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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As students can now make money off their name, image and likeness every school is trying to figure out how to oversee this huge policy change in college athletics. Here is UNH's policy. I might be in the minority but I thought leaving college debt free was enough for any student-athlete but it is what it is.



unhwildcats.com/documents/2021/7/7/UNH_NIL_Policies_July_2021_.pdf
 

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I might be in the minority but I thought leaving college debt free was enough for any student-athlete but it is what it is.
Any regular student can make money off of their name, image, and likeness. I don't understand why you would have an issue with athletes at these schools doing the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Any regular student can make money off of their name, image, and likeness. I don't understand why you would have an issue with athletes at these schools doing the same.
These are student-athletes not professionals. They get to attend college for four years or more free of charge in exchange for playing a sport that they love. I think that is a great deal when the average college student takes ten years to pay back student loans to get the same four year degree. I enjoy the AE because it's true student-athletes not like a lot of the P5 schools where it's a minor league system for the pros.
 

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Last year, they learned their actual value, especially football players, when Iowa St's AD admitted that "we’d essentially be bankrupt" if they didn't play. Yes, they're playing a sport that they love; yes, they're going to school for an education they alsop want, but to say that they don't deserve something is pretty much an outdated ideal. It's not like the schools are the ones paying the players, either; this generation of kids has known how to make money on social media since they were five...good for them.

Besides, learning how to manage money is pretty much something that should be taught anyway, why not while they're making money in college? Heck, those classes probably shouldn't be limited to athletes anyway.

Yes, there will be growing pains. Yes, the next two-three years will be pretty messy and be the wild west. But I truly think that things will come out for the better in the next few years once everyone figures things out. Student-athletes, at the high-major level like the SEC, and at the low-major level like the AE, will still play for the love of the game, they'll still be going to school, they'll be representing the school proudly, they'll just be making some money without being told no. If a school wants to deny their athletes this opportunity, they can always take the unfortunate route that Hartford took.

I truly think this may have an effect on pro sports, as well, especially football. There's that 40 year-old joke about Eric Dickerson taking a pay cut to leave SMU for the LA Rams; I truly think in the NFL and NBA, there's a non-zero chance that this will start happening in the future, espeically in the NFL. A player who graduates and is on Mel Kiper's Top 10 board can easily say "I don't want to get CTE at the age of 30, I'm going to cash out at the age of 22, and call it a career"; I don't think it's a stretch to predict that the first player to do this has just finished seventh grade. Given how baseball and hockey has reduced its traditional development models and pushed top players into college in the recent years (I've talked about this in the Conference Realignment megathread), who knows how this will change those, and other sports.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Last year, they learned their actual value, especially football players, when Iowa St's AD admitted that "we’d essentially be bankrupt" if they didn't play. Yes, they're playing a sport that they love; yes, they're going to school for an education they alsop want, but to say that they don't deserve something is pretty much an outdated ideal. It's not like the schools are the ones paying the players, either; this generation of kids has known how to make money on social media since they were five...good for them.

Besides, learning how to manage money is pretty much something that should be taught anyway, why not while they're making money in college? Heck, those classes probably shouldn't be limited to athletes anyway.

Yes, there will be growing pains. Yes, the next two-three years will be pretty messy and be the wild west. But I truly think that things will come out for the better in the next few years once everyone figures things out. Student-athletes, at the high-major level like the SEC, and at the low-major level like the AE, will still play for the love of the game, they'll still be going to school, they'll be representing the school proudly, they'll just be making some money without being told no. If a school wants to deny their athletes this opportunity, they can always take the unfortunate route that Hartford took.

I truly think this may have an effect on pro sports, as well, especially football. There's that 40 year-old joke about Eric Dickerson taking a pay cut to leave SMU for the LA Rams; I truly think in the NFL and NBA, there's a non-zero chance that this will start happening in the future, espeically in the NFL. A player who graduates and is on Mel Kiper's Top 10 board can easily say "I don't want to get CTE at the age of 30, I'm going to cash out at the age of 22, and call it a career"; I don't think it's a stretch to predict that the first player to do this has just finished seventh grade. Given how baseball and hockey has reduced its traditional development models and pushed top players into college in the recent years (I've talked about this in the Conference Realignment megathread), who knows how this will change those, and other sports.
The idea of schools being bankrupt without these football teams makes sense at the P5 level which makes up what about 65 of 342 DI schools. The non power 5 schools are not going to go broke without football. At that level it's always been semi-pro anyhow but now we're saying hey it's not enough that you get a free education and walk away with a degree now go out and make money while you play a sport. I thought that is what we had the pros for. I'm not sure the average student who takes ten years on average to pay back all of their student loans would agree that just having no debt when leaving college is not enough.
 

