Professional and College Basketball Forums banner

161 - 175 of 175 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
69,618 Posts
Mr Curry is having himself a great season, and well because he plays for Davidson he gets little to no national exposure. I am still sticking by my guns, with what I have seen, Steph Curry is a better player than Harden
I was right
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,950 Posts
I was right
you can say you are right, but their situations aren't even comparable. you've got the 6th man for a team that was a big surprise and on pace to win 48 games and a starter for a team on pace to win 23 games this year.

the numbers are certainly going to be in curry's favor at this point, but give harden similar opportunity and i bet he'd be putting up some numbers as well. but as i've stated before, curry definitely is better than i thought he'd be.
 

·
.
Joined
·
4,361 Posts
Who woulda thunk it? Amazing how much Curry has developed, from being a nobody as a HS recruit, a late 2nd rounder to a lotto pick but likely a 6th man, to all-star, to MVP, to being on the brink of having the highest season PER of any player in the history of the NBA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,279 Posts
I was wrong about him. I don't go too crazy in this thread, thank god, but I didn't think he was going to be much of an NBA player.
 

·
Restore the Roar
Joined
·
7,392 Posts
I was going through it, and some of the comments about Reddick in the sidebar conversations are interesting in retrospect.
 

·
Restore the Roar
Joined
·
7,392 Posts
I was right
you can say you are right, but their situations aren't even comparable. you've got the 6th man for a team that was a big surprise and on pace to win 48 games and a starter for a team on pace to win 23 games this year.

the numbers are certainly going to be in curry's favor at this point, but give harden similar opportunity and i bet he'd be putting up some numbers as well. but as i've stated before, curry definitely is better than i thought he'd be.
Considering how good James Harden was last season - I'd say in the end you both wound up pretty damn right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
I was going through it, and some of the comments about Reddick in the sidebar conversations are interesting in retrospect.
Redick to his credit really improved his ballhandling, defense, and playmaking. Hated him at Duke but mad respect for how he adjusted and improved in the NBA after struggling at the beginning.

It's so interesting how some guys dramatically improve during an NBA career and other guys never make adjustments...all purely work ethic? Or is that a talent in of itself?
 

·
Restore the Roar
Joined
·
7,392 Posts
Redick to his credit really improved his ballhandling, defense, and playmaking. Hated him at Duke but mad respect for how he adjusted and improved in the NBA after struggling at the beginning.

It's so interesting how some guys dramatically improve during an NBA career and other guys never make adjustments...all purely work ethic? Or is that a talent in of itself?
In a way - yes. It has to do with a whole bunch of pathways we don't completely understand yet that involved cortisol and a handful of other biochemicals. In terms of a more macro-scale explanation the answer is also yes. The making of adjustments, the desire to work through plateaus - those things come from learned experiences throughout life. But I'm not a big believer in true free will, I think of everything we do as being the product of our experiences, which we do not get to choose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
In a way - yes. It has to do with a whole bunch of pathways we don't completely understand yet that involved cortisol and a handful of other biochemicals. In terms of a more macro-scale explanation the answer is also yes. The making of adjustments, the desire to work through plateaus - those things come from learned experiences throughout life. But I'm not a big believer in true free will, I think of everything we do as being the product of our experiences, which we do not get to choose.
Not to take this thread completely off-topic but isn't that a cop-out? The desire to work hard may be partially based on experience, but there is an element of choice in there. Not everyone has Ray Allen's OCD or Javale Mcgee's ADHD to thank for their ability to adhere to training regimens.
 

·
Restore the Roar
Joined
·
7,392 Posts
Not to take this thread completely off-topic but isn't that a cop-out? The desire to work hard may be partially based on experience, but there is an element of choice in there. Not everyone has Ray Allen's OCD or Javale Mcgee's ADHD to thank for their ability to adhere to training regimens.
It is in no way a cop-out. I take pride in my actions and in the fact that they represent the actions of those that raised me and made me who I am. It also frees me to look away from myself and at the bigger picture - In every moment I perform a meaningful action (namely: time at work, around younger generations, future educators, working on education policy in DC, etc) I'm confident that I'm using the full breadth of my experiences to help others. My existing provides good things for others. I feel like its only when I freed myself up from believing in free will that I really started to eliminate a lot of gender/race/age/etc bias and discrimination from my own thought processes (which is not to say I've eliminated all of them, but I'll always work on it).

We all look at things from a different perspective, and I respect that others don't look at it the way that I do. I suffered from a lot of anxiety and depression when I was young, and I feel like this view has really allowed me to push that away and become a productive and strong person.

To keep it on topic, you're right that those guys are unique. They're 'defective' in a way - whether it works to the good or to the bad, they're broken. Ray Allen has managed to find comfort in routines that made him an epic performer on a grand stage, turned his weakness into a strength. You're right about all of that. HE did do it. But that doesn't mean he has free will, to my eyes. Someone guided him to that ball. Something or someone gave him an amazing first experience. Something managed to kick that desire to obsess over shooting a basketball as a salve for his OCD. For Javale McGee - he didn't overcome. Somewhere up the line, someone failed him. Some inspiration didn't come through. Some experience didn't get him to take his medication and training his focus seriously (although I don't know the true extent of his ADHD - it IS possible he's chemically damaged beyond a certain level of focus, but I'm too lazy to do research on it right now).

You're just a product of your experiences. It doesn't cheapen you, your decisions, who you are. It makes you all the richer - your favorite character in every normal linear piece of literature has a predestined ending - it all builds word by word and chapter by chapter - into what they are at any given moment. You're the culmination of your experiences, and your value comes from such.
 
161 - 175 of 175 Posts
Top