decision to sign him to a 10-day contract on Sunday, has drawn commentary from all over the sports world. Surely, it is a big story and there is lots to talk about. No?

"That's just the way it works," Cuban said. "It was [a big deal] until it isn't, and now it's not. Next. Nothing more to talk about. I mean, I don't give a [expletive] about a guy's sexuality. Period, end of story."

Someday -- maybe soon, as in when the next active athlete in one of the four major North American sports follows the path blazed by Collins -- Cuban will be right.

On other topics, Cuban was typically entertaining:

• Regarding the notion that the Mavs (34-23), currently in the eighth playoff spot in the West, are caught in a no-man's land of mediocrity, Cuban was dismissive. Wouldn't he rather be really good or really bad (i.e. tanking)? "Oh, absolutely not," Cuban said. "That's dumb [expletive]. There's no team that's so dominant that they're the runaway favorites. It's not the Eastern Conference." Only nine games separate the eight-place Mavs from the first-place Thunder in the West; in the East, the Heat are 1 1/2 games behind the Pacers while the third-place Raptors are 10 games behind Miami. "One turned ankle for anybody and it's a whole different animal," Cuban said.

• On what he likes so far from new commissioner Adam Silver: "I think he's taken some great steps on the officiating. There's been more changes in 15 days or whatever it is than I saw in 13 years, so I like what he's doing there." In recent years, the league began making public acknowledgements of missed calls only when they happen in late-game situations and directly affect the outcome of a game. But Cuban said the league has done a better job lately of communicating directly with teams about missed calls even when they don't rise to that level. "They've been more proactive and I think that's a huge step in the right direction," Cuban said.

• On whether Silver is more open-minded than his predecessor, David Stern: "I don't think it's about being open-minded. I think they just have different approaches. They both have the same goal and that's to optimize and maximize the brand and the profitability of the NBA. ... There will be some things that David was better at and there will be some things that Adam is better at."

• On why the trade deadline is dead: "We didn't know what to expect. In hindsight, you could say that teams kind of defined their strategies. Nobody was caught in between. They were either under the cap or way over the cap or the tax threshold, or they were rebuilding. I think what caused there to be a lot less activity was that teams' perceived value of first-round picks went through the roof. Nobody was giving up picks." ... As for whether teams are now overvaluing draft picks, Cuban said, "I don't know, we'll find out."
http://www.cbssports.com/nba/writer/ken-berger/24456128/cuban-jason-collins-story-no-big-deal

Cuban is an interesting guy.
 

·
Oladipo for the people
Joined
·
48,150 Posts
That's my take on it. No big deal.

Only being seen as a big deal because everyone in the media is trying to make it one.
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Certainly the media buzz was greater when it was a hypothetical, and people could sensationalize about all the possible scenarios. Now that it's real, everything quieted down.

So when Cuban says,
"That's just the way it works," Cuban said. "It was [a big deal] until it isn't, and now it's not. Next. Nothing more to talk about. I mean, I don't give a [expletive] about a guy's sexuality. Period, end of story."
, that's what he's referring to.
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
There's actually a lot of interesting thoughts in this article outside of the remarks on Collins (as the quote mentions). Good stuff on the underwhelming trade deadline and Adam Silver taking over for David Stern.
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Agree. Now, if a major star came out that would be different - as it would be really interesting to see if his 'brand' was affected.
Also on that note, Jason Collins is the #1 selling jersey on NBA.com. I feel that it's more of a temporary bump (like when players switch teams, or a new jersey comes out), but still unknown how it would affect a player who already had endorsements.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Mark Cuban: NCAA is "hypocritical"

DALLAS -- Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban believes it's in the best interests of elite prospects to play in the NBA Development League instead of spending one season in the "hypocritical" NCAA.

"I think what will end up happening -- and this is my opinion, not that of the league -- is if the colleges don't change from the one-and-done, we'll go after the one," Cuban said. "The NCAA rules are so hypocritical, there's absolutely no reason for a kid to go [to college], because he's not going to class [and] he's actually not even able to take advantage of all the fun because the first semester he starts playing basketball. So if the goal is just to graduate to the NBA or be an NBA player, go to the D-League."

Under the current collective bargaining agreement, players have to be one year out of high school and 19 years old to play in the NBA. However, the minimum age for the D-League is 18.