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I hate the "every other student" talking point. Maybe we treat athletes like every other student. We could go D3 and play a regional schedule, make them fundraise for their own gear, and their trips. Maybe we stop giving athletes preference in admissions, class scheduling, tutoring. Maybe we dont give them stipends or scholarships just because they can put a ball through a hop. maybe no more them free clothes and equipment.... Maybe we dont hire four experts and pay them $800k per year to help guide them and make them better at their chosen sport.....
 

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Students who are on full or partial merit-based or need-based academic scholarships, grants, fellowships, financial aids etc. can make money off NIL. They can work on the side while studying. They leave with no debt. Should they be stopped from making any money from NIL or other job?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Students who are on full or partial merit-based or need-based academic scholarships, grants, fellowships, financial aids etc. can make money off NIL. They can work on the side while studying. They leave with no debt. Should they be stopped from making any money from NIL or other job?
Nice to see so many other AE fans from different schools chime in with their opinions. I guess I look at it differently. I realize the average student can have a job while going to school to make money but it's not the type of money that some of these"student-athletes" will be getting at the P5 level. I'm not sure what companies are looking to sign the education major or the history major to be a spokesperson for their company. I guess I don't look at collegiate sports as the same as professional sports even though Jay Bilas was quoted this week as saying that by allowing players to profit of the NIL is the NCAA acknowledging that these students are professional athletes. My point and I stand by it is I think a free ride to play a sport you love is more than enough. In my opinion this is not professional sports.
 

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Nice to see so many other AE fans from different schools chime in with their opinions. I guess I look at it differently. I realize the average student can have a job while going to school to make money but it's not the type of money that some of these"student-athletes" will be getting at the P5 level. I'm not sure what companies are looking to sign the education major or the history major to be a spokesperson for their company. I guess I don't look at collegiate sports as the same as professional sports even though Jay Bilas was quoted this week as saying that by allowing players to profit of the NIL is the NCAA acknowledging that these students are professional athletes. My point and I stand by it is I think a free ride to play a sport you love is more than enough. In my opinion this is not professional sports.
Students on academic scholarships can monetarily benefit from their work. Why do you think students on athletic scholarships shouldn't be able to do the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Students on academic scholarships can monetarily benefit from their work. Why do you think students on athletic scholarships shouldn't be able to do the same?
Thanks for the question. I guess I don't see the average student on an academic scholarship being a huge draw for their name, image or likeness. I look at a young lady that I coached who just posted today that she finally paid off her student loans from college and it only took her 15 years. When the average student is in debt for so long after receiving a degree and student-athletes are going to walk away debt free to play a game they love I think that should be enough. Companies should be hiring pros to be a sponsor for their product not college kids. At the P5 level it's probably different as these young men especially in football are bringing in a ton of money for that university but that is only 65 of what 352 D1 schools. I enjoy college athletics especially in the AE because these young men and women are getting a quality education while playing the sport they love. I'm not into the P5 world where it really is more like the pros than it is student-athletes. Thank you once again for the question.
 

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I feel like if they are now going to get money for this (which is reasonable), I also think it is reasonable for them to have to pay their own expenses like the rest of the students. I mean, they get personal trainers for their athletic improvement, they get personal trainers for their physical well-being, they get tutors when they need them, they get hundreds/thousands of dollars of gear for their sport, they get airline/bus tickets, they get hotel rooms on the road, they get every meal taken care of for them, they get use of gyms/fields/weight rooms at now cost, and the list can go on and on. Someone mentioned them learning about managing their money, well here you go. They can have some income but in return they have to take care of their expenses. I mean, the average student isn't getting a full scholarship to study sociology and yet they still have to pay for everything (tuition, room, board, parking on campus, etc).
 

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I feel like if they are now going to get money for this (which is reasonable), I also think it is reasonable for them to have to pay their own expenses like the rest of the students. I mean, they get personal trainers for their athletic improvement, they get personal trainers for their physical well-being, they get tutors when they need them, they get hundreds/thousands of dollars of gear for their sport, they get airline/bus tickets, they get hotel rooms on the road, they get every meal taken care of for them, they get use of gyms/fields/weight rooms at now cost, and the list can go on and on. Someone mentioned them learning about managing their money, well here you go. They can have some income but in return they have to take care of their expenses. I mean, the average student isn't getting a full scholarship to study sociology and yet they still have to pay for everything (tuition, room, board, parking on campus, etc).
You’re talking about changing the whole scholarship structure that D1 was built upon. That’s a whole other can of worms; not saying this is wrong, but I think we’re getting ahead of ourselves by about 30 years by talking about this.
 

