Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Volleyball Coach
Joined
·
24,902 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure how many of you know of or follow Daniel Jeremiah (@MoveTheSticks) on twitter, but he often has interesting takes on NFL draft prospects. He currently works as an Analyst for NFL.com and NFL Network and was a former scout for the Ravens, Browns and Eagles.

Recently, he tweeted about one of Ozzie Newsome's big draft prep philosophies and how most teams don't approach the draft in the same way. He said that Ozzie made everyone focus on what a player could do, not what they can't do.

It sounds simple enough, but as I read more information and analysis of draft prospects (NBA and NFL) this concept resonates with me.

What do you think of the approach and is it different from how you look at players?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,279 Posts
I must admit that I kind of do an almost "non-statistical PECOTA" when I analyze a prospect. For the NFL I don't consider myself experienced enough to really have an opinion on anyone although I guess QBs is the closest, but this is absolutely what I do in the NBA. I'll see a player and extrapolate him based on what kinds of players/prospects he reminds me of. That's an interesting way to look at scouting though, and I think if you're in a front office that is the kind of thing you must do; I think focusing on what a player can do instead of what he can't do is how you find value in the draft.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,879 Posts
I think scouting a player requires you to look at both, but I think your gameplan should revolve around things your players CAN do more than anything else. You play to your players strengths to optimize production, but to make the right decision about who you want or don't want to play those roles you have to scout thoroughly.

That's my general opinion, on a more specific level I think it would boil down to your principles as a team. If they can do things that fit your team than that far outweights what they cannot do, than what they can't do is mostly unimportant. And of course, not all skills are created equal.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top