Cuban would like to see the NBA take steps to make the D-League a more attractive alternative to players who intend to spend only one season playing college basketball. While Cuban said he hasn't analyzed the situation enough to make a formal proposal, he envisions the NBA working with nearby universities to provide straight-out-of-high-school players an opportunity to pursue a college education while playing in the D-League.

Cuban suggests guaranteeing college tuition for such players, whether or not they pan out as NBA prospects, as an incentive.

"We can get rid of all the hypocrisy and improve the education," Cuban said. "If the whole plan is just to go to college for one year maybe or just the first semester, that's not a student-athlete. That's ridiculous.

"You don't have to pretend. We don't have to pretend. A major college has to pretend that they're treating them like a student-athlete, and it's a big lie and we all know it's a big lie. At least at most schools, not all. ... But we can put more of an emphasis on their education. We can plan it out, have tutors. We can do all kinds of things that the NCAA doesn't allow schools to do that would really put the individual first."

At the minimum, Cuban envisions players who make the jump from high school to the D-League being required to take life skills courses. Cuban's biggest concern about one-and-done prospects is that they're often not mentally, emotionally and psychologically prepared for the NBA after spending only one season in a college environment.

He believes the D-League could provide a better atmosphere for freshman-age players to develop on and off the court.

"You have to develop some level of maturity, and that has to be part of the process," Cuban said. "You don't want to bring kids in and just abandon them. That'd be the worst thing we could do.

"We'd have to make it so where there'd be very strict policies and rules so that, even if you're not going to go to [college] class, there's going be life [skills] classes -- how do you deal with the world? -- and you have to attend those. You have to keep up with those. We'd have very strict [rules] on why you'd be suspended if you didn't live up to them. Things that should be done to student-athletes in college and are just not. Or not always."

Cuban's preference is that the NBA minimum age limit moves to 21 and three years out of high school. However, he can envision lowering the age limit for players who go to the D-League.

"We'd have to think it through," Cuban said. "I'm not trying to jump to conclusions and say I've analyzed this whole thing out. I haven't. But what I'm saying the interest is you're to maximize your ability for your chosen profession but you'd also have to make a commitment of some sort one way or the other, either to life skills training and/or academic training."

One conclusion that Cuban has reached: Playing in the NCAA is not the ideal way to prepare for an NBA career. He hopes the D-League emerges as a clearly superior option.

"Then you wouldn't be under the stupidity of the NCAA," Cuban said. "There's no reason for the NCAA to exist. None."
http://espn.go.com/dallas/nba/story/_/id/10538276/mark-cuban-says-nba-d-league-better-option-ncaa
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Well that's an interesting thought. I didn't know the D-League had a separate minimum age from the NBA. Euro leagues have already been an option for some prospects (Brandon Jennings comes to mind), but the D-League doesn't pay all that well from what I hear.

Certainly what he's getting at is the NBA having more control over it's own product, and being less dependent on the NCAA to feed athletes into the NBA. Although I disagree that there's no reason for the NCAA to exist. College athletics isn't going to disappear just b/c the NBA decides to put more attention into it's minor league.
 

·
Limehouse Blues
Joined
·
26,988 Posts
Cuban isn't really thinking that stuff through clearly. For one thing you can become a brand in college, which is valuable. Then the d league does not pay squat, and the NCAA has nothing to do with who can play in the NBA and who can not. The NBA did that to protect their GM's from themselves.
 

·
Oladipo for the people
Joined
·
48,150 Posts
I don't feel bad for any kid who goes through the NCAA and doesn't get paid.

The kids who go through, don't capitalize on the free world class education, piss through their NBA contracts and are out of the league and poor before they're 30? I laugh at those idiots.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,493 Posts
Cuban's right - the NBA would be best served making the D-league an attractive alternative to college ball and getting prospects into a professional environment immediately. Tweak the salary structure to offer a living wage, come up with an improved support network for players in that 18-22 age range, and come up with something closer to what MLB has than what the D-league is now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Cuban: Dirk's defense must improve

DALLAS -- Mavericks owner Mark Cuban made a point to publicly challenge superstar Dirk Nowitzki to play with more effort and energy defensively.