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You’re talking about changing the whole scholarship structure that D1 was built upon. That’s a whole other can of worms; not saying this is wrong, but I think we’re getting ahead of ourselves by about 30 years by talking about this.
Didn't we literally just completely change the structure of college athletics with players being able to be paid for their athletic abilities, something totally against all principles the NCAA model was built on? Why should student-athletes get tens of thousands of dollars per year in educational expenses taken care of AND then have the ability to earn a ton of money on the side? Very few if any "Regular" students don't get to double dip like that. I was awarded some work study money in college but yeah, I had to work to get it. I get that athletes don't have the time for that so they should get some money as well. But I think they should also have to take care of some of their expenses just like us "regular" students.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Didn't we literally just completely change the structure of college athletics with players being able to be paid for their athletic abilities, something totally against all principles the NCAA model was built on? Why should student-athletes get tens of thousands of dollars per year in educational expenses taken care of AND then have the ability to earn a ton of money on the side? Very few if any "Regular" students don't get to double dip like that. I was awarded some work study money in college but yeah, I had to work to get it. I get that athletes don't have the time for that so they should get some money as well. But I think they should also have to take care of some of their expenses just like us "regular" students.
So graduating debt free is not enough for these student-athletes? You do realize the only people that will be making a ton of money from this will be those few "student-athletes" from high major programs that play football and basketball.
 

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So graduating debt free is not enough for these student-athletes? You do realize the only people that will be making a ton of money from this will be those few "student-athletes" from high major programs that play football and basketball.
I don't think I said that isn't enough. In fact, I know I didn't as I have always felt it was but didn't mind a little stipend money because of their inability to work while in school due to the time constraints of their schoolwork and their sport. However, it doesn't matter who is making all the money from the NIL, the rules were changed for all student-athletes, not just the ones at high major programs. Of note to contradict the common misperception, the entire UCF women's basketball team just got sponsored, there are twins on the Fresno State WBB program that have huge social media and have already signed a major deal with Boost Mobile, which actually included a billboard in Times Square. Most will get some decent money from local companies, not really national ones. In fact, I think I saw that 9 of the top 10 social media followings among student-athletes across the country are players that are actually not at major schools or they don't play basketball/football or both.

* Edit - All I'm saying, without really examining all the potential repercussions or issues, I feel if a student-athlete is getting a full scholarship (at least what, $125,000 or more?) that covers room, board, tuition, books, meals, team travel, gear, gym access, etc AND is able to also cash in on their NIL, I don't think it's too much for them to also be responsible for some of their own expenses.
 

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Thanks for the question. I guess I don't see the average student on an academic scholarship being a huge draw for their name, image or likeness. I look at a young lady that I coached who just posted today that she finally paid off her student loans from college and it only took her 15 years. When the average student is in debt for so long after receiving a degree and student-athletes are going to walk away debt free to play a game they love I think that should be enough. Companies should be hiring pros to be a sponsor for their product not college kids. At the P5 level it's probably different as these young men especially in football are bringing in a ton of money for that university but that is only 65 of what 352 D1 schools. I enjoy college athletics especially in the AE because these young men and women are getting a quality education while playing the sport they love. I'm not into the P5 world where it really is more like the pros than it is student-athletes. Thank you once again for the question.
You are looking at this through the wrong lens. This is a labor market issue. Student athletes - well not all of them - walk away debt free "to play a game they love I think that should be enough." First, they play a game they love - but omg they make quite a few sacrifices. Ever try having a normal college friendship as a division 1 athlete? Waking up early on weekends, not drinking, being away from your girlfriend, not getting high AF and jet skiing with your friends... Plus the wear and tear on your body while having to keep up with academics.

Second, what do D1 football coaches make a year? There are more than 60 NCAA football coaches making $2,000,000 per year or more. A year of college education? $70k. Now, take ANY other sports league. Players make a SHIT ton more than coaches on average. In the NBA, the average coach makes $2-4 million a year. The average NBA player salary is +$8,000,000. Why? Players do the most labor - they bring the value. So, why on earth in NCAA is it the opposite?

If a team is bringing a school MILLIONS of $ a year, why wouldn't the team get the fruits of their labor? Why should it all go to the school? Well, the reason is they had a legal monopoly on college athletics. Without competition, schools were free to take the benefits derived from the labor of their student-athletes.

I'd suggest you read the supreme court decision - a unanimous, well-written decision drafted by a conservative justice. Needless to say, it is kind of an important decision. https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/20pdf/20-512_gfbh.pdf

They explain the completely fucked way these schools have profited off of the hard work of their students. Sure, this may not help the average student-athlete. I wouldn't have made shit off my name or likeness. But, I wouldn't have minded if the dude who worked his life to craft his profession made money instead of the school. Not like the schools were reinvesting this $ wisely into academics or helping anyone but the athletic departments.
 
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