"I think we've got to get a little bit more out of Dirk defensively," Cuban said before Monday night's game against the Boston Celtics, responding to a general question about the Mavs' recent performance. "I think [the Mavs need] a little bit more energy out of Dirk, particularly when things don't start well."

It's rare for Cuban to publicly criticize Nowitzki, a 12-time All-Star who is the face of the franchise and was the 2011 Finals MVP. Cuban kidded that they have a rule that allows him to call out Nowitzki once every 10 years.

The timing of this criticism is odd, considering the Mavs had won four of their last five games, including a rout on the road against the Oklahoma City Thunder on Sunday night. But Cuban, who watched the games on television while vacationing with his family on spring break, wasn't satisfied with the lack of effort he saw from Nowitzki on defense.

Cuban said he mentioned his concerns to Nowitzki during a brief, sarcastic conversation Monday, asking the 16-year veteran how his nap was while he was on the floor against the Thunder.

"Dirk always goes through a little slump during the year when he needs to re-motivate," Cuban said. "I think we've seen that for a couple of games, and I think he's going to come back stronger, particularly after three days [off] and those naps he's gotten in the last couple of games other than Utah."

Nowitzki, the Mavs' leading scorer with 21.4 points per game, took the criticism in stride when informed of Cuban's comments after Dallas' 94-89 win over the Celtics.

"I've got to compete and help the guys set the tone," Nowitzki said. "Some nights, that's defensively or on the rebounding. Some nights, it might be more scoring. I usually take pride in being a good all-around player. Especially in this homestand, if we want to make the playoffs, we've all got to do a little more."

Nowitzki's poor defense was heavily scrutinized earlier in his career, but he has developed into a solid, savvy team defender. His defensive rating (105.0 points allowed per possession) is the second best among the Mavs' rotation players, ranking behind only center Samuel Dalembert and reserve wing Jae Crowder.

Over the last five games, Nowitzki has a defensive rating of 98.3, although that isn't necessarily an indication of effort. He's had some offensive struggles recently, going 7-of-25 from the floor in a two-game span against the Indiana Pacers and Golden State Warriors. After the loss to the Warriors, Nowitzki vowed to be more aggressive, especially early in the game, and responded by scoring 31 points on 12-of-14 shooting in a win over the Utah Jazz the next night.

"It's not about getting involved early, because you don't need to be involved offensively to be there defensively," Cuban said. "You know when Dirk's trying to get 10 rebounds and you know when he's not. And we need a little bit more of those try-to-get-10 games, because I think our starters in particular respond to his energy."
http://espn.go.com/dallas/nba/story/_/id/10625189/dallas-mavericks-owner-mark-cuban-says-dirk-nowitzki-step-defensive-effort
 

·
Oladipo for the people
Joined
·
48,150 Posts
Cuban's right - the NBA would be best served making the D-league an attractive alternative to college ball and getting prospects into a professional environment immediately. Tweak the salary structure to offer a living wage, come up with an improved support network for players in that 18-22 age range, and come up with something closer to what MLB has than what the D-league is now.
Agreed. Its a spot the NBA has severely been lacking. Look at the picks who look like they could be good players if they could get the minutes to learn, only to see them dwindle on the end of a bench. If the NBA had a competent D-League, you'd have guys like Doron Lamb down there instead of doing nothing on the Magics bench. Schoeder would be down there. Hell, Indy would have sent Orlando Johnson down instead of cutting him.

It just blows my mind they're messing up such an easy concept so bad.
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
More nuggets from Mark Cuban. He's on the set of the upcoming Entourage movie:

 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Mark Cuban thinks the NFL will decline as they expand TV viewing nights, saying, "I think the NFL is 10 years away from an implosion."

DALLAS -- Mark Cuban, the outspoken Dallas Mavericks owner, predicts a drastic decline in the NFL's popularity over the next decade due to the league's greed.

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban predicts a drastic decline in the popularity of the NFL, but there is no evidence -- yet -- that football's reach is waning, writes Kevin Seifert. Story

"I think the NFL is 10 years away from an implosion," Cuban said Sunday evening when his pregame conversation with reporters, which covered a broad range of topics, swayed toward football. "I'm just telling you: Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered. And they're getting hoggy.

"Just watch. Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered. When you try to take it too far, people turn the other way. I'm just telling you, when you've got a good thing and you get greedy, it always, always, always, always, always turns on you. That's rule No. 1 of business."

Cuban was specifically referring to the NFL's recently expanding its television package. He considers it a poor business decision for the NFL, which consistently dominates TV ratings, to play games on days other than Sunday and Monday.


Cuban They're trying to take over every night of TV. It's all football. At some point, the people get sick of it.
” -- Mark Cuban

In February, the league announced a one-year deal with CBS and NFL Network to televise Thursday night games. CBS will air the games during the first eight weeks of the season, simulcasting them with NFL Network. The league's cable network will exclusively show six Thursday night games later in the season with CBS' top announcing tandem of Jim Nantz and Phil Simms in the booth. NFL Network also will have a Saturday doubleheader in Week 16.

The NFL started a limited package of Thursday night games in 2006. NFL Network showed 13 Thursday night games last season.

"They're trying to take over every night of TV," Cuban said. "Initially, it'll be, 'Yeah, they're the biggest-rating thing that there is.' OK, Thursday, that's great, regardless of whether it impacts [the NBA] during that period when we cross over. Then if it gets Saturday, now you're impacting colleges. Now it's on four days a week.

"It's all football. At some point, the people get sick of it."

Cowboys executive vice president Stephen Jones disagreed with Cuban's take.

"We certainly do a lot of work as you know before we jump on these things," Jones said at the NFL owners' meeting in Orlando. "Certainly I can see why he might not say that, that we're getting too saturated. But I think we've done a lot of work to think that we're not."

Cuban said the NFL is making a mistake by valuing television money over the convenience of fans who are used to planning for their NFL teams to play on Sundays with occasional Monday night games. He compared it to the decline in popularity of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" after the game show expanded to air five days a week.

"They put it on every night," Cuban said. "Not 100 percent analogous, but they handled it the same. I'm just telling you, pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered."

Cuban expounded on his views Monday afternoon on Twitter.
http://espn.go.com/dallas/nba/story/_/id/10662203/dallas-mavericks-owner-mark-cuban-says-greedy-nfl-10-years-away-implosion


 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Mark Cuban on ALS Fundraising

On what he would have done if he had accepted the ice bucket challenge:

I was going to have one of our guys throw a basketball at a bucket of ice on a hoop. It was going to hit the backboard, hit the ice which was going to fall down. Then the water was going to stop. I was going to take a selfie with the water in the background, write a check and then get soaked. You know, just something simple.

On what social media has done to the ice bucket challenge:

“We’ve gotten to the point now where it’s not so much about ALS or raising money. It’s really a social media phenomenon and I’m starting to feel bad for a lot of the other charities who are going to have a far more difficult time raising money. A lot of people are going to try to copy what ALS has done and it’s going to be impossible. Someone else is going to have to come up with something completely different. Not to take anything away from ALS. Whatever amount of money they raise, good for them. It's a terrible disease. You never know which dollar is going to be the dollar that helps them find a cure. I think we may be reaching a point of diminishing returns. I don’t think I’m contributing to the benefit of anybody by continuing this because I think it’s going to start creating difficulties for other charities and diseases. I don’t want trying to coming up with an idea to fund raise to be about who is the most creative on social media. I don’t want to see a lot of charities waste a lot of money trying to come up with the next social media phenomenon. I just don’t feel comfortable with it at this point in time. Had I done it early I would have been like, ‘Yeah I was one of the early ones.’ That’s just my style. I've gotten challenged by Chandler [Parsons], I’ve been challenged by Jae Crowder, I’ve been challenged by a bunch of celebrities. I just don’t feel comfortable about it at this point.”
 

·
Come At Me Bro
Joined
·
6,946 Posts
Challenge Accepted: Mark Cuban vs Kevin Durant



Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is apparently ready to challenge the MVP. Kevin Durant of the Oklahoma City Thunder said on Friday that whoever wants his spot in the All-Star Game can play him one-on-one for it, and Cuban threw his hat in the ring on Saturday.
http://www.cbssports.com/nba/eye-on-basketball/25062294/mark-cuban-on-durants-all-star-challenge-i-beat-dirk-i-can-beat-him

I don't even know what to say. All I can do is laugh.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BlakeJesus
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top